U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Africa
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 06-02-2018, 02:35 AM
 
Location: Switzerland/Ticino
272 posts, read 78,199 times
Reputation: 122

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
Lets not wait on Europeans.

Various outlets can be used to expand people's knowledge of African history. I like the Gates PBS documentary. But why hasn't BET or TVOne put on something related to African history?



What is "Gates PBS documentary" ?....

 
Old 06-02-2018, 02:43 AM
 
Location: Switzerland/Ticino
272 posts, read 78,199 times
Reputation: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewTexico76 View Post
National Geographic, for years, tended to focus only on the more "extreme" or "exotic" tribal groups in Africa, such as Masai, San/Bushmen, Pygmies, Nuba, etc. I suspect they found the more common West African or Rift Valley farmer with oxen and metal tools to be a little too "boring" in comparison.



You are right... Now you can get more informations about ancient african civilization.. but there is not yet an organic source of ancient african civilization's history..


When i was a student the history of ancient civilizations taught in Switzerland were : Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greek, Romans... 65 % of the ancient history teachings concerned Rome ......20 % Greek...... and 10% Mesopotamia and Egypt Middle East Turk........and only 5% Chinese Persians Indian Maya Incas..... ect ect..
 
Old 06-02-2018, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,056,995 times
Reputation: 3925
Basil Davidson has written some great books on precolonial African civilizations. I would highly recommend them to anyone who is interested in the subject.
 
Old 06-02-2018, 01:33 PM
 
6,566 posts, read 9,077,651 times
Reputation: 2842
Any opinions on the Lebombo and Ishango bones?

The Lebombo bone is dated to be around 45,000 years old.




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0CQa6CrKyYs
 
Old 06-03-2018, 10:20 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,523 posts, read 17,750,904 times
Reputation: 30828
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewTexico76 View Post
One other point, anyone who thinks Africans are somehow "simple" or "primitive" should look at the grammar of any typical African language.
The idea that language gradually moves from simple to complex is a fallacy. It has been purported that the original languages of mankind were probably incredibly specialized, detailed, and centered on the experience of small groups with lots of "inside knowledge" of their culture.

For a modern comparison, think of the words, codes, slang, and jargon that people, such as those in sub-cultures, teenagers, occupational or religious communities, etc., use within their linguistic communities subsidary to the broader language group they all share.

If anything, the more expansive and developed a culture becomes, the more simplified its grammar tends to become. By necessity. The broader and more different the experience and background of people you need to communicate with, the more language needs to accomodate the differences of the speakers.

Many of Africa's dozens, if not hundreds, of languages with small populations of speakers illustrate this mode well. And for this very reason, most of Africa is dominated by a 'lingua franca', a simpler, easily attainable second language, like Swahili for example.
 
Old 06-03-2018, 02:53 PM
 
609 posts, read 466,491 times
Reputation: 1243
Gondar, Ethiopia


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=c6nyhFeAgNM


Also Azania civilization in east africa near modern day Tanzania. Not much info online about this one. Mostly fringe quack groups in S. Africa attepting to appropriate the name.

https://www-m.cnn.com/2015/10/19/afr...ami/index.html
 
Old 06-04-2018, 08:13 AM
 
914 posts, read 551,720 times
Reputation: 849
Quote:
Originally Posted by asiago12 View Post
What is "Gates PBS documentary" ?....
Here you go: https://www.pbs.org/show/africas-great-civilizations/

Not sure you can stream it in your part of the world.
What is the show about African culture that you mentioned in the first post?
 
Old 06-04-2018, 08:25 AM
 
914 posts, read 551,720 times
Reputation: 849
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewTexico76 View Post
One interesting thing about Africa, to me, is that the Bantu went straight from the Stone Age to the Iron Age about 1500 years ago, with no apparent outside intervention or influence.

Subsaharan Africans were very advanced in some areas, but lacked full contact with other civilization areas. Africa south of the Sahara and away from the eastern Coast and Sahel was largely isolated. Mesoamerica and the Andes were even more so. Europe was ahead by 1500 to a great degree it had more extensive contacts with a number of other civilizations.

Many Africans did have metallurgy (which no Native American civilization mastered - beyond some hammering of metal).
West African and Rift Valley agriculture was fairly advanced and intensive.
Oral culture was advanced, pre-colonial literacy - as far as I know - was limited to Ethiopia and areas with Arab/Muslim contact.
Professional artists and artisans were common, and societies were fairly stratified.

National Geographic, for years, tended to focus only on the more "extreme" or "exotic" tribal groups in Africa, such as Masai, San/Bushmen, Pygmies, Nuba, etc. I suspect they found the more common West African or Rift Valley farmer with oxen and metal tools to be a little too "boring" in comparison.
Not quite true - both Mesoamericans and Andeans used bronze and used fancy techniques like casting.

Another interesting thing about Sub-Saharan Africa is that the more temperate parts, areas suitable for Eurasian style agriculture, are generally less advanced than tropical areas covered by rain forests, savannahs, deserts or mountains. Areas around Rwanda, Kenya and South Africa generally had less sophisticated societies than West Africa or the Horn of Africa for example.
 
Old 06-04-2018, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Switzerland/Ticino
272 posts, read 78,199 times
Reputation: 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkwensky View Post
Here you go: https://www.pbs.org/show/africas-great-civilizations/

Not sure you can stream it in your part of the world.
What is the show about African culture that you mentioned in the first post?

A History Denieddiscovery channel documentary"...
 
Old 06-04-2018, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Maryland
18,624 posts, read 16,437,944 times
Reputation: 6348
West Africans couldn't even navigate large bodies of water, you guys are doing the most. No one is denying anything because what you are saying didn't occur. West African empires came into being only after contact with Arabs.

East Africa, in particular Ethiopia, was oriented towards the Mediterranean and Arabian Peninsula, not Africa.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Africa
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top