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Old 10-22-2017, 06:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
Alright. I was also referring to Africans on the continent as far as when this African identity became something that they adopted. Like was mentioned in the quote "Africans" of the 1600's would likely have identified themselves by their tribe/ethnic group if asked what they were.
Probably when colonialism was set in place and international communications developed across Africa. When
they realized even though there were different cultures on the continent, they realized that these cultures had
common elements when compared to Europeans or Arabs in North Africa. I would imagine in the late 1800-
1945?..
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Old 10-25-2017, 06:24 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Agbor View Post
I always wondered if there was a specific point where New World Blacks lost their ethnic consciousness...I would guess at
different times, with different individuals. I would definitely assume by the 3rd generation in the United States...Where there
was the least amount of African reinforcement.
Enslaved peoples quickly had to construct pan African identities once they reached the plantations, and maybe even when they boarded the ships. They had to develop ways of communicating with each other, in full knowledge that they were all literally in the same boat. Granted ethnic identities would have been dominant but a pan ethnic identity would have also developed.

This is when identities would have changed. By the second generation specific African ethnic identities would have weakened, especially as in many places the planters divided people who had common ethnic or clan identities, as they feared this would have encouraged rebellion. So the children, knowing only slavery, and maybe having parents of different ethnic origins, would have seen themselves a "generic" Africans enslaved by whites.

Maybe by the 3rd, and definitely by the 4th an identity of a creole slave would have become dominant as there would have been less first hand knowledge of Africa, or of freedom. African slaves were also treated such that creole slaves thought them to be inferior. Once creole slaves began to see themselves as different from "just off the boat Africans", and became to display a shame of their African connections, and become impacted by the hierarchy of skin color the process was complete.

Identities in the USA where by the late 18th century there were relatively few African born enslaved peoples would have been clearly different from that of Cuba where large numbers of slaves were African born. In 1886 when slavery ended substantial numbers of African born enslaved people were still alive. There were virtually none in the USA when slavery ended in 1865.
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Old 10-25-2017, 06:39 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post
I read "When I Was A Slave", which is the account, taken word-for-word, of large number of ex slaves. The record was ordered by FDR who dispatched hundreds of out-of-work journalists to contact the individuals and write their history. It is available in paperback; The Library of Congress holds the originals.

In all those stories - I read dozens - no Black person ever referred to himself or herself as anything other than "us n******", or "we n******".
Growing up in the deep South in the 50's I can tell you that polite society referred to Black people as Negros.
Jessee Jackson is usually credited with coining the term African-America. That was in 1988, so I am guessing the answer to your question is "Sometime after 1988".

Today we have Black friends and I never hear them refer to themselves as anything other than Black and refer to me as White. In other words, today I see no identification at all with Africa.
This is no shock. Over 75% of the enslaved blacks brought from Africa had arrived by 1775 and virtually all by 1800. The USA is the only major slave owning society where there were more slaves when it ended than the numbers of slaves brought in. Whereas in the Caribbean and parts of Latin America there were always people born in Africa or parented by those born there this wasn't the case for the USA.

This is why the cultures of the English speaking Caribbean contain more obvious African manifestations than does AA culture, even though they were colonized by the same British stock people.

"African American" was invented as a term to convey the notion that black Americans were an ethnic group with a unique history and heritage and not just a skin color, which the word "black" conveyed. Contrary to popular belief it was never meant to convey any connection to Africa. It was merely meant to group peoples united by the fact that they had varying degrees of African ancestry and that this fact alone accounted for a bonding between these people based upon the treatment that they endured from the larger society.

In fact many people who use the term AA ensure that its meant to mean those descended from US slavery and it does NOT include those directly from Africa.
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Old 10-25-2017, 06:41 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Agbor View Post
Probably when colonialism was set in place and international communications developed across Africa. When
they realized even though there were different cultures on the continent, they realized that these cultures had
common elements when compared to Europeans or Arabs in North Africa. I would imagine in the late 1800-
1945?..
Not really sure that those people who aren't part of the elites have a notion of being "African" until they leave Africa. Sub Saharan people certainly do NOT have a concept of Africa that includes North Africa. Morocco might as well be Palestine as far as they are concerned.
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