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Old 06-28-2013, 08:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
And you know very little about mining, but I still don't try to demean you.

That said, the oil and mining industries provide most of the Alaska revenue. The fishing fleets aren't are moved back to the lower-48 when the season is over.
I used to work at a mine. It was interesting. They really tried to hire locally, but it was difficult because a lot of local people didn't want to stay out at camp because it would mean being away from their families, even though the rotation schedules they offered could be pretty flexible for most jobs. Like most mines in Alaska, the majority of the workforce was from the lower 48.

I think that Alaska could negotiate a better deal with the parent company here.

If you're interested, do some research on why so much of Alaska's mineral rights are owned by Canada.

Last edited by Metlakatla; 06-28-2013 at 08:21 PM..
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Old 06-28-2013, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
I used to work at a mine. It was interesting. They really tried to hire locally, but it was difficult because a lot of local people didn't want to stay out at camp because it would mean being away from their families, even though the rotation schedules they offered could be pretty flexible for most jobs. Like most mines in Alaska, the majority of the workforce was from the lower 48.

I think that Alaska could negotiate a better deal with the parent company here.

If you are interested, do some research on why so much of Alaska's mineral rights are owned by Canada.
Unlike some other States, in Alaska mineral rights are primarily owned by the Federal Government, a portion by the State, and another portion by Alaska Natives. But regardless of who owns such, the borough where the mine exists receives a huge amount of money in property taxes. The highest the yearly assessment for the property, the more money for the borough. The majority of the workforce in the mining operations around Fairbanks is comprised by Alaskans and people from the lower-48 who move to Alaska, or just petroleum and mining engineers who graduate at UAF. And yes, since the mining companies are from Canada, a large portion of the management personnel are Canadians. The same happens when an American company operates in Canada.

That said, unlike the fishing and tourism industries, mining and oil operations take place year round, and that's why Alaska benefits so much from both. But in regards to the Pebble mine, it's up to the AK officials involved in the process to achieve deals that benefit Alaska, although this can only be done to a point where the mining operation can take place with a profit.

Last edited by RayinAK; 06-28-2013 at 09:44 PM..
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Old 06-28-2013, 10:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
Unlike some other States, in Alaska mineral rights are primarily owned by the Federal Government, a portion by the State, and another portion by Alaska Natives. But regardless of who owns such, the borough where the mine exists receives a huge amount of money in property taxes. The highest the yearly assessment for the property, the more money for the borough. The majority of the workforce in the mining operations around Fairbanks is comprised by Alaskans and people from the lower-48 who move to Alaska, or just petroleum and mining engineers who graduate at UAF. And yes, since the mining companies are from Canada, a large portion of the management personnel are Canadians. The same happens when an American company operates in Canada.

That said, unlike the fishing and tourism industries, mining and oil operations take place year round, and that's why Alaska benefits so much from both. But in regards to the Pebble mine, it's up to the AK officials involved in the process to achieve deals that benefit Alaska.
Pebble is on state owned property. Years ago, a glitch occurred in mining law that left a lot of Canadians holding the mineral rights to state owned property. This happened before statehood; it could, I suppose, be argued that Alaska's state constitution negates these old foreign claims. Again, I personally believe that Alaska can and should negotiate a better deal with the parent company. Whatever happened to the resources of Alaska belonging to its residents? Wasn't that a provision of statehood? I know that it's much more complex than that, but this mine just seems another continuation of what's always happened in Alaska and what those who fought for statehood sought to prevent.

I'm curious, though, about why it's such an either/or issue with you? I can think of a couple of mines located right in prime salmon ground that haven't had a negative impact on the runs. Most people don't even know they're there. Granted, they're much smaller than the proposed Pebble project will be and they aren't open-pit. I think that there are ways that all of the industries that you've mentioned can coexist.

Tourism -ppfft. A lot of that money goes south, and a lot of it stays in the state. I doubt that Bernie Carl out there at Chena would agree with you about tourism being a seasonal deal, btw; winter tourism is huge in parts of Alaska. I know people who work 3-4 months a year in tipped positions in tourism and spend the rest of the year laying up in Europe.

A lot of people would also tell you that year-round jobs don't necessarily mean prosperity and stability. As I mentioned earlier, Petsersburg had the highest per capita income in the nation for a number of years, and still doesn't fare too shabbily. There's a lot to be said for cramming a year's worth of work into a few short months and spending the rest of the year enjoying your life, your family and your community. It's a pretty good way to live.
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Old 06-28-2013, 11:05 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
15,695 posts, read 25,308,395 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
Pebble is on state owned property. Years ago, a glitch occurred in mining law that left a lot of Canadians holding the mineral rights to state owned property. This happened before statehood; it could, I suppose, be argued that Alaska's state constitution negates these old foreign claims. Again, I personally believe that Alaska can and should negotiate a better deal with the parent company. Whatever happened to the resources of Alaska belonging to its residents? Wasn't that a provision of statehood? I know that it's much more complex than that, but this mine just seems another continuation of what's always happened in Alaska and what those who fought for statehood sought to prevent.

I'm curious, though, about why it's such an either/or issue with you? I can think of a couple of mines located right in prime salmon ground that haven't had a negative impact on the runs. Most people don't even know they're there. Granted, they're much smaller than the proposed Pebble project will be and they aren't open-pit. I think that there are ways that all of the industries that you've mentioned can coexist.

Tourism -ppfft. A lot of that money goes south, and a lot of it stays in the state. I doubt that Bernie Carl out there at Chena would agree with you about tourism being a seasonal deal, btw; winter tourism is huge in parts of Alaska. I know people who work 3-4 months a year in tipped positions in tourism and spend the rest of the year laying up in Europe.

A lot of people would also tell you that year-round jobs don't necessarily mean prosperity and stability. As I mentioned earlier, Petsersburg had the highest per capita income in the nation for a number of years, and still doesn't fare too shabbily. There's a lot to be said for cramming a year's worth of work into a few short months and spending the rest of the year enjoying your life, your family and your community. It's a pretty good way to live.
I would very well like to see the whole of Alaska belonging to Alaskans, but that's not the case. Over 65% of Alaska is owned by the Federal Government. The remainder is owned by Alaska Natives, and the State. The dealings with the corporations who will develop the mine are being conducted by the State agencies that are responsible for such.

I have never said in this thread that the mine is an issue with me. I am just stating my opinions like you and other posters have.

Most of the tourism taking place in Alaska is in fact seasonal. We still have some tourism during the winter, mostly at the Chena Hot Springs resort. But the big tourism I am referring to, the one that makes a big difference, happens during the summer months, and the tour companies are not from here. You won't see Princess buses around here during the winter. The same for the fishing industry, as the fishing fleets leave Alaska once the fishing season is over.

But the oil and mining industries pay property tax and employ people year round, and that's where most of the State and borough revenues come from. The same can be said for the big stores in town, from Walmart to Home Depot. The employment takes place year round, and property plus other taxes, too. Another huge source of revenue comes from the Federal Government and the military.
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Old 06-28-2013, 11:30 PM
 
19,000 posts, read 24,525,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
I would very well like to see the whole of Alaska belonging to Alaskans, but that's not the case. Over 65% of Alaska is owned by the Federal Government. The remainder is owned by Alaska Natives, and the State. The dealings with the corporations who will develop the mine are being conducted by the State agencies that are responsible for such.

I have never said in this thread that the mine is an issue with me. I am just stating my opinions like you and other posters have.

Most of the tourism taking place in Alaska is in fact seasonal. We still have some tourism during the winter, mostly at the Chena Hot Springs resort. But the big tourism I am referring to, and the one that makes a difference happens during the summer months, and the tour companies are not from here. You won't see Princess buses around here during the winter. The same for the fishing industry, as the fishing fleets leave Alaska once the fishing season is over.

But the oil and mining industries pay property tax and employ people year round, and that's where most of the State and borough revenues come from. The same can be said for the big stores in town, from Walmart to Home Depot. The employment takes place year round, and property plus other taxes, too. Another huge source of revenue comes from the Federal Government and the military.
What are fishing fleets, Ray? Most of the SE Alaska seiners run down to Washington waters after salmon season is over in Alaska, and then turn and head for home when Washington's done. I think you might be confusing the big processing trawlers with individual fishing boats. Tell me again how Petersburg has one of the highest national standards of living and yet doesn't have a traditional economic base of year-round jobs? I really doubt that you understand the extent that coastal villages depend on the fishing industry or how many FV owners live in these communities. Yeah, it's not Fairbanks or Anchorage, but there actually are people who think that Alaska isn't just about the urban communities.

Bernie Carl and Chena notwithstanding, there are plenty of smaller enterprises in Alaska profiting from winter tourism, from the Petersville Roadhouse to the Fairbanks Princess to the Iditarod. I'd guess that a greater proportion of winter tourism dollars actually stays in the state.

My point is, again, that there should be room for all of it.
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Old 06-29-2013, 02:28 AM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
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I agree with you that there should be room for all of it, mining, fishing, tourism, and so on.
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Old 06-29-2013, 01:36 PM
 
Location: "Out there" in Alaska.
305 posts, read 517,643 times
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How many U.S. companies are involved in natural resource development in Canada? How many U.S. workers are employed in Canada compared to Canadians working in the U.S.?
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Old 06-29-2013, 01:46 PM
 
Location: AK
843 posts, read 1,544,375 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
Unlike some other States, in Alaska mineral rights are primarily owned by the Federal Government, a portion by the State, and another portion by Alaska Natives. But regardless of who owns such, the borough where the mine exists receives a huge amount of money in property taxes. The highest the yearly assessment for the property, the more money for the borough. The majority of the workforce in the mining operations around Fairbanks is comprised by Alaskans and people from the lower-48 who move to Alaska, or just petroleum and mining engineers who graduate at UAF. And yes, since the mining companies are from Canada, a large portion of the management personnel are Canadians. The same happens when an American company operates in Canada.

That said, unlike the fishing and tourism industries, mining and oil operations take place year round, and that's why Alaska benefits so much from both. But in regards to the Pebble mine, it's up to the AK officials involved in the process to achieve deals that benefit Alaska, although this can only be done to a point where the mining operation can take place with a profit.
There are no property taxes in that part of Alaska.
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Old 06-30-2013, 12:59 AM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tidelines View Post
How many U.S. companies are involved in natural resource development in Canada? How many U.S. workers are employed in Canada compared to Canadians working in the U.S.?
Good questions, but most corporations operate globally now. For example, I mentioned US lumber companies operating in Canada. In this case most of the workers are Canadian, and most of management is American. In the Canadian gold companies around Fairbanks, most management is Canadian, and most workers Americans.
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Old 06-30-2013, 01:04 AM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bortstc37 View Post
There are no property taxes in that part of Alaska.
Property taxes are paid in all boroughs throughout Alaska. For example, the local gold mines near Fairbanks pay property taxes to the North Star Borough. Over at the borough's website there is a page that deals with property assessments. If you go to that page and enter the name of the gold company operating in the borough, it will show you how much property tax the company is paying every year. Also, you can see how much property taxes all corporations are paying locally, as well as your neighbors if you know their lot numbers (or addresses and names). Even the local airports pay property and other taxes. Other taxes include business licenses, and so forth.

If the mine is not within a borough, then the State will receive revenue from it. But if the mine is within a borough or city limit, both plus the State will receive revenue. The property tax depends on the yearly assessed value of the property.
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