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Old 01-28-2011, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,850 posts, read 19,592,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
In relation to moose, I have found that age makes no difference (it tastes good regardless). Based on my own experiences, it seems that if the moose is stressed before being killed (such as when it sees you and runs), the meat tastes sort of musky. That's why I like standing in one place near large open fields waiting for moose to step-in to browse. I have already measured the distances to different openings by the trails across the field. When I spot a moose I can take my time to aim and hit the right spot since I don't like the animal to suffer. I have been using my .338 loaded with 225-grain TSX, and hit them through the heart/lungs area, and would never take a shot I am not certain of. For example, I would never take but clean shots to avoid getting stomach contents on the meat.

The meat from the moose we kill is always cool, dry, clean, and in clean game bags. Then we I bring my portion of the meat home, I remove the bags and spray on it a mixture of citric acid/water, or just straight vinegar. I only hang the meat long enough for me to process it (in my garage), and if the temperature reaches over 40 degrees, I turn on a small air conditioner to cool the garage while I work on the meat.
That has been my experience as well, regarding shooting a stressed critter. The more stressed the critter, the more gamey the meat. I will not shoot a running critter, even if I have a clean shot, for that particular reason. The more relaxed the critter is when you shoot it, the better it will taste.

I have not processed a moose in a while, but when I did after I got it home it took me several days to butcher the meat. After I removed the sections from the game bag I would do a rough cut into smaller, more managable pieces and put them into my freezer the same day. Then, over the course of the next couple weeks, I would pull out the moose meat one piece at a time (each piece is between 30 to 50 pounds), thaw it, and continue deboning, and processing the meat into steaks, roasts, etc. I then wrap the meat in butcher paper, mark and date it, and refreeze.

The dogs, of course, got all the leftover bones.

Shooting the moose is the easy part. Field dressing, hauling it out, and processing the moose after it has been shot is where all the work comes in, and it is a lot of work.
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Old 01-28-2011, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
2,257 posts, read 3,169,580 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
.........................>>>>>>>>>>................ Based on my own experiences, it seems that if the moose is stressed before being killed (such as when it sees you and runs), the meat tastes sort of musky.......<<<<<<<<< I couldn't agree more............When I was a very young guy......I learned that any edible animal killed while standing still (before being aware of your presence), always tastes better than one that has been spooked and has been running..


I have been using my .338 loaded with 225-grain TSX, and hit them through the heart/lungs area, and would never take a shot I am not certain of. For example, I would never take but clean shots to avoid getting stomach contents on the meat. ..
Since I acquired my .338 Win Mag in 1963, I have used just one load: 225 gr Nosler Partition over IMR 4350. It's taken moose caribou; sitka deer; & wolf in AK......as well as elk; mule deer; WT deer; and antelope in MT. It has never failed to do the job when the bullet is properly placed. The one animal I could have used it on,...but didn't....was my Kodiak Brown.....I went with a .375 H&H handloaded with 300 gr Nosler Partitions.........Funny thing: loaded up 60....used 9 to sight it in to be dead on at 50 yards.....and put 3 into the bear. The rest are still in the reloading cabinet.
...
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Old 01-28-2011, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,309 posts, read 33,329,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
What my hunting partner and I decided a few years ago was to just out there for a period of two weeks and enjoy our vacations. Family members sometimes come to visit during the weekends, but the idea for us is to have a relaxing time while hunting and camping. I also look around and take pictures, including photos of the Auroras, birds, etc. Must times when I am not even thinking about moose that's the time when a bull moose appears in the fields I watch. We hunt for meat, but don't mind taking a trophy every now and then if it happens to come by.

In relation to moose, I have found that age makes no difference (it tastes good regardless). Based on my own experiences, it seems that if the moose is stressed before being killed (such as when it sees you and runs), the meat tastes sort of musky. That's why I like standing in one place near large open fields waiting for moose to step-in to browse. I have already measured the distances to different openings by the trails across the field. When I spot a moose I can take my time to aim and hit the right spot since I don't like the animal to suffer. I have been using my .338 loaded with 225-grain TSX, and hit them through the heart/lungs area, and would never take a shot I am not certain of. For example, I would never take but clean shots to avoid getting stomach contents on the meat.

The meat from the moose we kill is always cool, dry, clean, and in clean game bags. Then we I bring my portion of the meat home, I remove the bags and spray on it a mixture of citric acid/water, or just straight vinegar. I only hang the meat long enough for me to process it (in my garage), and if the temperature reaches over 40 degrees, I turn on a small air conditioner to cool the garage while I work on the meat.
If you ever get the opportunity to kill a feral hog, brain it. Adrenaline and cortisone seem to have a profound effect on the meat's suitability as table fare (based on my own experience, of course). Don't let anyone tell you that a gnarly boar isn't fine eating. The little ones are the best, but I think a 200-300 pounder is great for grilling and ribs if he/she was a "no squeal kill". I hadn't really considered the possibility that this could also be true of antelope species. I think most people avoid the big pigs because they are difficult to clean, but I gather that this shouldn't be an issue for a moose hunter.
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Old 01-28-2011, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,171 posts, read 27,428,664 times
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Glitch,

What I have been doing for the past three of four years is to not cut the meat into too many steaks. Instead of steaks, I have been saving a lot of time by making large and clean cuts for roasts. This way I can cut a thawed roast if I want steaks. I do the same with some of the neck meat, and the rest of it I turn to stew meat. The back-straps and tenderloins are the first to be processed, since hanging these too long dries the meat too deep. There aren't restrictions relating to "deboning" the meat in the areas I hunt, so we remove the meat as a whole piece from one side of the neck, and then the other. We do the same with the rib meat, but this is used for hamburger. I have been thinking of doing something with the rib meat somebody told me about:

"start rolling the rib meat by slicing along the smallest rib over the stomach, then make another cut along the edge of the following rib and roll the meat some more, and then the next rib and the next until you get to the last rib by the shoulder."

But I haven't had the patience to learn how to do that. We just skin one side of the moose after slicing the hide from the neck to the "tail," and also the slice from the knees at each leg to the center cut (the one from head to tail). This cuts are much like the ones done on a bear or a deer.

Then we skin the hide on the up side of the moose (whichever side is up), from the stomach all the way to or past the spine. We also skin the same "up side" of the neck. Then we remove that side's back-strap since we don't want to get any dirt on it, followed by both legs on that side, the neck meat on that side, and as much meat covering the ribs on that side (but not the meat between the ribs). Almost forgot: the evidence of sex is kept attached to one of the legs, but the whole thing is contained in a small and strong plastic bag that is held in place with a large plastic wire-bundle tie. This way urine and such can get on the meat.

At this point, my hunting partner-who is the expert on this matters-makes a very careful cut at the base along the spine (by the smallest rib/stomach area), and through this cut he feels the tenderloin on that side of the moose. With a very short blade he cuts the front end of the tenderloin, grabs this end of it with his hand, and pulls it out of the moose through the cut by the small rib. This was quite amazing when I saw it for the first time since I didn't know it was possible

Now we either stretch the hide we have skinned off, and roll the moose on it with the ATV winches. If the hide is contaminated or dirty, then we place a new and clean tarp over the hide and roll the moose on it. We skin this other side, remove the back strap, legs, neck meat, some of the meat over the ribs, and the tenderloin.

All that is left now is the meat between the ribs. At this point one has to decide if cutting the whole rib cage out, or just the meat between the ribs. But this meat I usually slice off the ribs with a very short and sharp blade (a small fillet knife I have for this purpose). We roll the rib cage to that the sternum or chest is facing up, then open the lining that holds the entrails in place, the stomach and intestines flow out of the carcass (or we move it out), which in turn creates some room for slicing up/down along the ribs to cut the meat out.
--------
To non-Alaskan hunters: Keep in mind that in a lot of areas of Alaska deboning the meat is not allowed. It means that one has to cut and remove the rib cage with the meat attached, and also the neck and legs with the meat attached. The last thing that is carried out to the truck or the airplane is the antler. The antler must be carried out of the field with all the meat, never when there is still meat left behind.

Last edited by RayinAK; 01-28-2011 at 03:26 PM..
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Old 01-28-2011, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,171 posts, read 27,428,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Griz View Post

...
I have used the older Lubalox-coated 230-grain FS to kill moose, the 250-grain Partition factory load at 2,660 fps plus the HE load at 2,800 fps, and at least one 250-grain A-Frame. All have killed my moose. But the 225-grain TSX has become my favorite for the past five years or so.

I like the .375 H&H. It's quite a nice cartridge, but I have gotten used to the .338, and am too old and stubborn to change now. Once you develop a liking for something is hard to give it up
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Old 01-28-2011, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,171 posts, read 27,428,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimboburnsy View Post
If you ever get the opportunity to kill a feral hog, brain it. Adrenaline and cortisone seem to have a profound effect on the meat's suitability as table fare (based on my own experience, of course). Don't let anyone tell you that a gnarly boar isn't fine eating. The little ones are the best, but I think a 200-300 pounder is great for grilling and ribs if he/she was a "no squeal kill". I hadn't really considered the possibility that this could also be true of antelope species. I think most people avoid the big pigs because they are difficult to clean, but I gather that this shouldn't be an issue for a moose hunter.
A was watching a TV show where this guy was traveling from place to place around the US to hunt (guided) different game animals, including wild hugs. The hugs would be shot on the head with very accurate rifles. The shot was taken at the base of the ear, or just the forehead killing the pig instantly. At the end of the hunt the animal would be cooked (roasted) to perfection. That show was quite interesting since half of it related to preparing and cooking the meat outdoors.
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Old 01-28-2011, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,850 posts, read 19,592,282 times
Reputation: 6479
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
Glitch,

What I have been doing for the past three of four years is to not cut the meat into too many steaks. Instead of steaks, I have been saving a lot of time by making large and clean cuts for roasts. This way I can cut a thawed roast if I want steaks. I do the same with some of the neck meat, and the rest of it I turn to stew meat. The back-straps and tenderloins are the first to be processed, since hanging these too long dries the meat too deep. There aren't restrictions relating to "deboning" the meat in the areas I hunt, so we remove the meat as a whole piece from one side of the neck, and then the other. We do the same with the rib meat, but this is used for hamburger. I have been thinking of doing something with the rib meat somebody told me about:

"start rolling the rib meat by slicing along the smallest rib over the stomach, then make another cut along the edge of the following rib and roll the meat some more, and then the next rib and the next until you get to the last rib by the shoulder."

But I haven't had the patience to learn how to do that. We just skin one side of the moose after slicing the hide from the neck to the "tail," and also the slice from the knees at each leg to the center cut (the one from head to tail). This cuts are much like the ones done on a bear or a deer.

Then we skin the hide on the up side of the moose (whichever side is up), from the stomach all the way to or past the spine. We also skin the same "up side" of the neck. Then we remove that side's back-strap since we don't want to get any dirt on it, followed by both legs on that side, the neck meat on that side, and as much meat covering the ribs on that side (but not the meat between the ribs). Almost forgot: the evidence of sex is kept attached to one of the legs, but the whole thing is contained in a small and strong plastic bag that is held in place with a large plastic wire-bundle tie. This way urine and such can get on the meat.

At this point, my hunting partner-who is the expert on this matters-makes a very careful cut at the base along the spine (by the smallest rib/stomach area), and through this cut he feels the tenderloin on that side of the moose. With a very short blade he cuts the front end of the tenderloin, grabs this end of it with his hand, and pulls it out of the moose through the cut by the small rib. This was quite amazing when I saw it for the first time since I didn't know it was possible

Now we either stretch the hide we have skinned off, and roll the moose on it with the ATV winches. If the hide is contaminated or dirty, then we place a new and clean tarp over the hide and roll the moose on it. We skin this other side, remove the back strap, legs, neck meat, some of the meat over the ribs, and the tenderloin.

All that is left now is the meat between the ribs. At this point one has to decide if cutting the whole rib cage out, or just the meat between the ribs. But this meat I usually slice off the ribs with a very short and sharp blade (a small fillet knife I have for this purpose). We roll the rib cage to that the sternum or chest is facing up, then open the lining that holds the entrails in place, the stomach and intestines flow out of the carcass (or we move it out), which in turn creates some room for slicing up/down along the ribs to cut the meat out.
--------
To non-Alaskan hunters: Keep in mind that in a lot of areas of Alaska deboning the meat is not allowed. It means that one has to cut and remove the rib cage with the meat attached, and also the neck and legs with the meat attached. The last thing that is carried out to the truck or the airplane is the antler. The antler must be carried out of the field with all the meat, never when there is still meat left behind.
Wow! Lots of good information.

I have never deboned in the field. I packed out the entire critter, hide, antlers and all. I also do not own an ATV. I use to use a tarp, like you do, but I had a come-along to help me roll the moose when one side was completed. Then I removed the hide from the other side. I then cut up the moose in about 6 or 8 pieces (usually the 4 quarters, plus the ribs and spine are in 2 or 3 pieces, and the neck). Each piece goes into a game bag (except for the antlers of course), and is as much as I can carry out, so I had to make 6 or 8 round trips to pack out the entire moose. The neck, antlers, and hide (and tarp) are the last things I pack out. I was always very mindful of how far I traveled from my pickup. I tried to stay within a mile of the vehicle, if possible. The only thing I left behind was the pile of entrails and a few internal organs. I keep the heart, but I leave behind the liver, lungs, and kidneys.

When I get the moose home and start cutting up the more managable pieces over the course of the next couple weeks, I have two "waste" piles: One for the fat and bones, and another for the bits and pieces of good meat that was trimmed off the roast or steak. The fat gets tossed, and the bones go to the dogs (but not all at once). I use the bits and pieces of trimmings for hamburger (or is it mooseburger? ). For stew meat, I typically cut up part or all of a rump roast. I usually make more roasts than stews, that is why.
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Old 01-28-2011, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Denver
1,788 posts, read 1,871,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
The .375 H&H is the minimum for certain animals in Africa. But a lot of people hunt plains games with all sorts of calibers, including the .30-06, .300, and .338WM.

Does any of your friends or relatives own a .338WM rifle? If so, you can always shoot it a few times at the range to get an idea how it feels to you. However, through the years I have found that if you find a gunsmith or gun dealer who knows how important "fitting" the rifle to you is, buy it or just use those ideas to choose your own rifle. The gunsmith should measure things while you shoulder the rifle: the distance from your shoulder (or stock's butt) to the rifle's trigger, the distance from your eye to the scope's eyepiece, etc. You don't want the scope to hit your eyebrow when the rifle is fired, so the stock's length from your shoulder to the trigger is very important, and so the scope's eye relief. The one on my .338, a Leupold, has just about 4" eye relief, and the trigger pull distance is long enough (but not too long) for it to never hit my eyebrow.

Lightweight rifles tend to kick harder than the same but heavier ones.
True enough. I never noticed the recoil when hunting though. What I do notice is the weight of a cannon on my shoulder, while traveling at high altitudes. An extra two pounds is a lot when exerting yourself.

Some guys like to sit, some like to walk. Both have their pros and cons.
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Old 01-28-2011, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
2,257 posts, read 3,169,580 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
A was watching a TV show where this guy was traveling from place to place around the US to hunt (guided) different game animals, including wild hugs. The hugs would be shot on the head with very accurate rifles. The shot was taken at the base of the ear, or just the forehead killing the pig instantly. At the end of the hunt the animal would be cooked (roasted) to perfection. That show was quite interesting since half of it related to preparing and cooking the meat outdoors.
..

....this is about game cookin' in camp...................Back in Colorado in the '50s and '60s, you were allowed one deer for "camp meat" in addition to what ever other tags you had. Since we had the same camping spot every year, we had a hole dug (in the summer) in the earth (about 4' long x 2' wide x 3' deep), that we used every fall in huntin' camp to "slow roast a deer".

First day in camp we'd start burning pieces of Larch (closest thing to 'hard-wood in the CO mountains) in the hole and keep it up (about 24 hrs).. until we had about 18 inches of glowing "coals" . Having taken a doe early on day one, we'd skin her; gut 'er out; pepper her all over; cut the legs off at the knee and hang her in a tree.

Day #2: slather her with a couple of gallons of home-made BBQ sauce....(one main ingredient--about a 5th of Jack Daniels) (while she's laying on several layers of cheese cloth), which in turn is laying.... on about 14 layers of wet newspaper, which in turn is laying on a tarp, on which are about (10), five foot long lengths of Bailing Wire.

You got her covered (inside and out) real good with the Sauce...now finish wraping her with the Cheese cloth.....and another gallon or two of Sauce is slathered all over the Cheese Cloth....(good and soaked)....now you finish wraping this "slathered" package with the wet (Heavily dampened) news paper and then finally tie her off about every 6 inches with the Bailing Wire.

----(sometimes we'd put several Idaho Potatos, a few Acorn Squash and a couple of Brooke Trout (all individually seasoned & wrapped in foil), in the body cavidity before the Cheesecloth Wraping.----

Put her in the hole on top of the glowing coals ...AND IMMEDIATELY cover the hole with a 6' x 4' piece of heavy Corrogated Sheet Metal. Quickly Seal off the edges of the sheet metal ...(or other suitable piece of steel).. with earth and then continue to put about 6 inches of earth on top. Make sure no air (oxygen) can get into the hole. The Newspaper will not burn....it will char a little,...but no problem. No oxygen = no flame!!

About 12 to 18** hours later......you've got a "feast fit for a King"!
** weather dependent.....
It sounds more complicated than it is in reality. And yes, when we broke camp, we'd cover the hole up with the steel and some logs....to be used again in the future.
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Old 01-28-2011, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,171 posts, read 27,428,664 times
Reputation: 11838
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
Wow! Lots of good information.

I have never deboned in the field. I packed out the entire critter, hide, antlers and all. I also do not own an ATV. I use to use a tarp, like you do, but I had a come-along to help me roll the moose when one side was completed. Then I removed the hide from the other side. I then cut up the moose in about 6 or 8 pieces (usually the 4 quarters, plus the ribs and spine are in 2 or 3 pieces, and the neck). Each piece goes into a game bag (except for the antlers of course), and is as much as I can carry out, so I had to make 6 or 8 round trips to pack out the entire moose. The neck, antlers, and hide (and tarp) are the last things I pack out. I was always very mindful of how far I traveled from my pickup. I tried to stay within a mile of the vehicle, if possible. The only thing I left behind was the pile of entrails and a few internal organs. I keep the heart, but I leave behind the liver, lungs, and kidneys.

When I get the moose home and start cutting up the more managable pieces over the course of the next couple weeks, I have two "waste" piles: One for the fat and bones, and another for the bits and pieces of good meat that was trimmed off the roast or steak. The fat gets tossed, and the bones go to the dogs (but not all at once). I use the bits and pieces of trimmings for hamburger (or is it mooseburger? ). For stew meat, I typically cut up part or all of a rump roast. I usually make more roasts than stews, that is why.
Yes, whatever works is fine as long as the meat is kept clean, cools and dry. But the only way to cool it faster is by removing the hide right away. Moose meat is delicious and very nutritious. That's what I tell my wife, but since she does not like it as much as I do, she gives me these weird looks when I slurp the moose stew meals she cooks
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