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Old 07-26-2017, 02:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caribny View Post

I think that its foundations is in the syncopation in jazz.
Alright it might be. I remember James Brown saying that "the one" can be found in Jazz.
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Old 07-26-2017, 02:41 PM
 
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As far as that Ewe drumming from Ghana. This gives some insight on how Ewe musicians learn to play in their style.
Quote:
Music is never written down; it is taught by elders and parents to their children. Rhythms and melodies are taught at a very young age. Songs are memorized meticulously over the years and then improvisation is extrapolated from learned knowledge...

The ensemble is able to create the intricate songs by beating different rhythms on the drums. These rhythms conflict with each other but integrate into a single form called cross rhythms. Cross rhythm is the combination of different rhythms that interact in a single piece. The Ewe can do this on drums by drumming out a 4/4 and 6/4 rhythms against each other. While using different time signatures, the rhythms combine to create a cohesive and artistically beautiful sound. Normally, drummers play a repeated pattern until given the signal to change to a different one. But when the master drummer plays, he is able to improvise during the song...

http://africanmusicc...drummer_16.html




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Old 07-28-2017, 12:32 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
As far as that Ewe drumming from Ghana. This gives some insight on how Ewe musicians learn to play in their style.


Such improvisations and polyrhythms are what distinguished jazz from other musical genres popular at the turn of the 20th century. Interesting many of the earliest musicians had involvement in classical as well as military orchestral music.

But they put that African bit in as it evolved into jazz. It will be interesting to see where the syncopation originated.
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Old 07-28-2017, 08:11 PM
 
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African Drumming plays a large part of the cultures in several latin American countries

Cuban Rumba

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCLA7_u0dMg

From Samba to carnival: Brazil's thriving African culture - CNN.com

Brazilian Samba

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i57uGviYaCQ


In the US during slavery Africans drums were ban


In the 1739 Stono Rebellion on the coast of the Carolinas and Georgia, Africans drums were used to rally slaves.
Stono Rebellion

In New Orleans which was govern by the french and Spanish had more relax treated of African culture as Latin America. African drumming continue a little longer until, Louisiana join the US.

So African Americans had to adopt new ways of percussion, largely the environment, stomping and claping. this played a role into creations of tap dancing, And later military instruments which played a huge role in creating Ragetime and Jazz. technically this was no longer African drumming but it was continuing the aesthetic of polyrhythm

Jazz and Ragtime became a major turn away from Classical music. Because of the strong fucos of polyrhythm, improvisation and the more use of drums. Originally not African drums but rather a new use for those military snares.

Later by 40's onward American Jazz started to be more influenced by the West Indian music which brought the clave and other drums into American music.

Not African drumming but legacy of it. legendary jazz drummer Chick Webb and band.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nc1oJsRjTgQ


During the 60's to 80's, there was a drastic change in Black American culture. keep in mind this is when black Americans started were dashiki, Afros, the black exploration films. the black art movement and etc.


A lot of Funk and Soul artists incorporated African drumming

Curtis Mayfield

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cmo6MRYf5g



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ayyy-03ITDg


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MjtOzLfebgY

A lot of Timberland, and The Neptunes productions who dominate Hip hop from the late 90's to mid 2000's used a lot African percussion.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X6JVJSrdepY

A lot of Dance hall, Raggeton, and Brazilian funk make more use of traditional African percussion


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6YZhmWbel8A
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Old 07-29-2017, 07:15 PM
 
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Yes the popular musics of the Americas have often "reversed" back into the traditional polyrhythmic styles of the folk genres.

It is interesting to compare music from the 60s with what is now being played in the Caribbean/Brazil. Doesn't matter the genre but there is an explicit shift to more drum based rhythms. A lot of this has to do with the fact that African culture was frowned upon in times past so its most explicit manifestations were deemphasized. Now people can be who they are.

I remember as a kid in the 60s growing up in the Caribbean upper middle class people weren't supposed to show that they enjoyed drum music. That was for low class people. Now every one is in it. It will shock many to see white and Chinese Caribbean people dancing.
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Old 07-29-2017, 09:00 PM
 
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At a BBQ listening and dancing to a fantastic polyrhythmic blend of Afro and Indo Caribbean drumming patterns. Trinidadians and Guyanese will be familiar with this. Maybe Grenadians might also know of it given their close T&T contacts.

The African rhythms take the lower slower tones and the Indo the light and faster tones.
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