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Old 11-29-2018, 01:31 PM
 
4,433 posts, read 4,415,587 times
Reputation: 3500

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Quote:
Originally Posted by treemoni View Post
Are you even black? This is the problem with white Americans. They think they are experts on people they rarely interact with and definitely don't respect. You have no voice in this conversation if you are not a part of my culture. I know you have been led to believe that you do, but I am here to tell you that you do not. Your time would be better served understanding your own history and the disastrous impact it has had on the world.
This weirdest response because I'm not stating anything that would make question my blackness. It fact because your trying marginal African ancestry and slave trade, I have ground to question you. Your to center blackness on Native Americans, calling Native Americans black and marginalizing African ancestry. But I going to ignore this.

Im light skin black American I litteally mention that in this thread, most black Americans are brown and dark skin, that clearly resemble people from West Africa, there minority of black Americans call Light skin like myself that have a more oblivious slightly mix ancestry. But a hold light skin family is rare, most "light skin" blacks tend to belong families most of their families are darker.

Example African American students Clark Atlanta dancers and crowd notice that dark and brown skin far outnumber lights skins.

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/hE4Inf1nb7o/hqdefault.jpg
Because black Americans are predominantly African ancestry "Most" black Americans resemble West African with out question

Nigerian Unversity students


Now people from Equatorial Guinea central west Africa.

http://www.voiceofafrica.tv/uploads/...7025658_en.jpg

This a pic of singer Nneka she half Nigerian half Germans. Most blacks Americans are darker than her, but as for the minority of black Americans called "light skin" resmables her. Because degree of mix ancestry.

http://djolo.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/nneka.png
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Old 11-29-2018, 02:23 PM
 
3,774 posts, read 2,033,149 times
Reputation: 5210
The little bit of history that I know about the native American tribe I'm supposed to be from coincides with various aspects of my family...mostly where they were settled. I don't think it's a coincidence that my family hails from the areas that belonged to the tribes that were located in those areas. You believe what you want. It's not even about wanting to claim Native American. My family obviously assimilated and there is zero chance I could ever get back to those customs. But the personality of my "tribe" definitely fits me. Also not a coincidence. Being honest about the past is the only way America is going to heal.
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Old 11-29-2018, 03:54 PM
 
112 posts, read 28,086 times
Reputation: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
Let tell you flaws in this, beside the oblivious that AA while slightly mix clearly share predominantly features with west Africans, hair, skin tone, facial features and etc and very little with the natives of Americas.

its well documented where and appropriately how much slaves came in the port of Savanah, Charleston, New Orleans and etc but also the ports and regions/ports slaves came from along the coast of west Africa. There litteally forts known as slave castles that were used by traders

Also the cultural exchange, in Brazil, West Indian, Central America and the southern US, there a large element of culture and traditions that link to West and central Africa. Like for example the West Indian accents are related to West African accents. Jamaican patois and bahamian creole are strikingly similar to west african pidgin english. And that just the tip of iceberg because there more when getting into religions, music and dancing. That link the black population in the Americas to traditions in West Africa.

Last flaw in what your saying there wasn't mass migration from Mexico before the 1950s. Even during Mexico control of the west the population was relatively small, beside the Native American population the area was largely undeveloped by the Spanish and Mexico, just a few explorers, missions and small towns. At the same time what point during slavery in America did a massive amount of Mexican slaves became nearly half of the states of GA, MS, LA and SC. Cause these states were half black during the civil war? At the same time they just happen to home or near Savanah, Charleston and New Orleans the post African slaves enter the US.


Would you consider someone Native-American if they had predominant West African features like hair, skin tone,and facial features?
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Old 11-29-2018, 03:57 PM
 
112 posts, read 28,086 times
Reputation: 18
A lot of people consider me African-American when I'm 75%African, and 22% European but I definitely consider myself Portuguese because of my great-great grandfather was Portuguese so I try to represent my Portuguese heritage so the perfect term for me is Luso-American which means Portuguese-American. My great-great grandfather was ethnic Portuguese.
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Old 11-29-2018, 03:59 PM
 
112 posts, read 28,086 times
Reputation: 18
@chiatldal You can't always tell if a black person is mixed just by their features and skin color. You can be biracial and have a black parent and a white parent and look 100% West African. So being mixed with white doesn't mean your skin is going to be lighter.
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Old 11-29-2018, 04:09 PM
 
112 posts, read 28,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiatldal View Post
Your mixing a bunch of things that have nothing to with the conservation.

"black" was not a popular term until the 60s, the term people of African decent were called Negro or color, Negro was the common term for black people in the English language, yes I know it origins is Spanish, spanish and Portuguese started exploring before the English they were first to sail around Africa and go Asia, they also stated colonization first and colonization most of Americas, and far more African slaves actually went to Latin American, they greatly influence the English which negro became the common term to describe people of African ancestry there even outdated maps calling the African interior Negroland.


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File...ents,_1736.jpg

Color was a mix catogory we commonly associate this terms with blacks because blacks have been the largest minority in most of US history. But the term color has broader definition that includes any one not white as people of color. blacks, Natives, Asians were all group as "colored". The term "black" was populatized during the civil rights movement of the 60s. Black Americans choose this term or Negro or color. As today Negro and color are viewed as outdated and offensive give context.

In the 60s the term "black" popularized

https://youtu.be/2VRSAVDlpDI

Mexicans are mix with high degrees of native ancestry, some fully native, some Spanish, French, and most mixed, a few have African ancestry but I'm not going to get into that. The reason people think Native and think Mexican because they have Mexican with high degrees of native ancestry or fully. Fully Native Americans people look nothing like black people, their were native that were mix we black that have darker complexion but their no "black Native" as black people indigenous to North America.

Now saying some black Americans are mix with native Americans im not refuting, and I encourage people to celebrate all there ancestry, what I'm refuting is you trying to make it as significant of an ancestry to compare to amount of African ancestry black Americans have. Then marginalize the trans Atlantic slave trade. On average most black Americans are 60 to 90 percent African of that 10 to 40 percent maybe native or European or a combination of both. But your trying marginalized African ancestry which black Americans are predominantly.

Just because you are majority African doesn't mean that's what you are nor does it mean it's the front cover of your heritage. percentages don't determine what ancestry is more significant, it's up to the person. My Dna results on 23andme says I'm 75%African, and 22% European but my Portuguese ancestry is definitely what I am and is the most significant ancestry and what represents what I am because it's the ancestry I focus on and what matters the most. DNA results don't determine what you are in terms of what country you come from. Lineage, and genealogy do though.
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Old 11-29-2018, 07:25 PM
 
5,273 posts, read 3,313,639 times
Reputation: 6434
Quote:
Originally Posted by AzureKite View Post
A lot of people consider me African-American when I'm 75%African, and 22% European but I definitely consider myself Portuguese because of my great-great grandfather was Portuguese so I try to represent my Portuguese heritage so the perfect term for me is Luso-American which means Portuguese-American. My great-great grandfather was ethnic Portuguese.
Wouldn't you just be American?

Heck, 6 out of my 8 great-grandparents (12 out my 16 great-great-grandparents) were born in Eastern Europe, (Poland, Galicia (both Ukrainian and Polish side), Austria-Hungary) and I've always considered myself American, never insert Eastern European Country-American.

I always thought of people who used whatever country and add the hyphenated American to it, like Chinese-American or Mexican-American, etc., either immigrated to America themselves or they are the children of immigrants. Not necessarily someone who is 2nd or 3rd or 4th generation.
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Old 11-29-2018, 07:47 PM
 
3,774 posts, read 2,033,149 times
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I just realized something else. I was listening to a reservation Native American talk about one of the tribes that I believe is one of the ancestral tribes of black Americans. He was telling the story about how the Europeans came around the 1500s and "brought with them diseases" that pretty much wiped out the native populations. Errrmmm...NOPE! What happened is, black Americans (the true natives) were given the slave narrative and mestizo/white Native Americans were told that diseases wiped everyone out (which explains their low numbers). The real story is America's indigenous were copper-colored (aka "red"). The Europeans went to war with them for hundreds of years in what was basically a land grab. They created the modern-day Native Americans and sold them the lie of their tribesmen being wiped out due to disease, when really they are just the offspring of Europeans. LOL


This is why in the Bible (sorry but I gotta go there) God tells his people not to mix with others cultures. It creates a double-minded person. If you are mixed-race and have one "white" parent and one "black" one, who is your allegiance to? Having double-minded people within a tribe increases the likelihood of treason. Our governments know this, which is why citizenship issues are such a hot-button topic. Do you want someone in your military or diplomatic ranks that could possibly have allegiance to another nation? No.
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Old 11-29-2018, 08:33 PM
Status: "RIP Solomon Tekah" (set 6 days ago)
 
1,223 posts, read 579,854 times
Reputation: 1183
Tree, you're going a little too deep for them. They won't understand what you're saying. They're content with the narrative (they'd make terrible DT's).
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Old 11-29-2018, 08:34 PM
AFP
 
6,898 posts, read 4,232,517 times
Reputation: 5878
Quote:
Originally Posted by AzureKite View Post
A lot of people consider me African-American when I'm 75%African, and 22% European but I definitely consider myself Portuguese because of my great-great grandfather was Portuguese so I try to represent my Portuguese heritage so the perfect term for me is Luso-American which means Portuguese-American. My great-great grandfather was ethnic Portuguese.
We've already talked about this having a great great grandfather that was Portuguese doesn't make you a Luso-American. You are a descendant of a great great grandfather that was a Portuguese American but you aren't one. You do have some Portuguese ancestry though but it isn't the same thing.
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