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Old 01-01-2018, 03:57 AM
 
4,454 posts, read 5,739,941 times
Reputation: 2186

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
These polls also work in regards to how hard it is for an expat to live a comparable lifestyle abroad as they would at home. Meaning that if they want to have peanut butter, the costs take into factor how much it costs to have peanut butter exported to Angola, and to have available to expats. Same thing for their cars and electronics and everything else.

If you are in say, Asia, they already make the electronics and cars and such and probably have enough traveler types, that peanut butter is going to be lower priced, to meet demands of westerners who might find themselves working in Asia.

You take a place like Luanda, which doesn't have tourist infrastructure or tourist demands to have any economies of scale. So, for you to provide peanut butter or cars or electronics, it's going to cost a lot to get it to Angola. As opposed to somewhere like Kenya, which would have enough foreigners and tourists alike, to warrant having your western amenities.

So, what happens in places like Angola, is for that American corporate expat to have the same lifestyle, it's going to cost a lot more to have stuff imported there. You also tie into 'security', and the costs go up again. An expat can't just live anywhere they want, unlike say Bangkok. They are going to have to have security, probably provided by the company again, which makes more of the costs go up. In short, it just goes on and on. So these 'suddenly rich places with a demand for foreigner know-how, but lacking almost everything else for foreigners, they are going to be quite expensive to provide that 'comparable lifestyle' as back home.

Angola is the perfect storm for that. Also, take in mind, that regardless if Angola has peanut butter or not, the locals aren't all trying to buy it. But, I do think a bunch of western expats trying to live western lifestyles, among an otherwise poor population where that lifestyle isn't going to happen for them. That's a bit of a recipe for disaster. Which is probably why a ton of locals are trying to overcharge for basic things that shouldn't otherwise be so expensive in such a place.
That explains the phenomena with Angola. It a lack of already established infrastructure that is comparable with Western lifestyle that has resulted in that. It still has deep scars from the decades old civil war which ended just over 10 years ago.

Much of the city population lives in slums and high inflation rates have made the people there very challenging to buy the basic items needed to survive. So it shows despite the wealth from the foreigners and petrodollars, it not benefiting the a majority of Angolans.http://www.houstonpress.com/news/the...to-see-8805538

Last edited by other99; 01-01-2018 at 04:22 AM..
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Old 01-01-2018, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Big Bayou
721 posts, read 298,292 times
Reputation: 988
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
These polls also work in regards to how hard it is for an expat to live a comparable lifestyle abroad as they would at home. Meaning that if they want to have peanut butter, the costs take into factor how much it costs to have peanut butter exported to Angola, and to have available to expats. Same thing for their cars and electronics and everything else.

If you are in say, Asia, they already make the electronics and cars and such and probably have enough traveler types, that peanut butter is going to be lower priced, to meet demands of westerners who might find themselves working in Asia.

You take a place like Luanda, which doesn't have tourist infrastructure or tourist demands to have any economies of scale. So, for you to provide peanut butter or cars or electronics, it's going to cost a lot to get it to Angola. As opposed to somewhere like Kenya, which would have enough foreigners and tourists alike, to warrant having your western amenities.

So, what happens in places like Angola, is for that American corporate expat to have the same lifestyle, it's going to cost a lot more to have stuff imported there. You also tie into 'security', and the costs go up again. An expat can't just live anywhere they want, unlike say Bangkok. They are going to have to have security, probably provided by the company again, which makes more of the costs go up. In short, it just goes on and on. So these 'suddenly rich places with a demand for foreigner know-how, but lacking almost everything else for foreigners, they are going to be quite expensive to provide that 'comparable lifestyle' as back home.

Angola is the perfect storm for that. Also, take in mind, that regardless if Angola has peanut butter or not, the locals aren't all trying to buy it. But, I do think a bunch of western expats trying to live western lifestyles, among an otherwise poor population where that lifestyle isn't going to happen for them. That's a bit of a recipe for disaster. Which is probably why a ton of locals are trying to overcharge for basic things that shouldn't otherwise be so expensive in such a place.
^^This is most likely the correct explanation.
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Old 01-01-2018, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
9,876 posts, read 6,607,822 times
Reputation: 6273
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
These polls also work in regards to how hard it is for an expat to live a comparable lifestyle abroad as they would at home. Meaning that if they want to have peanut butter, the costs take into factor how much it costs to have peanut butter exported to Angola, and to have available to expats. Same thing for their cars and electronics and everything else.

If you are in say, Asia, they already make the electronics and cars and such and probably have enough traveler types, that peanut butter is going to be lower priced, to meet demands of westerners who might find themselves working in Asia.

You take a place like Luanda, which doesn't have tourist infrastructure or tourist demands to have any economies of scale. So, for you to provide peanut butter or cars or electronics, it's going to cost a lot to get it to Angola. As opposed to somewhere like Kenya, which would have enough foreigners and tourists alike, to warrant having your western amenities.

So, what happens in places like Angola, is for that American corporate expat to have the same lifestyle, it's going to cost a lot more to have stuff imported there. You also tie into 'security', and the costs go up again. An expat can't just live anywhere they want, unlike say Bangkok. They are going to have to have security, probably provided by the company again, which makes more of the costs go up. In short, it just goes on and on. So these 'suddenly rich places with a demand for foreigner know-how, but lacking almost everything else for foreigners, they are going to be quite expensive to provide that 'comparable lifestyle' as back home.

Angola is the perfect storm for that. Also, take in mind, that regardless if Angola has peanut butter or not, the locals aren't all trying to buy it. But, I do think a bunch of western expats trying to live western lifestyles, among an otherwise poor population where that lifestyle isn't going to happen for them. That's a bit of a recipe for disaster. Which is probably why a ton of locals are trying to overcharge for basic things that shouldn't otherwise be so expensive in such a place.
Well put. Almaty, Kazakhstan was and is an expensive place for expats (mostly in the energy industry) for the same reasons.
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Old 01-01-2018, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
9,876 posts, read 6,607,822 times
Reputation: 6273
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atlwarrior View Post
It never was or will be wise to depend on one source for economic development and sustainability.
Yes, but in practice it is very difficult to diversify one's economic base, takes a lot of effort, focus and time, not to mention the political will to do so.
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Old 01-03-2018, 11:16 AM
 
Location: new york
1 posts, read 295 times
Reputation: 10
yes true story
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Old 02-06-2018, 03:20 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
4,364 posts, read 1,657,079 times
Reputation: 7925
I just went to Booking.com, and the lowest priced hotel listed for Luanda is $100 a night for a double.

By contrast, there are plenty of $20 hotels in Almaty, Kazakhstan.
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Old 02-08-2018, 08:36 PM
 
249 posts, read 175,877 times
Reputation: 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by avekk View Post
I've read about Luanda, Angola and I've seen that like 1/3 of their population lives in slums surrounding the city. That city is extremely expensive for locals, if for expats who usually come with international companies and high wages is expensive, now imagine for a local. It's crazy to see how the most expensive city in the world is in one of the poorest countries in the world, it makes you think how unfair is life.
Angola is far from poor, one of the rich oil countries more to do w corruption which every country has. 25% in poverty is not good nor is the 13% in America.
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Old 02-09-2018, 06:36 PM
 
Location: NYntarctica
11,434 posts, read 6,394,116 times
Reputation: 4340
The cities that tend to be the cheapest for travelers are those that have a bit of tourism, but not completely overstuffed with tourists. Cities that are not accustomed to visitors tend to be super expensive because there are no cheap options for hotels or any sort of cheap infrastructure that tourists can take advantage of. Altho Latin America is very cheap overall, I've been to a couple of non-touristy cities which were obnoxiously expensive to stay in
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