U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Alaska
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 03-02-2011, 01:22 PM
 
15,561 posts, read 14,664,077 times
Reputation: 6544
Oh, look at this quote from Dave Straub in the interview where he was talking about how much he loved working with dogs:

Quote:
What mental or emotional attributes do you require in your dogs?
Dogs are trained, so as they are introduced to running they respond and love to be traveling. Personalities are what I most identify with for Example; A timid dog is usually a smart dog, smart enough to want to avoid you. As it may seem to be a fault but my BEST LEADERS are timid.
Too bad the dogs the prick killed weren't able to avoid him. I heard that some of the dogs who managed to survive his "care" would walk in circles for weeks afterwards because they had never had any life besides being chained to a post.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-02-2011, 01:30 PM
 
Location: In a time warp
774 posts, read 752,599 times
Reputation: 775
People who abuse animals deserve to be abused themselves, with extreme prejudice.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2011, 01:32 PM
 
15,561 posts, read 14,664,077 times
Reputation: 6544
More about David Straub

David Straub animal cruelty casefile

this is the most disgusting part of this whole thing besides the conditions that his dogs were found in:

Quote:
Last October, Buser said, he received several calls from other mushers saying the borough was "taking David's dogs away ... the typical frantic phone calling of that's not right, blah blah blah."
So other local mushers were standing up for the prick. That sounds about right. I never liked those people when I lived among them.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2011, 01:35 PM
 
15,561 posts, read 14,664,077 times
Reputation: 6544
More of these fine upstanding people:

Remarks on the Iditarod

Quote:
Dogs skinned for parka ruffs and mittens

"....As a dog handler myself, I rescued two old Iditarod stars before their owner ended their fame with a shot to the brain. Culling unwanted dogs is an on-going mushers' practice and one racer had numerous pits full of dead dogs from puppies to oldsters--- some skinned for parka ruffs and mittens!"

- Mike Cranford, Two Rivers, Alaska
- The Bush Blade Newspaper, serving Cook Inlet and Bush Alaska, March, 2000, website article
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2011, 01:36 PM
 
15,561 posts, read 14,664,077 times
Reputation: 6544
I have a question for the OP. Why were the words "ethics" and "dog sledding" used in the same sentence?

Remarks on the Iditarod

Quote:
Dogs skinned to make hats and mittens:

"At one Iditarod and Yukon Quest veteran kennel, there was a dog who wasn't very fast. Like many sled dogs, he lived on a short chain with nothing but a cruddy dog house and a rusty food bowl for company.

Sometimes, he was whipped in harness with pine branches or "bumped" with the all terrain vehicle he and his teammates were pulling (meaning the mushers hooked him up closest to the machine and then sped up to hit his backside). His owners didn't care much for him, as he was not the best worker and was also neutered – thus he had no value as a breeding animal. His owners often talked about shooting him if he didn't shape up.

One day, I was told that I had to accompany this dog to the veterinarian to "see what happened to dogs that didn't make the cut." Without a physical examination or owner counseling, this dog was simply euthanized because he was too slow. He was perfectly healthy, and indeed could have made a great team dog on a recreational team.

The dogs body was taken back to the mushers' home and placed in a larger freezer (where meat for dog food was stored). I was then shown a pair of mittens that were made from a previous sled dog who wasn't fast enough. I was told that it's important to kill them (sled dogs) when they are young, because their pelts (fur coats) are in better condition and will make better garments."

- Ashley Keith, former musher and Iditarod kennel employee who now rescues and rehabilitates abused sled dogs
- Email to the Sled Dog Action Coalition, April 30, 2008
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2011, 01:43 PM
 
15,561 posts, read 14,664,077 times
Reputation: 6544
Disgusting.

Quote:
No veterinary care for sick and injured dogs:

"Because there are so many dogs in the larger kennels, handlers just clean up the poop and give the dogs food, so the socialization aspect is definitely lacking along with personal care for toenails, grooming, etc. In these kennels, handlers don't know the individual dogs well and often don't recognize when the dogs are sick. Also, most handlers don't stay long and don't get to know the dogs. The dogs that get the most attention are those who run the fastest.

The dogs don't always get vet care when they are sick or injured. And it is cheaper to just let the dog die. God forbid parvo or something like that ever hit one of these places - it would be a mess. With some dogs, mushers have a 'wait and see' policy. It's horrid to see the dogs sitting there in obvious discomfort, let me tell you. The more valuable dogs get better vet care."

- Ashley Keith, former musher and Iditarod kennel employee who now rescues and rehabilitates abused sled dogs
- Email to the Sled Dog Action Coalition, April 28, 2007
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2011, 01:51 PM
 
15,561 posts, read 14,664,077 times
Reputation: 6544
More about the stellar ethics of these creeps:

Quote:
Few sled dogs are adopted

"She [Marcie Moriarty] added the SPCA has always maintained it is difficult to find adoptive homes for sled dogs because of the way they are raised and kept on tethers."

- Marcie Moriarty is the SPCA's head animal cruelty investigator in British Columbia.
- Sam Cooper, The Province, February 2, 2011


"So far this spring, the shelter [the North Star Borough Animal Shelter] has reached its maximum at 25 huskies. In one week, three were put to death. Five were adopted, which is encouraging but it's very rare to have that many find homes in one week, said Sandy Klimaschesky, the lead animal tender at the shelter.

Sometimes because the shelter is so full, some dogs go right from the front door to be euthanized, she said."

"But the facts are that each year, more than 1,000 sled dogs wind up at the shelter and of those, only about a third are adopted."

- Associated Press, Anchorage Daily News, May 7, 2007

[From the Sled Dog Action Coalition: The Fairbanks North Star Borough is one of 32 geographic areas listed by the United States Census Bureau.]
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2011, 01:58 PM
 
15,561 posts, read 14,664,077 times
Reputation: 6544
Oh look...another one of those pesky little "isolated incidents".

Alaskan Malamute Assistance League Home Page

Quote:
On January 10th 157 malamute-husky mixes and malamutes were seized from Frank Rich, a puppy miller, near Talkeetna, Alaska. The dogs were found starving and with no water, 19 dogs were found dead. They were all hauled to the Matanuska-Susitna Borough Animal Control facility near Palmer - a journey short of 100 miles. During their travel to the Animal Control facility 6 puppies were born.

The dogs showed exaggerated signs of dehydration and all the animals were at “level 1” on the body conditioning scale meaning all had bony prominences evident from a distance, no discernible body fat and obvious loss of muscle mass. Half of the dogs brought in needed fluid therapy. All needed immunizations, deworming and basic blood work and some topical delousing. What should have been a 60 pound dog was 20 pounds.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2011, 02:03 PM
 
431 posts, read 314,584 times
Reputation: 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
Disgusting.
I totally agree. My experience in equestrian circles is that horses are often abused, sheltered under atrocious conditions, and worked too hard. Lots of stupid people working with horses. On the other hand lots of us enjoy our horses and understand proper animal husbandry and competition can coexist. In dog-sledding I'm sure there are a few slimebags like you mentioned, but aren't there some really competitive kennels like Comeback Kennel where they truly do care about the welfare of their animals?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2011, 02:07 PM
 
15,561 posts, read 14,664,077 times
Reputation: 6544
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArcticState View Post
I totally agree. My experience in equestrian circles is that horses are often abused, sheltered under atrocious conditions, and worked too hard. Lots of stupid people working with horses. On the other hand lots of us enjoy our horses and understand proper animal husbandry and competition can coexist. In dog-sledding I'm sure there are a few slimebags like you mentioned, but aren't there some really competitive kennels like Comeback Kennel where they truly do care about the welfare of their animals?
I think that there are some good ones out there. But I strongly disagree that the "bad ones" are simply isolated incidents. Culling et al seems to be the norm in this industry.

(As far as the Iditarod itself...the original in the 1920's was a relay. Might be nice if they could stay true to that history.)

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/sled+dogs+slaughtered+Whistler+when+tourism+slumpe d+Report/4196610/story.html (broken link)

Quote:
“There is a problem with the sled dog industry in general. People see these 20 sled dogs, an idyllic setting with snow in the background and think how great. But what they don’t see is the 200 dogs tethered and sleeping out back, chained to a barrel.”


I agree completely with the above statement.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $79,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Alaska

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top