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Old 09-21-2011, 11:34 AM
 
431 posts, read 329,954 times
Reputation: 430
\___ oh brother.
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Old 09-22-2011, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Birmingham, Alabama
1,976 posts, read 1,817,871 times
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^ I don't get it.

Yeah, Thompson Pass is questionable for sure, although in Warpt's video it looked less treacherous than a mountain pass here in the winter, believe it or not! 'Course, the passes here are really high sometimes. The elevation at Thompson Pass is about the elevation that I live at. So that's a big difference of course with the latitude and everything. I'm thinking that I will keep an eye on the weather, and keep the Valdez portion of the trip open, but only if driving conditions are good at the Pass. Even then, I would hate to get stuck.

As far as keeping gear in your car in winter, it may be overkill, but I do it here. Because sometimes I travel to the remote reaches of the deep, high mountains in winter and there is nobody around to help, so gotta be prepared. I keep tire chains, cold weather clothing, blankets, non-perishable food, a collapsible snow shovel, a battery jumping thing (don't know what that's actually called, but it jumps your battery off for you), and a bag of either sand or ice-melt. Overkill most of the time, but it has come in handy a couple times.

Pretty much my only remaining question at this point is regarding clothing. While in the interior, I don't plan to spend long periods of time outside. I just don't have the clothes for it, and that would add another possible $1000 to my trip. I can buy that stuff later (I think). The clothes that I own will be sufficient for southcentral, except I need to get a couple of things. But I've lived in conditions like those in southcentral, so that shouldn't be too bad a shock. It's the interior I'm worried about. If the Lights are out, I will want to watch them, but that's going to suck if I don't have enough clothes. Are there any basic clothing items I can get affordably that would help me out in the interior? And should I get them here/on the internet or in Alaska? I know Alaskans will have the knowledge, but they will have higher prices, too.

Well, I'm working on this still, while still keeping my personal life in order. It looks like there's a fairly good chance of it working out at this point. Here's hoping!

Oh, and guys, flying to bush villages. From researching prices, I could afford to fly out to a bush village or two and check it out, but I want to know if it would even be a good idea. I mean, I won't know anyone there, and there won't be a whole lot to do other than explore the uniqueness of the place (and I might not be dressed for it if I'm not careful!). So, what do you think, worth going for the experience, or just leave that off the trip and only visit places I think I might live in?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moose Whisperer View Post
Huh?

Despite what the TV show implies, they do drive all year round.
Yeah, I was just talking about the winter road trucking industry. I'm sure they run year-round, since there's a road. But over in Canada (and yes I got interested in this from the show, but I learned about it from reading), their winter roads are just tracks they plow over soggy, mushy tundra-ish ground (which freezes of course), and once the temps are high enough the roads disappear. But you probably know all this. It's just that the articles I've read point to the winter road trucking coming to an end probably before the end of my lifetime. That eliminates a large portion of the year for the North Country, so it would make it harder to get hired as a driver, methinks.

Last edited by ShipOfFools42; 09-22-2011 at 02:14 PM..
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Old 09-22-2011, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Point Hope Alaska
4,323 posts, read 1,358,643 times
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Quote:
Oh, and guys, flying to bush villages. From researching prices, I could afford to fly out to a bush village or two and check it out, but I want to know if it would even be a good idea. I mean, I won't know anyone there, and there won't be a whole lot to do other than explore the uniqueness of the place (and I might not be dressed for it if I'm not careful!). So, what do you think, worth going for the experience, or just leave that off the trip and only visit places I think I might live in?
People do this all the time. That is one of the beauties of living in the arctic. You do not need to know anyone. Someone (many) will be happy just to have company and "come eat" is the most popular thing you will hear from complete strangers (natives). They will take darn good care of you or any other visitor. It happens all the time. People just show up - from France, or many other countries in boats and small crafts they sail from other parts of the world.

Pt. Lay had two characters that sailed over from England in their small sailboat. They worked at the camp as cooks for years.

You have all the proper clothing to survive almost any condition in the state.

The only two things you really need are an eskimo parky - Nothing manufactured can compete. A pair of bunny boots. All other clothing is regular stuff that most people have.

Good ski pants are only used when it gets down to - 30 and below unless you are going on a snowmachine ride for long distances.

Long johns are a no no. They are too tight. Many layers of very loose clothing. Dirty clothes cannot keep you warm.

Everyone in the arctic dresses basiclly the same. Men & women.

After basic undergarments the first most important piece of clothing is / are gym shorts. then sweat pants then your jeans. Final layer is ski pants (if needed)

The torso is the same after basic undergarments. a couple of flannel shirts a sweater, a hooded sweat shirt then a spring jacket. Final layer is eskimo parky. NO zippers. THE WIND penetrates those too easily.

If you purchase some skins. lining. Many people will be only too happy to make a parky for you. Point Hope is known for the best looking parkies on the whole slope.

That will only set you back a couple of hundred to have the parky made. NO measurments are ever taken. They know just by looking at you how big to make it. Now you need fur for the ruff. & cuffs. Wolverine is the only fur to use. The other furs will keep your face wet and cold if it is raining or snowing or *blowing snow(*all the time).

One shake and wolverine is all dry and warm again. That is expensive fur to purchase it if you can find it. A beaver hat is a must to own. They are expensive as in $250. Dressed properly you can easily sleep outside as the hunters do in - 50 below with no tents outside for weeks without getting cold!
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Old 09-22-2011, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Bethel, Alaska
20,991 posts, read 21,865,718 times
Reputation: 12054
Ship, don't forget to rub snot on your face to prevent frost bite if you venture from your car.
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Old 09-22-2011, 05:01 PM
 
3,650 posts, read 3,804,796 times
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Just my .02's and IMHO:

Ship - I would get your CDL. It is something that you can always use. You can transfer your CDL to Alaska as Blueflames pointed out. Physicals are needed everywhere, so nothing new there. I read the rules fro needing a CDL in Alaska and they look very, very similar to Florida. You already know how to drive in ice/snow so whatever test the company gives you should be no big deal to you.

Pilot's licenses are expensive, from what I have researched and questions I have asked, a "lower 48" Pilot's license doesn't cut it in Alaska. You need additional hours of training/flying with an instructor in Alaska to be able to fly there. Why not just do the course there? I would rather do my initial learning in the environment I will be flying in anyways.

These are just my thoughts and not trying to sound preachy... Obviously you will do what you think is best for you. Taking into consideration what you can obtain where you currently live.
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Old 09-22-2011, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Point Hope Alaska
4,323 posts, read 1,358,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by warptman View Post
Ship, don't forget to rub snot on your face to prevent frost bite if you venture from your car.
Why ??? do you constantly continue to twist my words and make things up?

It is the one sure sign of your immaturity !

Yet you continue to advertise what type of 'character' you possess!

Grow up little boy & go play out!
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Old 09-22-2011, 05:41 PM
 
3,650 posts, read 3,804,796 times
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Hopefully you get to see this!!!!

Taken from the International Space Station.
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Old 09-22-2011, 05:55 PM
 
Location: on top of a mountain
7,016 posts, read 6,597,991 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by warptman View Post
Ship, don't forget to rub snot on your face to prevent frost bite if you venture from your car.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SityData View Post
Why ??? do you constantly continue to twist my words and make things up?

It is the one sure sign of your immaturity !

Yet you continue to advertise what type of 'character' you possess!

Grow up little boy & go play out!
well if rubbing snot on your hands as you recommend SityData to prevent frost bite works ,then why would it not work for rubbing it on one's face????
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Old 09-22-2011, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Point Hope Alaska
4,323 posts, read 1,358,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueflames50 View Post
well if rubbing snot on your hands as you recommend SityData to prevent frost bite works ,then why would it not work for rubbing it on one's face????
It does work, but it is not something you would ever do if you just ventured outside of your car! That is ridiculous, and it wasn't even close to what I said it was used for.
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Old 09-22-2011, 06:13 PM
 
Location: on top of a mountain
7,016 posts, read 6,597,991 times
Reputation: 3133
Quote:
Originally Posted by SityData View Post
It does work, but it is not something you would ever do if you just ventured outside of your car! That is ridiculous, and it wasn't even close to what I said it was used for.
you said to blow ones nose snot on ones hands to warm them many times here on this forum...why would it not work on ones face??? ..why is this ridiculous??...obviously you need to explain in more detail as this does not make sense as to what it is used for....
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