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Old 03-28-2017, 03:36 AM
 
Location: World
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Almost every African country was colonized. In my opinion, instead of changing names, new names should come on newer cities. Old names of streets, cities should be kept unchanged.
If you change the name, the significance, history, culture is wiped out. Imagine changing the name of Cape Town?
Alexandria in Egypt was founded in 331 BC. What will anyone achieve by changing its name?
It is not that every European sounding name brings bad memory to African people.
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Old 03-28-2017, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Denver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munna21977 View Post
Almost every African country was colonized. In my opinion, instead of changing names, new names should come on newer cities. Old names of streets, cities should be kept unchanged.
If you change the name, the significance, history, culture is wiped out. Imagine changing the name of Cape Town?
Alexandria in Egypt was founded in 331 BC. What will anyone achieve by changing its name?
It is not that every European sounding name brings bad memory to African people.
Every colony brings back bad memories.
How is the culture wiped out? If you change New York to New Nice, would it be the same city with the same culture.
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Old 03-29-2017, 02:31 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dopo View Post
My guess is that African countries have bigger problems than "city names"
Impoverished India has big problems also, yet changed the name of Bombay to Mumbai, to break from it's colonial past.



Shiv Sena's leadership pushed for the name change for many years prior to 1995. They argued that "Bombay" was a corrupted English version of "Mumbai" and an unwanted legacy of British colonial rule.Jul 12, 2006
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Old 03-29-2017, 07:11 PM
 
Location: San Gabriel Valley
509 posts, read 299,879 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dorado0359 View Post
why do African countries, such as Namibia, South Africa, Botswana and others that were colonized, still have cities with Dutch, German and English names? These countries have gained their independence, why do they keep holding on to their colonized history...Are they proud of that? Why don't these African countries give their cities and towns names of their native language, take pride in their native languages and forget their colonial past.
New York City is full of Dutch names. I went to Stuyvesant high school, and lived on Staten Island, not far from the Kill Van Kull. I had a girlfriend once who lived in Todt Hill ("Death" or "Dead" Hill in Dutch, and once site of a gallows). The Bronx, Bushwick, Coney Island, The Bowery, et. al. all come from Dutch names, and there's plenty more than that. Hundreds of street names are Dutch.

Let's not even get into all the places in America with Spanish, French, German, Swedish, and Native American names.

The English didn't seem to take enough "pride" to change those names.

A place is what people call it. Call some place Todt Hill, and people refer to it as that, no matter how gruesome its name sounds to a Dutchman.
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Old 03-29-2017, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Denver
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Originally Posted by Maliblue View Post
New York City is full of Dutch names. I went to Stuyvesant high school, and lived on Staten Island, not far from the Kill Van Kull. I had a girlfriend once who lived in Todt Hill ("Death" or "Dead" Hill in Dutch, and once site of a gallows). The Bronx, Bushwick, Coney Island, The Bowery, et. al. all come from Dutch names, and there's plenty more than that. Hundreds of street names are Dutch.

Let's not even get into all the places in America with Spanish, French, German, Swedish, and Native American names.

The English didn't seem to take enough "pride" to change those names.

A place is what people call it. Call some place Todt Hill, and people refer to it as that, no matter how gruesome its name sounds to a Dutchman.

I don't think the Dutch had the English in NYC under an oppressive colonial power, that ruined their culture, killed millions of their people, stole their resources, etc.
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Old 03-30-2017, 06:36 AM
 
Location: World
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11 Native American Names for Modern U.S. Cities | Mental Floss

Anyone wants to revert back to Native American names of these great cities? The answer is No.
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Old 03-30-2017, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Denver
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Originally Posted by munna21977 View Post
11 Native American Names for Modern U.S. Cities | Mental Floss

Anyone wants to revert back to Native American names of these great cities? The answer is No.
Why not? I would love the symbolism.
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Old 03-30-2017, 07:27 PM
Status: "Hope is last to lose it..." (set 17 minutes ago)
 
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This thread is like asking why in the areas of the US that were Spanish many places still have Spanish names (Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco; San Bernardino, San Antonio, El Paso... the list is long). Ridiculous, if you ask me.

Even whole states have their names in Spanish (California, Colorado, Nevada; Florida, and quite a few more). Many other states have Native American names since colonial times or since they were admitted into the Union (Connecticut, Iowa, Utah; Ohio, Tennessee, Mississippi; Idaho, and many others).

At much more local levels there are many places that have always had Native American names (Mahattan in NYC, Naugatuck in Connecticut, Chappaqua in New York state; Kissimmee in Florida, and a very long etc).

The same thing can be expected of Africa. Some names simply stick to places. No need to change anything, IMO.
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Old 04-08-2017, 09:29 PM
 
2,066 posts, read 4,418,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
This thread is like asking why in the areas of the US that were Spanish many places still have Spanish names (Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco; San Bernardino, San Antonio, El Paso... the list is long). Ridiculous, if you ask me.

Even whole states have their names in Spanish (California, Colorado, Nevada; Florida, and quite a few more). Many other states have Native American names since colonial times or since they were admitted into the Union (Connecticut, Iowa, Utah; Ohio, Tennessee, Mississippi; Idaho, and many others).

At much more local levels there are many places that have always had Native American names (Mahattan in NYC, Naugatuck in Connecticut, Chappaqua in New York state; Kissimmee in Florida, and a very long etc).

The same thing can be expected of Africa. Some names simply stick to places. No need to change anything, IMO.
Comparing the naming of American states and cities to the naming of former colonized African country States and cities is not an equal comparision, because many American state and city names were derived from the indigenous Native American language. In contrast, Germans, Dutch and other European colonizers imposed the naming of many African cities, states and countries (eg. The former Rhodesia) on African people and named cities, states and historical landmarks after themselves or their in their own language (eg. Lake Victoria).
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Old 04-08-2017, 09:34 PM
 
Location: LA, CA/ In This Time and Place
5,433 posts, read 3,507,177 times
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Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
Thank goodness, at least Leopoldville was changed to Kinshasha.

Belgian King Leopold was a horrible genocidal monster, responsible for millions of Congolese deaths as his overseers worked the natives to death brutally, harvesting rubber and ivory. https://en.wikipedia/wiki/King_Leopold's_Ghost
I was thinking this sane thing. Most African cities have African names, seems only southern Africa is the exception and Liberia.
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