U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Africa
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-22-2018, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Central Washington
1,012 posts, read 306,673 times
Reputation: 1671

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by 80s_kid View Post
So the continent of Africa would kill/sell most of their animals? You think they would have never delved into the arts, sciences, education, and architecture? That's interesting. The only things y'all think Africa is about are genocides, poverty, and being backwards.

Well, that's what they're doing now.

Quote:
Poaching right across sub-Saharan Africa has now reached the point where the trade in ivory is simply unsustainable and elephants could be brought close to extinction within the next ten years.
Quote:
The situation is even worse for rhinos, with the price of horn currently worth more than its weight in gold in the Far East. South Africa, home to 83 per cent of the world’s rhinos, is bearing the brunt. Last year was the worst ever, with 1,004 rhinos killed by poachers in South Africa, and this year’s toll could be even higher.
Poaching in Africa: Selous Game Reserve warning highlights scale of epidemic - Telegraph

Genocide in Africa isn't uncommon, and is happening now. South African farmers are being attacked on an almost daily basis, and Central African Republic is showing "early warnings of genocide".

https://southafricatoday.net/tag/farm-attack/

Another Genocide in Africa? Top U.N. Official Warns of Religious War Between Christians and Muslims in Central African Republic

The poverty rate in Sub Saharan Africa (41%) is over twice that of any other region with South Asia next at 17%.

Sub-Saharan Africa makes progress against poverty but has long way to go | Pew Research Center

And yes Africa as a whole is backward. On the list of Human Development Index, the 19 least developed countries are all in Africa.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...elopment_Index
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-22-2018, 09:01 PM
 
1,196 posts, read 434,663 times
Reputation: 3722
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80s_kid View Post
So the continent of Africa would kill/sell most of their animals? . x
They are doing it now. The African elephant population has been decimated by poaching over the past ten years. If it continues, this iconic animal could be extinct within decades. Around 70% of the world’s ivory is destined for China where it’s revered a symbol of wealth.

'You think they would have never delved into the arts, ..

Art is quite subjective, but even 'art' can do irreparable damage, as intricate ivory carvings can fetch hundreds of thousands of dollars. EIA investigators found that around 90% of so-called legal ivory on sale in China, was from the black market.

'sciences, education, and architecture?'

They haven't exactly lit up the scientific world with brilliant discoveries, nor has any African mathematician, chemist, or physicist risen to the first rank in these fields, much less won a Nobel or any other distinguished prize. And this is with modern access to many western institutions of higher learning the world over. Why would they have flourished in the absence of this advantage?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-22-2018, 09:25 PM
 
9,855 posts, read 10,104,608 times
Reputation: 5275
Musa I (c. 1280—c. 1337) or Mansa Musa was the tenth Mansa, which translates to "sultan", of the wealthy West African Mali Empire.

Naval charts of 1339 show that the Canary Islands were already known to Europeans.
Along the western and eastern coasts of Africa, progress was also steady; Portuguese sailors reached Cape Bojador in 1434.

IN the scale of human history, 100 years is not very long. It is possible that the African empires could have discovered Europe in the 1300s. The plague known as the "black death" reached Sicily in October 1347.

It is possible that while Europe was weak that Africa could have colonized Europe.

From 1405 to 1433, large fleets commanded by Admiral Zheng He—under the auspices of the Yongle Emperor of the Ming Dynasty—traveled to the Indian Ocean seven times. Certainly the Admiral's ships made the Santa María, La Niña, and La Pinta look like toy boats.

It was much more likely that the Chinese would discover Europe that that the African Empires would discover it. But there is also an outside chance it would have been the Aztecs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2018, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Maryland
18,620 posts, read 16,419,369 times
Reputation: 6347
Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
Musa I (c. 1280—c. 1337) or Mansa Musa was the tenth Mansa, which translates to "sultan", of the wealthy West African Mali Empire.

Naval charts of 1339 show that the Canary Islands were already known to Europeans.
Along the western and eastern coasts of Africa, progress was also steady; Portuguese sailors reached Cape Bojador in 1434.

IN the scale of human history, 100 years is not very long. It is possible that the African empires could have discovered Europe in the 1300s. The plague known as the "black death" reached Sicily in October 1347.

It is possible that while Europe was weak that Africa could have colonized Europe.

From 1405 to 1433, large fleets commanded by Admiral Zheng He—under the auspices of the Yongle Emperor of the Ming Dynasty—traveled to the Indian Ocean seven times. Certainly the Admiral's ships made the Santa María, La Niña, and La Pinta look like toy boats.

It was much more likely that the Chinese would discover Europe that that the African Empires would discover it. But there is also an outside chance it would have been the Aztecs.
It's possible that pigs can fly but they don't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2018, 08:37 AM
 
908 posts, read 548,237 times
Reputation: 834
Quote:
Originally Posted by dozerbear View Post
Well, that's what they're doing now.





Poaching in Africa: Selous Game Reserve warning highlights scale of epidemic - Telegraph

Genocide in Africa isn't uncommon, and is happening now. South African farmers are being attacked on an almost daily basis, and Central African Republic is showing "early warnings of genocide".

https://southafricatoday.net/tag/farm-attack/

Another Genocide in Africa? Top U.N. Official Warns of Religious War Between Christians and Muslims in Central African Republic

The poverty rate in Sub Saharan Africa (41%) is over twice that of any other region with South Asia next at 17%.

Sub-Saharan Africa makes progress against poverty but has long way to go | Pew Research Center

And yes Africa as a whole is backward. On the list of Human Development Index, the 19 least developed countries are all in Africa.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...elopment_Index
The ivory trade was around for centuries and had already decimated the elephant population even by the late 19th century. Elephants used to roam in every corner of Africa but since the invention of firearms they've been killed in large numbers for trade with Europe, Middle East and India.
East Asia only became a large importer of ivory in the late 20th century and by that time most of the herds were gone. It is fashionable to blame it all on China today but people should remember why elephants are in such dire traits in the first place.

https://www.thoughtco.com/ivory-trade-in-africa-43350
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2018, 09:01 AM
Status: "RIP Solomon Tekah" (set 4 days ago)
 
1,223 posts, read 578,430 times
Reputation: 1183
I don't have time to give my input on these videos because I have to get ready for work but I'll leave it up for our Euro Centric poster to pick apart and dismiss due to it not being in their sources.


Early African Architecture



African Writing Systems



Top 10 African Empires


African Literature


Africa's Most Powerful Military


How African Empires Fell

No, I'm not the guy in the video or have any connection to the guy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2018, 11:05 AM
Status: "RIP Solomon Tekah" (set 4 days ago)
 
1,223 posts, read 578,430 times
Reputation: 1183
Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
How about what was there BEFORE European colonies.
Well, yes. However, a lot of you naysayers are saying "Look at what's happening now....there's no colonization now." Colonization happened before what's happening now but the question is: Were they like this before or did the system and ways of the colonizer just carry over and affect the present day?

Quote:
Originally Posted by HumbleMerchant View Post
Did the colonizers somehow suppress the potential of the African people, bringing about stagnation? I think not...
Should I use the Congo as an example and how the Belgium gov't was sooo peaceful towards the native people? Oh and the US was just a great ally of truth and justice.....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2018, 04:29 PM
 
1,196 posts, read 434,663 times
Reputation: 3722
Africa had as much time BEFORE colonization as anyplace else to flourish, develop science and technologies, build cities and universities that would be praised as models virtue, durability, and beauty, while recording this noble history to pass on to future generations.

They could have gone forth to explore remote areas of the world and bring their highly advanced culture, philosophy, and ethics to those less advanced. And history would have remembered, because THEY would have written it.

But, despite a few flashes of local glory, they did none of that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-23-2018, 10:59 PM
 
9,855 posts, read 10,104,608 times
Reputation: 5275
Quote:
Originally Posted by PamelaIamela View Post
They could have gone forth to explore remote areas of the world and bring their highly advanced culture, philosophy, and ethics to those less advanced. And history would have remembered, because THEY would have written it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwardA View Post
It's possible that pigs can fly but they don't.
When the Ottoman Empire took control of Constantinople in 1453, while at the same time blocking access to North Africa and the Red Sea, it provided the financial motivation for Europe to being the Age of Exploration. Let's keep in mind that Europeans were primarily interested in acquiring goods developed by the superior civilization. You would be hard pressed to find a historian that would dispute that assertion

Tenochtitlan (present day Mexico City) was more developed and sophisticated than any city in Europe.

I think you are delusional if you think that European civilization in 1453 was the most advanced on Earth, and because of that they conquered and colonized the world. It was not "highly advanced culture, philosophy, and ethics", it was "guns , germs and steel".

Christopher Columbus was extremely lucky. He had convinced himself that the distance from Canary Islands to Japan was the same as Gibralter to Lebanon. The learned men in the Spanish court were right in their counsel to King Ferdnand not to fund Columbus, as a westward voyage to Asia would certainly have resulted in starvation for the entire crew. But nobody knew there was a continent.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-24-2018, 06:12 AM
Status: "RIP Solomon Tekah" (set 4 days ago)
 
1,223 posts, read 578,430 times
Reputation: 1183
Quote:
Originally Posted by PamelaIamela View Post
Africa had as much time BEFORE colonization as anyplace else to flourish, develop science and technologies, build cities and universities that would be praised as models virtue, durability, and beauty, while recording this noble history to pass on to future generations.

They could have gone forth to explore remote areas of the world and bring their highly advanced culture, philosophy, and ethics to those less advanced. And history would have remembered, because THEY would have written it.

But, despite a few flashes of local glory, they did none of that.
You know, they kind of did. Ironic isn't it. The Manhyia palace in Kumasi standing today isn't the original. Matter of fact William Winwood Reade documented what he saw there and how impressive it was to him in comparison with his hometown. It is funny that you guys just want to be well known and number 1 in everything....even to the point of distorted history and lies on other people's history. The British completely destroyed the royal palace of Kumasi, it's documented.

Last edited by 80s_kid; 02-24-2018 at 07:01 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Africa
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top