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Old 02-09-2008, 04:17 PM
 
237 posts, read 660,211 times
Reputation: 165

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RETIRED AF VET View Post
JUST FOR THE RECORD------

"Yall" is singular and "all yall" is plural. So don't go "gettin your panties in a wad" trying to make it different than it really is. Otherwise I'll have to be on you like "white on rice"! Of course, if you are bigger than me, I will just "lite a shuck"! Have a great day!!
I have to disagree. I was born and raised in Alabama and have never used Yall when addressing one person unless I was asking about his or her friends or family. "How have Yall been doing", when addressing one person means how have you and your family, or you and your associates been doing? If I'm only concerned about the person I'm addressing it's " How have you been doing?"
Yall is always plural, never singular. this is a big mistake that folks from elsewhere in the country usually make when trying to speak southern.
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Old 02-09-2008, 07:08 PM
 
116 posts, read 342,715 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HipLib View Post
Yall is always plural, never singular. this is a big mistake that folks from elsewhere in the country usually make when trying to speak southern.
This is the one them there yam dankees mess up when trying to sound "Southern" on TV or in a movie. It is always, always, always and forevuh more...plural, no if, ands, buts or maybes.
It gets me when someone assumes that all Southerns sound alike and then you get anomolies like a supposed resident of Chalmette LA sounding like someone from East Tennessee. Everyone know those wild Toms down there speak "Yat", and not a average Southern-sounding dialect and accent.
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Old 02-09-2008, 07:45 PM
 
Location: AR
564 posts, read 1,574,937 times
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You know, I find it funny that Yankees will make fun of our accents when we move to a Northern state, but when they move to a Southern state, they think it's "cute" and try to imitate it themselves.

I'm from South Mississippi and I sound like a Texan, with hints of cajun in it. That's mainly because it blended together when I moved to South Georgia and then Southeast Kentucky. I'm guilty of saying stuff like "got enough _____ to choke a horse" and "slicker than snot" and "rainin' like a cow peein' on flat rock." The standard "yunder" is there too. I do much more than that, but I'm too lazy to type the rest. Yep, it's pretty thick, but I like it.

My Mom, from time to time, will say "Well, I swannin'!" or something like that. Do not ask me what that means. One of those slang words passed down from generations.
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Old 02-09-2008, 07:55 PM
 
Location: AR
564 posts, read 1,574,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MullinsCurve View Post
It gets me when someone assumes that all Southerns sound alike and then you get anomolies like a supposed resident of Chalmette LA sounding like someone from East Tennessee. Everyone know those wild Toms down there speak "Yat", and not a average Southern-sounding dialect and accent.
Every Southern state has a different accent. It's what makes us great. I hate it when Hollywood has these cookie-cutter accents that makes everyone that's Southern sound like they're either from Kentucky or Albany, Georgia.
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Old 02-10-2008, 09:29 AM
 
2 posts, read 6,957 times
Reputation: 11
anyone heard "grinnin like a jackass eatin briars" ? I always think that ones funny. Good forum, lots of funny but true slangs..
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Old 02-10-2008, 09:40 AM
 
51 posts, read 147,106 times
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Undertheironsea--
I wonder what I'll "swannin" or whatever it is means. I have heard it said a little differently: "I'll swannee"
I don't have a clue exactly what it means or what it comes from. When I have heard it it is said just like "Well, I'll be" (May not be the same thing but it is said in the same manner) But I have noticed some people when they say it act almost like it is a swear word or not a nice thing to say.
Do you know what in the world this means or where it comes from?
If I hear it in conversation, I kind of know what the person means--Just like "Well. I'll be"
But where does it come from??
Does it have something to do with the Sewannee River?
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Old 02-10-2008, 11:24 AM
 
237 posts, read 660,211 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tuxedocat View Post
Undertheironsea--
I wonder what I'll "swannin" or whatever it is means. I have heard it said a little differently: "I'll swannee"
I don't have a clue exactly what it means or what it comes from. When I have heard it it is said just like "Well, I'll be" (May not be the same thing but it is said in the same manner) But I have noticed some people when they say it act almost like it is a swear word or not a nice thing to say.
Do you know what in the world this means or where it comes from?
If I hear it in conversation, I kind of know what the person means--Just like "Well. I'll be"
But where does it come from??
Does it have something to do with the Sewannee River?
My mother and her sisters used to say I'll swannee all the time. They all grew up in rural Tuscaloosa county so I don't think it has anything to do with the Swannee river. My father and his siblings, who grew up in hills east of Birmingham near Leeds, would always say things like "I'm a fixin to go a fishin'" I never knew where that "a" came from or what it's significance was. I sanyone else familiar with this kind of speech?
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Old 02-10-2008, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Floribama
8,956 posts, read 16,187,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HipLib View Post
My mother and her sisters used to say I'll swannee all the time. They all grew up in rural Tuscaloosa county so I don't think it has anything to do with the Swannee river. My father and his siblings, who grew up in hills east of Birmingham near Leeds, would always say things like "I'm a fixin to go a fishin'" I never knew where that "a" came from or what it's significance was. I sanyone else familiar with this kind of speech?
I always add the "a" to the end of "fixin", so it ends up being "fixina" (or fixinuh). I'm fixina go fishin.
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Old 02-10-2008, 12:25 PM
Status: "Semi-retired. On and off line interchangeably" (set 2 days ago)
 
9,820 posts, read 11,161,735 times
Reputation: 5026
Default Texas take on it all!

I've enjoyed reading this thread! We in the Texas forum started a similar one, if any one cares to glean over it:


Texas Thangs Hard To Translate

If y'all notice, there is a BIG BUNCH of overlap in some of the words/terms/slang as concerns Texas and Alabama.
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Old 02-10-2008, 08:58 PM
 
116 posts, read 342,715 times
Reputation: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by mary K wright View Post
anyone heard "grinnin like a jackass eatin briars" ? I always think that ones funny. Good forum, lots of funny but true slangs..
All my life....

Also heard someone described as "crazy as a run-over dog."


Quote:
Originally Posted by HipLib View Post
My mother and her sisters used to say I'll swannee all the time. They all grew up in rural Tuscaloosa county so I don't think it has anything to do with the Swannee river. My father and his siblings, who grew up in hills east of Birmingham near Leeds, would always say things like "I'm a fixin to go a fishin'" I never knew where that "a" came from or what it's significance was. I sanyone else familiar with this kind of speech?
I don't think it has anything to do with the river, either, but I could be wrong.

We generally say it as in this, "Well, I swannee, that has to be the ugliest dog I evuh saw."
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