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Old 06-06-2018, 03:10 PM
 
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Everything on African civilization turns into an Egyptian debate about genetics and the Olmecs and Afrocentrist views.

 
Old 06-06-2018, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shiloh1 View Post
Everything on African civilization turns into an Egyptian debate about genetics and the Olmecs and Afrocentrist views.
Yes and it is a real shame. Sub Saharan Africa has many beautiful cultures there is no need to usurp Native American culture.
 
Old 06-07-2018, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Yes and it is a real shame. Sub Saharan Africa has many beautiful cultures there is no need to usurp Native American culture.
Right the ones that actually existed, that actually held their own against Europeans and Arabs they ignore.

https://www.dma.org/press-release/th...art-april-2018




Quote:
Development of the Asante Kingdom and Importance of the Gold Trade: Through “gold weights,” scales, and containers for gold dust, this section traces the Asante’s lucrative participation in the gold trade with North Africa and Europe. In addition to the exchange of goods, cultural exchange was an important and inevitable part of the trade. The exhibition includes 14th-century Egyptian brass vessels inscribed with Arabic calligraphy, which Asante artists incorporated into the surface designs on kuduo, special storage containers for gold and other valuables. It also includes the oldest extant gold jewelry that sank with the Whydah pirate ship off the coast of Cape Cod in 1717.
State Regalia: Includes both the insignia and symbols of royalty and all the personal items of adornment worn or carried by the Asantehene (king) and his attendants and officials. This section includes gold-decorated headwear and elaborate gold sword ornaments that distinguish the king’s sword bearers; carved wood staffs with gold-leafed finials that visualize Asante proverbs and were carried by the king’s linguists (actually his spokesmen-***-royal advisors); and cast gold pectoral disks made by lost-wax casting, hammering or gilding that were worn by certain officials who “washed” the royal’s soul. This section also includes ceremonial stools and chairs carved from wood and decorated with metals and designs expressive of Asante values, and a state umbrella with a finial representing a piece of bamboo, a symbol of strength and resilience, like the king.
Royal Dress and Personal Adornment is a part of this section and includes crowns from the 19th and 20th centuries, a variety of necklaces composed of gold and other beads, elbow and wrist ornaments, amazing cast gold finger rings, and tooled leather sandals adorned with gold-leafed ornaments. There is a selection of colorful and intricately woven kente cloths, which have recently influenced Western contemporary fashion and home furnishings.
Woman: Her Role in Asante Society closes the State Regalia section. The Power of Gold also includes a section dedicated to the role of women in Asante society, which is matrilineal; inheritance is through the female line. Sculpted wood figures and a recently commissioned double-pectoral ornament as well as a woman’s kente cloth are displayed in this section.
 
Old 06-07-2018, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Katy,Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwardA View Post
Right the ones that actually existed, that actually held their own against Europeans and Arabs they ignore.

https://www.dma.org/press-release/th...art-april-2018

Moderator cut: -

I also agree Olmecs are Native Americans, Chinese are Chinese, Japanese are Japanese. Egyptians are Phoenicians or Berbers and may have had a black king and a few white kings (Roman occupation) and probably a Turkish one from Ottomans (although that is clearly recent history) and others from every ancient group that went through that area.

Another thing everyone keeps equating Africans with Black but with Globalization and the fact that the Northern Third of the Continent is literally not Black or mixed peoples, I have always considered Africans to be those that have ties to the continent. That's why the growing population of Chinese Africans and Europeans (although the Chinese has declined in the past few years) in places like Angola to me isn't an invasion, but a sign of the continent going global and the last step of that has been increased immigration levels.

Last edited by Oldhag1; 06-12-2018 at 02:54 PM.. Reason: Please discuss the topic only, not other posters
 
Old 06-07-2018, 01:51 PM
 
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As far as Ivan Van Sertima's work.

Did he ever say that the Olmec heads were in fact depicting black Africans or was it more that he was looking into the possibility that there was a Black African presence in ancient Mexico?
 
Old 06-07-2018, 02:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwardA View Post

Right the ones that actually existed, that actually held their own against Europeans and Arabs they ignore.

I've always felt that Black Americans and other Blacks in the western hemisphere need to be rooted in west and central African history and culture and then branch out from there. I've never been big on viewing the ancient Egyptians as being our main focus. The Egyptians don't seem to be like most west and central Africans. I mean did the Egyptians use talking drums? Could they dance like most west Africans? The Egyptian's whole style just seems different.
 
Old 06-07-2018, 02:09 PM
 
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^

This Kemet thing just seems to have a more middle eastern vibe than a west African vibe.




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfTPXi3uUKA
 
Old 06-07-2018, 02:48 PM
 
15,402 posts, read 7,871,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motion View Post
I've always felt that Black Americans and other Blacks in the western hemisphere need to be rooted in west and central African history and culture and then branch out from there. I've never been big on viewing the ancient Egyptians as being our main focus. The Egyptians don't seem to be like most west and central Africans. I mean did the Egyptians use talking drums? Could they dance like most west Africans? The Egyptian's whole style just seems different.

I agree black Americans focus too much on Egyptians and if studying African origins should start with West Africa. However, I always suggest they/we start with our black American ancestors first then work our way back to our West African ancestors. I think it is important to learn of the roots of black America prior to exploring African roots.



On Egypt not being "black" I honestly do believe that they were/are "black" from a sociological racial POV because they are closely related to East Africans like from the Horn of Africa, Kenya, Uganda, etc. as well as the Sudan/Nubia. East Africans and West Africans are different culturally but all are considered "black."



I do feel that the global focus on the advancement of Egypt over other cultures (particularly European cultures) does have a hand in people negating the black African-ness of Egypt's past. DNA genetic research has shown that the roots of various Egyptian pharoahs were in Eastern Africa near Kenya. People in Kenya are not white. I feel that the whitening of Egypt is based upon an adherence to the idea that being black means one is inferior and that to reconcile the fact that Egyptians were not inferior means they must be "white" or either "not black" (as today people are ridiculous IMO when they say that Egyptians were white, that is laughable. Note, I even had someone say on this forum that people from Ethiopia were not black lol, because they don't have "Sub-Saharan features." This line of thinking is someone invested in black inferiority from a variety of angles and I view them as unlearned and of having some psychological problems. The evidence does show ancient Egyptians were African and have a substantial amount of "Sub-Saharan" African lineage. Mixing with the arabs and Europeans didn't make them great - they were already great).



But will note that Egypt and West African kingdoms did trade with each other so were aware of each other.



There is also the tradition of wrestling in the continent of Africa. Egypt had it's own style of wrestling as did other Northern, Eastern, Southern, Central, and Western African tribes. I think it is strange that people try to claim Egyptians aren't black. However it is very strange to me that some black Americans try to claim to be Egyptian (or Asian, those are the funniest to me, or the black people who try to make everyone black - IMO people who do this suffer from an inferiority complex).
 
Old 06-07-2018, 09:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by residinghere2007 View Post

I do feel that the global focus on the advancement of Egypt over other cultures (particularly European cultures) does have a hand in people negating the black African-ness of Egypt's past. DNA genetic research has shown that the roots of various Egyptian pharoahs were in Eastern Africa near Kenya.
Is this the dna work done by Albert Zink? I read that people questioned his results because he didn't always get the same results. More recent dna test done on new kingdom and middle kingdom mummies showed them to be Eurasian.


Middle kingdom Eurasian mummy:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart...ead-180968674/

Another thing is that most of the mummies with hair show either straight or curly hair. I have yet to see a wooly haired Egyptian mummy. Yes many Blacks in east Africa(Ethiopia,Somalia) have straight hair but this could be the results of Eurasian admixture.

Both the Ramses II and the Queen Tiye mummies have straight hair. Their straight hair could be an indication of them either being Eurasian or being of some mixture.


Ramses II:

https://images.google.com/imgres?img...ce=sh%2Fx%2Fim



Queen Tiye:

https://www.gettyimages.com/license/96782136
 
Old 06-07-2018, 09:55 PM
 
6,552 posts, read 9,067,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by residinghere2007 View Post

But will note that Egypt and West African kingdoms did trade with each other so were aware of each other.
What's your sources for this? West African kingdoms developed long after Egypt. Ancient Egypt and the Ghana empire didn't exist together.
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