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Old 04-03-2018, 12:44 AM
 
Location: SoCal
5,722 posts, read 4,531,044 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80s_kid View Post
Yes he does. What would you expect from person of European descent. To put things in perspective, how can a continent that had Almoravids, Egyptians, Nubians, the Ashanti Empire, and many more be thought of as backwards without the Euro encounter? Black Africans brought Europeans out of the dark ages and Black Africans sparked what Europe's beacon of light in Greece....(That would be the Egyptians)
Egyptians are not Black.
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Old 04-03-2018, 06:07 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Futurist110 View Post
Egyptians are not Black.

Most of Egypt no, Part of Egyptian history they were, Twenty-fifth Dynasty of Egypt The Nubian south rule over Egypt
Twenty-fifth Dynasty of Egypt


There actually more pyramids in Sudan than Egypt.

Nubian pyramids in Sudan

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/...RER4-popup.jpg

I do not talk about Egypt, because racist love to only talk about Egypt and ignore the history of the rest of Africa.
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Old 04-03-2018, 07:48 AM
 
4,434 posts, read 4,418,883 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Co-sign on that! You've summed up my experience interacting with that said poster as well.

He's a master of ignoring counter-arguments that could take the discussion into any depth.
I still waiting for poster to respond to my post on page 5....

If Africa Was Never Colonized?


http://happywanderlust.com/wp-conten...i-from-air.jpg

Triditionally Hausa, Swahili, Songhay, Tamasheq, Wolofal, Fula Somali and etc use Ajami scripts basically modify Arab alphabet to fit African language.


Ajami script


https://www.africa.com/wp-content/up...ktu-Africa.jpg


I also posted.... there overtly were African rulers who were interested and trade and modernization of their kingdom

Fante Kingdom.

http://trace.tennessee.edu/cgi/viewc...k_chanhonoproj

Quote:
disintegrated before the "Scramble for Africa" began in earnest in 1880, they
were as involved in the production and trading of these commodities as the
Europeans were. An important example of the interest of African states in the
development of commerce and trade is in the constitutional experimentation
undertaken by the Fante Confederation. This group was fonned in Ghana in
1868 to not only improve internal relations, erect a modem infrastructure
facilitating trade, and establish schools, but also held as one of its major
objectives, "to promote agricultural and industrial pursuits, and to endeavor to
introduce such new plants as may hereafter become sources of profitable
commerce to the country." The Fante Confederation was concerned about the
export market but also sought to, "develop and facilitate the working of the
mineral and other resources of the country." I 0 Thus we see a demonstrated
effort by African states to control the international commerce of their
territories and also to promote their internal development. Since they
controlled the resources, they were able to demand high prices for the goods.
Interestingly enough, the type of raw materials that were exported from
Africa during this period were not those deemed essential to the
industrialization of Europe.
The Colonial government were not interested in development Africa, Essentially Colonialism removed leaders and Governments who wanted to advance the state and culture. And put in place Colonial governors who didn't.


Quote:
Colonial economic policy made itself felt in other ways as well. As
previously mentioned, African governments focused substantial energy on
developing an internal infrastructure for trade during both the era of the slave
trade and during the period of "legitimate commerce." Colonial governments,
focused solely on the export component of the economy, improved the
infrastructure as well. Their interests were only to improve transport of raw
materials to market and not the improvement or enrichment of the colonies
themselves. "In order to encourage the movement of commodities for export,
the government built and operated railways to connect the interior and the
coastal markets. ,,22 This resulted in most of the roads and rail systems in
colonial Africa to be oriented towards the coast. Little or no development of
railways occurred between colonies or within colonies.
Quote:
problems in African economic development.
Colonialism lasted in Africa for only a period of about eighty years.
During that time, colonial governments built a substantial infrastructure,
introduced a cash crop system of agriculture, and changed the traditional
standards of wealth and status.25 Education refonns were introduced and in
many areas, modem state systems implemented. However, the long tenn
economic impact of European development held some very negative
consequences for Africa also. The infrastructure that was developed was
designed to exploit the natural resources of the colonies. Also, the
technological and industrial development that had been occurring in Africa
was stalled by the imposition of colonialism. Prior to the partition of Africa,
local production provided Africans with a wide variety of consumer goods.
The policies of colonialism forced the demise of African industry and created
a reliance on imported goods from Europe. Had native industry been
encouraged and cultivated by the colonizing powers, Africa would probably
be in a much better economic and technological position today.26 The most
significant negative impact of colonialism on Africa was the overemphasis on
single cash crop production. Colonial African economies were focused on
the production of one or two agricultmal products for consumption in the
world markets. The coming of independence during the mid nineteen sixties
led to the breakup of many large colonies. The individual nations that
remained often could not or did not produce the range of agricultmal goods
that were produced prior to independence and the breakup of colonies. An
example of this is in French West Africa. The interior states of Niger,
Burkina Faso, and Mali did not have access to the lucrative cocoa market that
tided Cote D'Ivoire through the first precarious days of independence. Other
consequences of colonialism is the destruction of trans - African trade and
cooperation. Prior to the partition of Africa, the continent had become
increasingly integrated economically, with trade occurring north - south and
east -west. The policies of the governing powers redirected all African trade
to the international export market. Thus today, there is little in the way of
inter - African trade, and the pattern of economic dependence continues.
The imposition of colonialism on the continent of Africa occurred for
many reasons, not the least of which was economic. Prior to this
development, Africa was advancing and progressing economically and
politically. Colonialism encouraged this development in some areas, but in
many others severely retarded the natmal progress of the continent. Had
colonialism never been imposed on Africa, its development would be
significantly different and many of the problems that plague it today would
not exist.
Another instance way before scramble for Africa

Affonso I Facts

Quote:
Affonso I (1460-1545) was a king of Kongo whose reign marked the high point of Portuguese and Christian influence in the kingdom, as well as the failure to establish relations between Europe and Africa on the basis of equality.

After the Portuguese navigator Diogo Cão reached the Kingdom of Kongo in west-central Africa in 1482, contacts between Kongo and Portugal multiplied. The Portuguese dispatched a technical assistance mission to Kongo, and in 1491 the Kongo king Nzinga Nkuwu was baptized under the name João I.

One of João's sons, Nzinga Mvemba, was baptized Affonso and upon his father's death in 1506 he assumed the throne of Kongo. Thereafter, relations between Portugal and Kongo became much more active. Missionaries, teachers, masons, carpenters, and military advisers were dispatched to King Affonso, who paid for their services with slaves, copper, and ivory. Serious problems soon developed, because many of the Portuguese preferred to engage in trade—especially the slave trade—rather than to exercise their crafts. Portuguese commercial establishments on the island of São Tomé also interfered in Kongo-Portuguese exchanges.

In 1512 Affonso requested tighter royal control over the activities of Portuguese nationals. King Manuel I decreed a royal monopoly over trade with Kongo, dispatched an envoy with jurisdiction over all Portuguese nationals, and submitted an extensive plan for the acculturation of Kongo involving the adoption of the Portuguese legal system, feudal titles, and court etiquette. Manuel's instructions were largely ineffective, and the Portuguese colony in Kongo was soon divided between a royal faction and a faction favorable to São Tomé interests, with the latter increasingly gaining the upper hand. The slave trade became the predominant European occupation; although Affonso himself was involved in this activity and did not object to it in principle, he strongly resented the traders' indiscriminate seizure of Africans, even including members of the Kongo nobility.

Portuguese missionary and educational activities declined. The number of missionaries during the reign of Affonso seems never to have exceeded 10, all of them residing at court. One of Affonso's sons, Dom Henrique, studied in Lisbon and Rome and served as bishop of São Salvador, the capital of Kongo, from 1520 until his death in 1526. By that time, however, the disruptive effects of the Portuguese presence had reached such dimensions that Affonso decreed the expulsion of all Europeans except missionaries and teachers. But he was forced to rescind his order and to content himself with setting up a board of inspectors to control all commercial transactions conducted by foreigners. Affonso's efforts in 1529 and 1539 to secure Vatican support through the dispatch of a mission to Rome met with no real success. The increasing disruption of Kongo royal authority culminated with the attempt by eight Portuguese to shoot Affonso in church on Easter Day, 1540. With this incident the reign of King Affonso ended, although the actual date of his death is not known. Portuguese factions supported rival contenders for the throne, and one of Affonso's grandsons, Diogo I, eventually ascended to the throne.

The reign of King Affonso left lasting memories in Europe and Africa. Kongo remained nominally Catholic during the following century, and lineal descent from Affonso became a recognized requirement for succession to the throne. At the same time, whatever illusions might have been entertained on both sides regarding the possibility of peaceful interaction between the cultures of western Europe and Africa were shattered in the reign of King Affonso; and a relationship that had started on a quasi-idyllic note deteriorated in less than one generation into the ruthless exploitation of Africa by Europeans.
The idea that there weren't precolonial Africa leaders and government that want to modernize their society improve education and Trade etc...... is a big azz lie.


18th and 19th Western modern influence could had influence African society the same way 10th to 12th Middle eastern cultures influence some Africa cultures.

Some of the precolonial nation states could had follow the way China and Japan did.
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Old 04-03-2018, 08:16 AM
Status: "RIP Solomon Tekah" (set 9 days ago)
 
1,224 posts, read 581,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post

I do not talk about Egypt, because racist love to only talk about Egypt and ignore the history of the rest of Africa.
Yeah, racist love to ignore the early history of Kemet too. The people were melanated Africans not the bogus a/ss dark Caucauwhatevers. Fact is, the early Egyptologists were just establishing branches of that famous tree belonging to a very famous movement in the US and Europe.
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Old 04-03-2018, 08:24 AM
 
606 posts, read 465,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
This is what I talking about with falseness to make a point, that creates a larger wrap world view


. before industrial revolution 1750 to 1910 European nations were not that much ,more advance than Many African, Middle eastern and other Asian states.

"medieval Europe of an earlier age could have done." it literally could not. this butt crack lie

First off all not only would medieval Europe ran into other iron age states in Africa. but Europe was in not positions to. During the middle ages Europe itself was being invade itself by genghis khan from East and the islamic states in Africa and Asia were more advance than mid evil Europe states. Spain was invade by the mores, The Byzantine Empire started to lose the middle east and etc. What the heck are you talking about?



https://internetfigyelo.files.wordpr...ila-empire.jpg





before colonialism you had rising of Empires, A long the west African coast along Sahel, Indian Ocean, Horn of Africa and etc. In order for them to rises there had to be good leadership. the bases your post rest on ignoring this,

If through trade those societies were able to rise and become power states with the technological advancement of their day, with learning the last break though of the industrial revouation what promise is to say they wouldn't advance further? , you have none.

African is not monolithic you likely would had some state doing good and and other doing bad.

As I mention my other post colonialism remove regimes that was loyal to progression of their people, state and culture, and now a bunch borders that don't mean anything. Ethnic tension is high in Africa lot of which these cultures had there own nation.

Imagine European bolder redraw to mean nothing. And you would have French, German, Italians and etc divided from each other and conflicts for influence on the country. The politics of this place would probably be crazy,


You've misread and misquoted my earlier post. You're responding to the opposite of what I said.
And you totally failed to understand the substance of what I posted and appear to be confusing my intent with certain other posters. Your post is actually not in disagreement with anything I've said earlier.
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Old 04-03-2018, 10:21 AM
AFP
 
6,898 posts, read 4,236,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80s_kid View Post
Yeah, racist love to ignore the early history of Kemet too. The people were melanated Africans not the bogus a/ss dark Caucauwhatevers. Fact is, the early Egyptologists were just establishing branches of that famous tree belonging to a very famous movement in the US and Europe.
"Melanated Africans" isn't the same as Negroid if you really want to be accurate with the taxonomy.


"Caucauwhatevers" lol you mean Caucasoid.


You should read more written from East and North Africans they despise you so called "Kemetians".
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Old 04-03-2018, 02:12 PM
Status: "RIP Solomon Tekah" (set 9 days ago)
 
1,224 posts, read 581,166 times
Reputation: 1183
Quote:
Originally Posted by AFP View Post
"Melanated Africans" isn't the same as Negroid if you really want to be accurate with the taxonomy.


"Caucauwhatevers" lol you mean Caucasoid.


You should read more written from East and North Africans they despise you so called "Kemetians".
Nah, I meant Caucauwhatevers. Not being hostile but Blumenbach didn't know what he was talking about. I've seen people claim that Ethiopians are dark Caucasoids. Okay....
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Old 04-03-2018, 02:16 PM
AFP
 
6,898 posts, read 4,236,862 times
Reputation: 5878
[quote=80s_kid;51508184]Nah, I meant Caucauwhatevers. Not being hostile but Blumenbach didn't know what he was talking about. I've seen people claim that Ethiopians are dark Caucasoids. Okay....[/quote]



Some Ethiopians claim to be dark Caucasoids as well.
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Old 04-03-2018, 04:22 PM
 
4,434 posts, read 4,418,883 times
Reputation: 3500
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheArchitect View Post
You've misread and misquoted my earlier post. You're responding to the opposite of what I said.
And you totally failed to understand the substance of what I posted and appear to be confusing my intent with certain other posters. Your post is actually not in disagreement with anything I've said earlier.
My apologise your completely right I was in completely go mode from responding to other posts so I read your post wrong, I agree with with your post
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Old 04-03-2018, 05:27 PM
Status: "RIP Solomon Tekah" (set 9 days ago)
 
1,224 posts, read 581,166 times
Reputation: 1183
Karl Mauch, the German and many other Europeans back then made speculation a sport when it came to the Great Zimbabwe ruins. This is another reason why I feel that Africa would be okay sans European colonization. I'm getting bored with this...I'm under the impression that dominant tribes would have absorbed the weaker tribes and would have progressed from there. Again, I don't have delusions of Wakanda but the people of Africa have more than shown themselves capable of living the opposite of the distorted idea that the West like to perpetuate.
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