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Old 03-10-2013, 01:32 AM
 
Location: Anchorage
1,926 posts, read 3,912,483 times
Reputation: 862

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I'm retired in TN (near Knoxville) and saw your post. I moved here 6 years ago from Maryland and was previously living in Long Island, NY. While we do have 4 seasons, summer is longer than others. Right now it is March and we have temps in the 60s and the daffodils are in bloom. Tomorrow they are predicting 67 degrees for March 10. It is hot in May and is hot through mid-October. Even if it gets cool at night, daytime temps in early October and May can be in the 80s. September is just as hot as July and August. It is humid. I tend to be more active outdoors in the non-summer months. Winter, on the other hand, is very mild. I have not worn more than a zippered hoodie over a long sleeved shirt, this winter or last winter. When we get snow, you can typically still see some grass. If it snows overnight, it's all gone by noon the next day. I think I have worn gloves twice in 6 years. I have never taken the snow shovel out of my car trunk in 6 years.

There are a lot of grey sky days in the winter. In the summer we get a lot of thunderstorms between 4PM and 6PM. Our state is very green. Last year by April 3, we were totally green. Before that Bradford Pears and Red Buds (end of March) are in bloom.

We also get tornado warnings and tornadoes. When you look for a place to live, you might want to look for a home with a basement.
Thank you for your kind words.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EVAunit1981 View Post
TN does have a lot of heat and humidity in July and August. It doesn't snow much here and when it does, it rarely sticks. It usually melts when it hits the ground. If it snows more than two inches people will be talking about "that big snow" for a while.

Think about it this way: is the weather ever so bad that you just don't want to do anything? In TN it's our summers, not winters, that are that way. Even then, there are plenty of things to do outside without it being horrible.

We only have about 6 weeks or so when it's really hot. But the previous poster is right, from May through October it's warm.

What part of TN were you looking at? TN has 3 distinct regions, west, middle and east.
Well, so far we've looked at the West and Eastern parts, all in the Northern Half of the state. Some really great small towns there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
I wish you my best on your moving to Tennessee.

One of the problems of living in Alaska is that the cost of living is very high, so unless one makes a ton of money it's quite difficult to move ahead financially. Other than that, the weather is not a problem to most of us. My wife and I have been in Alaska for a long time, and are planning to retire somewhere around Northern Washington. It's humid over there, but we like the snow and the cool temperatures. The cost of living is quite low compared to Fairbanks, although taxes are high. But even with three retirement pensions (am working on my second, plus my wife's) we could not retire here.
YES YES YES! We loved the Fairbanks summers and agreed they more them make up for the winter but we are just not ready to move back up there. Really looking to live in a place where the winter wont kill you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dakster View Post
Good luck with your move. I am sure you will figure it all out and be happy. Tennessee has such a varied terrain/climate. Since you say you will farm, I can only assume you mean to move to a very rural area. Which is the only area I would consider as well. I have been there many times and at different times of the year. Summers are usually not as brutal as other parts if the country, but I imagine it will be an adjustment from AK.

Btw, in Tennessee and other surrounding states you get to actually drive and live in the mountains if you want to.
I love the idea that TN is so close to everything! And yes, very rural is my cup of tea. I'm way more of a country gal then a city gal. Thank you for your kind words.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gobrien View Post
I haven't lived in Tennessee but did live for 14 years in Arkansas. Places like this have a lot to offer, and seem to have a real homespun sense of family and community and old-fashioned decency. I miss the daffodils and redbud trees in the spring and the country goodness. The climate where I lived has changed a lot though-from a green lushness to drought and heat spikes. Make sure if you plan to farm that there is adequate water supply. You can get used to the temperature extremes in the summer, I did and you know where I'm from..I went from the Interior to a Southern apartment without air conditioning. Was miserable at first. Make sure you have air conditioning, but over-reliance on it makes it harder to adapt.
Thanks! And the highlighted quote is what we are looking for as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 124c41 View Post
My wife and I were born and raised in Texas, and that is hot. We moved to Middle Tennessee in Oct. 2012, after having come here in July of that year to scout things out. Even in July, here it felt like a spring day where we were from, so weather isn't an issue for us. I would imagine you might have some adjustment to the climate, coming from Alaska, but as far as the people, cost of living, and the general atmosphere here, you can't beat it. There is a whole lot of rural area here, and I would bet you could find something to fit your bill. Like the other posters have said, the summer is really nice here, very green. We are excited about seeing spring here, since we have only seen summer and winter. Which, by the way, having lived in Utah for a short span, and seeing a lot of snow, the winter this year has been more what I call a " Norman Rockwell" sort of winter, with just enough snow to accent the landscape. I would say to do like us, and lots of other folks on CD have said to do. Follow your heart,, and keep an open mind, and who knows, you might like Tennessee as much as we do. Good Luck!
Thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by FCStraight View Post
No worries! You're doing the right thing. We live in northwest WA...and we're tired of the constant overcast and rain. We can't even get decent snow in these parts. If you pick a home with lots of big trees around (plenty of those in TN...well, at least in Knoxville where I am most familiar with...have kinfolks there)..the shade will help keep the heat tolerable. You'll love the winters there. It will be like summer in Anchorage.
And cost of living is pretty low compared to anywhere else I've been. If you can, make a trip there first..but if not possible...just move on there...just make sure you've got everything set up on that end. We're getting ready to move out of the Northwest ourselves...to where there is plenty of sunshine...even in the winter. Good luck to you and family.
Thank you. That's pretty much how we ended up spending so much time here in Alaska. We just moved here.
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Old 03-10-2013, 01:51 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
555 posts, read 1,052,319 times
Reputation: 650
Just curious, what towns have you been looking at? I've lived in West TN all my life, so if there's anything you want to know about it, just ask! I'm no expert on Middle or East TN but I do know that the ground is much more rocky there. Not that that should stop you from having a garden though.
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Old 03-10-2013, 04:01 AM
 
Location: SoCal & Mid-TN
2,083 posts, read 2,013,189 times
Reputation: 2372
I'm from Nashville and moved to Los Angeles 19 years ago. My only time in Alaska was a week long cruise but it was lovely. Personally, I couldn't deal with the very short winter days you have up there (I have depression issues that winter/dark is hard for me). I live in TN for all of 2012, the first time in 18 years. The winter wasn't so bad mostly because I worked from home and didn't have to get out and scrape the windshield each morning. But summer with it's high humidity was hard after the drier climate of Southern California. TN is lovely and has a lot of history - and I'm a history buff so I enjoy that. There are 4 full seasons - spring and fall were so lovely after SoCal. But it's a big change for you. As long as you are flexible, adaptable, and have done some research on what to expect, you should be fine.
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Old 03-10-2013, 12:39 PM
 
Location: 112 Ocean Avenue
5,706 posts, read 7,900,433 times
Reputation: 8878
As I've mentioned before, my Dad was a lifer in the Coast Guard so we moved every 3 years or so. The worst place by far was FL. The heat, humidity, bugs, storms and all were just awful. I've been to TN but never lived there so I don't know how its climate compares with that of northern (Atlantic Beach) FL. I do know its hot and humid there.

When the dew point gets above 70 it feels like you're sitting in a sauna right smack-dab in the pits of hell. You don't get used to it -- ever.

It's a pretty state and if you do move there I hope its what you're looking for.
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Old 03-10-2013, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Interior alaska
6,381 posts, read 11,956,071 times
Reputation: 3470
Well I wish you the best in your new lifestyle, but one thing you may not really think about until you have moved, is that you will miss the State when you are gone for a while, at least most people do that I know that have left. Many have moved back when the grass wasn't as green as they thought it was going to be.

Keep us updated on your new life!

Good luck!
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Old 03-10-2013, 06:59 PM
 
Location: The Woods
16,458 posts, read 21,495,098 times
Reputation: 8417
You should visit during the hot part of the summer to see if you can handle that before spending the money to move. Last August I was in the Midwest and driving through even Ohio I found the humidity and heat to be unbearable (it was over 90 degrees and over 90 percent humidity). TN will be hotter than OH. Of course, I sometimes find even Vermont summers unbearably hot for a week or two a year, so it really comes down to what you're best adapted to, hot or cold. Also be aware of the drought problems the South is experiencing, and in TN, be aware of how the TVA can impact you.
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Old 03-10-2013, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Anchorage, AK
48 posts, read 65,015 times
Reputation: 37
How wonderful for you! You'll only know if it is for you if you try. Tennessee is so gorgeous - the humidity keeps me away. Enjoy the adventure with open arms & minds!
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Old 03-11-2013, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Des Moines Metro
4,984 posts, read 5,471,946 times
Reputation: 9217
I know several families who've moved to Ohio from AK and N. MN for the longer growing season. They thought they were going to die their first summer here, but the second one wasn't as bad, and by the third one, they were doing a lot better.

Granted, August is generally our worst month and it's cooler here in Central Ohio than TN because of the Great Lakes, but I thought I'd share that.

Good luck with your move!
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Old 03-16-2013, 08:46 AM
 
370 posts, read 746,502 times
Reputation: 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadfamily6now View Post
We've grown tired of Anchorage, and the weather here is dismal. We've been in Alaska for about 16 years. Lived in Delta, Fairbanks, North Pole and Anchorage....

I don't need any advice really, just had to tell someone who might understand and I'm not sure those in the TN forum would get it.

Hi,
Are you saying that you are sad to leave? I understand that you want to farm and that you've lived in the places you mentioned above. Sounds like your heading, (or headed already) south.

Good luck, best to you and hopefully you will enjoy a nice good long visit in the Kenai before you go.

Jen
p.s. unless you've already done 'all that.'
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Old 03-16-2013, 09:04 AM
 
287 posts, read 484,228 times
Reputation: 171
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I'm retired in TN (near Knoxville) and saw your post. I moved here 6 years ago from Maryland and was previously living in Long Island, NY. While we do have 4 seasons, summer is longer than others. Right now it is March and we have temps in the 60s and the daffodils are in bloom. Tomorrow they are predicting 67 degrees for March 10. It is hot in May and is hot through mid-October. Even if it gets cool at night, daytime temps in early October and May can be in the 80s. September is just as hot as July and August. It is humid. I tend to be more active outdoors in the non-summer months. Winter, on the other hand, is very mild. I have not worn more than a zippered hoodie over a long sleeved shirt, this winter or last winter. When we get snow, you can typically still see some grass. If it snows overnight, it's all gone by noon the next day. I think I have worn gloves twice in 6 years. I have never taken the snow shovel out of my car trunk in 6 years.

There are a lot of grey sky days in the winter. In the summer we get a lot of thunderstorms between 4PM and 6PM. Our state is very green. Last year by April 3, we were totally green. Before that Bradford Pears and Red Buds (end of March) are in bloom.

We also get tornado warnings and tornadoes. When you look for a place to live, you might want to look for a home with a basement.
pffft - predicting 86 for today and 95 for Monday... our winter was about a week long... now comes the heat again. Summer lows are in ~80 degree range, so even at night it sucks.

It's the biggest reason I want to leave - no real seasons.
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