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Old 07-25-2019, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Chicago metro
3,522 posts, read 7,352,752 times
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Hey guys, I recently did a DNA test from Ancestry and got my results.

My ethnicity/regional breakdown:

Cameroon, Congo, & Southern Bantu- 37%
Benin/Togo- 36%
Ireland & Scotland- 7%
Ivory Coast/Ghana- 6%
Mali- 5%
England, Wales, & Northwest Europe- 3%
Nigeria- 3%
Native-American- North, Central, South- 1%
Norway- 1%
Sweden- 1%

According to a Wikipedia article and other sources, the average African-American is 72.1-82.1% West African, 16.7-24% European(majority of it constitutes modern U.K.), and 0.8-1.2% Native American- with many reporting no ancestry. I based my presumptions of my own results would be on those studies and that my overall percentage would fall within this range, but it turns out that I'm more African than the average at 87%. I wasn't expecting it to be evenly split between groups, and only relatively small amounts of Ghana and Nigeria. My British ancestry(only 3%) is a lot less than expected and it's indicated that majority of my European ancestry is attributed to the Ireland/Scotland region, which I surmise stems from one of my maternal great grandmothers who I strongly suspected was of mixed heritage, and it being my third highest ancestry at the percentage it's at just about confirms it. I must say this ancestry is partly strong, as I still inherited certain physical features (skin sensitivity and hair) that is widely attributed to Irish/Celtic people. lol

In addition, my DNA links me to early Virginia African-Americans, early 1700s and up until 1775. This lineage is indicated to have been traced via my England/Wale/Northwest; Benin/Togo; Cameroon/Bantu ancestries, and that at least some may have been free blacks, based on the timeline and story they have presented. This comes as a shock and left me a bit dubious because my maternal grandfather and grandmother came from the North Louisiana and Alabama regions, respectively. And while I already knew about family in Virginia, I wasn't expecting it to have been the sole traceable migration. I can hypothesize that my family must've have migrated from Virginia to other southern states and maybe a few farther north some time in the 1800s, and it is then when all of the other admixtures came into the fold.

Well, those are my results and story. I'm curious to see others who have taken a DNA test and what their results were. Post it here. Since this is the African forum, I'd like to especially see the results and perhaps migration lineages of other black people or those with high African ancestry(North Africa counts too).

Last edited by Chicagoland60426; 07-25-2019 at 08:13 AM..
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Old 07-25-2019, 08:37 AM
 
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Most North African DNA in the Americas arrived already mixed with many Spaniards. That is why almost all North African ancestry in the Americas is overwhelmingly in people that have some Spanish ancestry. In addition, all Spanish American countries didn’t have a migration flow directly from North Africa, yet North African DNA is present in most of the Spanish American population (always in the single digits). For this reason North African ancestry in Latin Americans is usually counted as Spanish, because almost all of it arrived with those people. Outside of the Americas and some people from the Iberian Peninsula, don’t expect people to have North African DNA unless they live in North Africa. That is simply the way it is.

The other thing is that don’t expect ancestry DNA to be popular outside of the Americas. Most people in the Old Worlds tend to not be mixed and they have to go back beyond 500 years to find admixture. Its usually within the region, usually consisting of some neighboring people. Its not like the Americas where relatively recent mixture of people from very disparate places is the norm. Even people that are of the same “race” will have admixture with people that isn’t common in the Old Worlds due to distance.

Lastly, in the Americas the Caribbean Sea is ground zero for African ancestry. In the US there is more African ancestry in the South, the closest part to the Caribbean. In Brazil its on the northeast which is closer to the Caribbean. In Central America there is visible African DNA in the Caribbean side and almost no African DNA in the Pacific side. The Caribbean islands are mostly of African DNA and a few places are majority mixed, usually mulatto.

Last edited by AntonioR; 07-25-2019 at 08:47 AM..
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Old 07-29-2019, 10:01 AM
 
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I think that these tests flat-out ignore or hugely underestimate Native American ancestry in Black Americans.

On AncestryDNA, I came back with a Native American Maternal Haplogroup of A2 but 0% Native American admixture; which makes zero sense. How can I have a whole Native haplogroup but 0% Native admixture? BUT when I took 23andme, I came back with about 2% Native Ancestry.

These tests still have a long ways to go.

And it annoys me a bit since most experts are telling black ppl that all of our families are crazy liars that just made up Native admixture to disguise white ancestry out of shame....which I don’t buy. Maybe this happened in some cases but I doubt it occurred in practically every black American family. Something isn’t right..

(If anybody is wondering: I came out about 80% Sub-Saharan African and 20% other on both tests.)

Last edited by HomeHunt82; 07-29-2019 at 10:28 AM..
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Old 07-29-2019, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Chicago metro
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeHunt82 View Post
I think that these tests flat-out ignore or hugely underestimate Native American ancestry in Black Americans.

On AncestryDNA, I came back with a Native American Maternal Haplogroup of A2 but 0% Native American admixture; which makes zero sense. How can I have a whole Native haplogroup but 0% Native admixture? BUT when I took 23andme, I came back with about 2% Native Ancestry.

These tests still have a long ways to go.

And it annoys me a bit since most experts are telling black ppl that all of our families are crazy liars that just made up Native admixture to disguise white ancestry out of shame....which I don’t buy. Maybe this happened in some cases but I doubt it occurred in practically every black American family. Something isn’t right..

(If anybody is wondering: I came out about 80% Sub-Saharan African and 20% other on both tests.)
I think that 23andme has a larger sampling base for Native Americans than Ancestry, but even there it's not going to be a big difference for most African-Americans. The reality is Native Americans were nearly wiped out here in the states and were forced to migrate to states like Oklahoma when most of our ancestors were still in chattel slavery or just coming out. Unless you have a lot of family in Oklahoma or your ancestors were owned by Native Americans or lived on reservations, chances are you won't have much NA ancestry or show up at all. Also, DNA is not linear, but random. If you were told that one of your Great Great Grandmothers were 100% but the rest of your lineage is virtually all something else, it would become so diluted when it reaches to your generation that it might not even show or be much lower than 6.25%(the equivalent of a 2nd Great Grandparent). After all, you get 50% of your DNA from each parent, 25% from grandparents, and it continues to dwindle. It depends on how strong that gene was able to express itself in the generations to come. It's why even siblings get differentiating results.

And really, DNA companies don't know the race of the participants who take these tests beforehand. Whenever I see Mexicans/Central Americans and plain Native Americans take the tests, they typically come back with significant amounts of Native American ancestry, if not the majority. I've seen of several with over 90% Native American ancestry. There are a few countries in Central and South America where Native-Americans are still the majority. Celebrity and African American Snoop Dogg took a DNA test a while back and came back with 23% Native American ancestry. That's one of the highest I've seen for a black American, but it's visible in his facial features. Chris Tucker is 10% Native American and Oprah Winfrey at 8%.

Last edited by Chicagoland60426; 07-29-2019 at 11:27 AM..
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Old 07-29-2019, 01:53 PM
 
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I think it's simply that African Americans have very few Native American ancestry. Just look at Hispanics, the Native American component is on average higher than African Americans. This spans several countries up and down the continent, plus several companies. African Americans are genetically overwhelmingly Africans. Many countries in the English and French Caribbean are comprobable to African Americans in terms of DNA.

It has to also be taken into account that people that are very mixed would be considered African Americans too in the USA. The African genetic average among real black Americans is probably higher and the Native American component even smaller.
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Old 07-29-2019, 04:08 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston/Tricity
38,533 posts, read 56,349,984 times
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It's actually proven that the DNA results are full of doo-doo. A highly profitable trend.
When it comes to ancestry, DNA is very good at determining close family relations such as siblings or parents, and dozens of stories are emerging that reunite or identify lost close family members (or indeed criminals).
For deeper family roots, these tests do not really tell you where your ancestors came from. They say where DNA like yours can be found on Earth today. By inference, we are to assume that significant proportions of our deep family came from those places.
But to say something like: you are 20% Irish, 4% Native American or 12% Scandinavian is fun, trivial and has very little scientific meaning.
We all have thousands of ancestors, and our family trees become matted webs as we go back in time, which means that before long, our ancestors become everyone's ancestors.
Humankind is fascinatingly closely related, and DNA will tell you little about your culture, history and identity.
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Old 07-29-2019, 04:56 PM
 
105 posts, read 35,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
Many countries in the English and French Caribbean are comprobable to African Americans in terms of DNA..
The black populations in the French Caribbean countries like Haiti and Dominica are generally very pure and unmixed (95%+ African). These are people that could easily blend into a crowd of West Africans without anyone batting an eye. Black Americans are also mostly African but still more diverse in ancestry by comparison.

I’ve been exposed to a lot of blacks throughout my life and I still can never tell Haitians apart from West Africans to this day. However, I can pick out a Black American from them in a hot second! (With at least 80% confidence)
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Old 07-29-2019, 05:29 PM
 
5,450 posts, read 8,134,511 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeHunt82 View Post
The black populations in the French Caribbean countries like Haiti and Dominica are generally very pure and unmixed (95%+ African). These are people that could easily blend into a crowd of West Africans without anyone batting an eye. Black Americans are also mostly African but still more diverse in ancestry by comparison.
That may be true in places like Haiti, despite that country did received many African Americans in the 1820's hailing from east coast US cities such as New York, Baltimore, etc. That country has the largest mulatto group outside the Spanish Caribbean (despite this is a small group relative to most people in that country), a good chunk concentrated on the upper class. It goes without saying that while Haitians in general have a look, the country also has many people, perhaps the most nom-Spanish speaking people in the region that look wise are indistinguishable from the typical African American. There are some parts of Haiti and parts of Port-au-Prince where the distinguishing factor from most Haitians and most African Americans is cultural more than anything else.

Quote:
I’ve been exposed to a lot of blacks throughout my life and I still can never tell Haitians apart from West Africans to this day. However, I can pick out a Black American from them in a hot second! (With at least 80% confidence)
Most Haitians do have a look about them. It takes a short acquaintance with them and you'll be able to spot the Haitian from a group by looks alone. With Americans its more a cultural thing than a 'racial' thing. Simply by looking how a person dresses and carry themselves is enough to know that someone is from the USA, regardless of their race or how they look like. That's before a person says something, which is usually a giveaway. African Americans includes a component of people that are considered mixed in most countries where they exist. They aren't enough to make the African American group in general a mulatto, but I think they do influenced the African American DNA, mostly increasing the European component. Some parts of the USA there is more admixture than in other places within the same nation. Take them out of the question and the DNA of African Americans should increase the African component.
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Old 07-30-2019, 03:04 AM
 
Location: Caribbean
7,853 posts, read 2,515,627 times
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Nice mix OP. You have quite a spread in Africa.

I personally haven’t done a DNA test, as I’m already quite knowledgeable about my heritages.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeHunt82 View Post
The black populations in the French Caribbean countries like Haiti and Dominica are generally very pure and unmixed (95%+ African). These are people that could easily blend into a crowd of West Africans without anyone batting an eye. Black Americans are also mostly African but still more diverse in ancestry by comparison.
Dominica is Kreyol and English speaking. Current French Caribbean countries are Guadeloupe, Martinique, St. Martin and St. Barts. Those islands are more diverse and have other ancestries besides African/European.

Last edited by ReineDeCoeur; 07-30-2019 at 03:13 AM..
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Old 08-05-2019, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Tupelo, Ms
1,155 posts, read 672,839 times
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Hey Harveyworld , Here's mine:

Congo/Cameroon/Southern Bantu- 44%
Benin/Togo- 36 %
Mali- 5%
Ivory Coast/Ghana- 3%
Nigeria- 1%
Senegal- 1%

African roots : 90%

Great Britain- 6%
Ireland/Scotland- 1%
France- 1%
Spain- 1%
Sweden- 1%

European roots: 10%

Results are from AncestryDNA.

I know the 82% was citied as the average african ancestry for Blacks but there's regional variants. Generally , Blacks born in the south will have higher averages than those outside of the south. Being from Mississippi there's much Congolese descendants here. My euro roots seems to be primary English and the rest a unique mix of west euro cultures. I primary used this info as a reference guide to my African roots and examining the ethnic groups from each region. I would say that the average Black ( Aframs) person is a mix of at least 3/4 African ethnicities.
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