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Old 06-01-2015, 08:42 PM
 
1,509 posts, read 1,315,403 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stiffnecked View Post
the op posted this 8 years ago. Sadly he was eatin' by cannibals in 2012.....
:d
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Old 06-02-2015, 08:41 AM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,307 posts, read 11,085,249 times
Reputation: 7998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaskalover 777 View Post
You poor guy it's so hard when ya just want answer and you can't get it. People become directed in a manner they can't see sometimes I think you were thinking what if I moved to Alaska was able to live remotely with a family like wife or husband and you could kill and smoke the meat but what about everything else. Well to say for sure it would be difficult to survive I would do research on the true Eskimo or villages still there they survived really survived life for centuries how how did their body live without lots of veggies what did they eat besides fish find out I'd loved to know myself this was written along time ago I hope you still come to your yest ion at some point I'd like to know if you ever did move )
Thanks ...... I don't know what a "yest ion" is, but I never did move - thank god.

Reading back over the thread, I'm struck by what flaming, USDA Prime rectums most of the posters were, especially warptman, unable to answer the original question even in the simplest manner. Then I noticed the dates ..... apparently I'd asked when summer was long gone, when the long days were turning into long nights, when people were starting to hunker down or shop in anticipation of the long holiday season ..... in short, when Alaskans were becoming depressed and grumpy due to SAD.

I suppose I should have waited to ask around this time of the year.
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Old 06-02-2015, 10:15 AM
 
1,532 posts, read 880,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woof View Post
Thanks ...... I don't know what a "yest ion" is, but I never did move - thank god.

Reading back over the thread, I'm struck by what flaming, USDA Prime rectums most of the posters were, especially warptman, unable to answer the original question even in the simplest manner. Then I noticed the dates ..... apparently I'd asked when summer was long gone, when the long days were turning into long nights, when people were starting to hunker down or shop in anticipation of the long holiday season ..... in short, when Alaskans were becoming depressed and grumpy due to SAD.

I suppose I should have waited to ask around this time of the year.
To answer the question. We eat same food as most Americans. Only thing we eat that you can't buy is moose. Haven't bought beef in over two years. Most veggies are frozen, though we do order fresh from a grocery store in anchorage.

Most (60-75%) of my family's protein comes from subsistence activities. Moose is main source. Then chicken. Then salmon. Then other (beaver, other fish, Lynx, pork,etc). Moose is eaten 4 days a week. Chicken 2 times and the other day is other sources.
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Old 06-02-2015, 12:57 PM
 
19,000 posts, read 24,521,189 times
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I think sometimes people get defensive because there are those who act as if Alaskans are some sort of curiosity. I recall a tourist rushing up to me out of the blue once and demanding to know if I grew my own food. She was insistent and...bizarre, and all I was doing was sitting on a bench. Another one accosted me as I was sitting on another bench and asked how they "closed down the town" when tourist season was over. I replied that it was a real town with real schools, businesses, churches, people, and that it didn't cease to exist just because the tour buses stopped running.

That's one thing I don't miss. The tourists acting like everything was for them and that the people who lived there were curiosities with uncivilized lifestyles.


ETA that the OP really didn't come across as having the attitude mentioned above.

Warpt isn't an ass; he's a really nice guy, and he did answer a lot of the questions here.

As far as the southern part of the state, not much moose down there. Wild game includes venison and waterfowl. You can't buy the quality of seafood that's regularly served on southeast Alaskan tables in a grocery store on a regular basis. Lots of berries. What people eat depends on personal tastes and preferences, mostly.

If supply lines were somehow cut, most of the people in Alaska would starve. The interior Natives couldn't make it without being nomadic, remember. Those in SE would do all right until the fish ran out. There's just too many people there now.

There's a lot of information available online about traditional diets that can answer questions about how people survived without "veggies."

Last edited by Metlakatla; 06-02-2015 at 01:46 PM..
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Old 06-02-2015, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
2,433 posts, read 3,553,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
That's one thing I don't miss. The tourists acting like everything was for them, like the whole place was for them and that the people who lived there were curiosities with uncivilized lifestyles.
I've got a friend that lives in Hoonah, which is now a cruise ship stop. He came out of his door one day to find a tourist on his porch taking pictures of his flower pots...
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Old 06-02-2015, 01:51 PM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,307 posts, read 11,085,249 times
Reputation: 7998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haolejohn View Post
To answer the question. We eat same food as most Americans. Only thing we eat that you can't buy is moose. Haven't bought beef in over two years. Most veggies are frozen, though we do order fresh from a grocery store in anchorage.

Most (60-75%) of my family's protein comes from subsistence activities. Moose is main source. Then chicken. Then salmon. Then other (beaver, other fish, Lynx, pork,etc). Moose is eaten 4 days a week. Chicken 2 times and the other day is other sources.
OK, so it sounds like in a collapse of civilization type of scenario, survivors would be living almost entirely on meat or fish. Thanks.
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Old 06-02-2015, 04:59 PM
 
1,532 posts, read 880,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woof View Post
OK, so it sounds like in a collapse of civilization type of scenario, survivors would be living almost entirely on meat or fish. Thanks.
There are berries and some areas a garden could be grown. I actually live in a region that has very fertile soil in the village. The problem though is that in a collapse a garden would force you to be stationary. Luckily moose are plentiful where I live and Bison were just introduced to the area.

What would make surviving hard would be the lack of gas. Hard to access the game without a boat.
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Old 01-25-2017, 02:25 PM
 
820 posts, read 344,228 times
Reputation: 926
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcticthaw View Post
When the price of oil gets that high, you all will be out of water and we will start selling that to you!

We enjoy that people from other states think Alaska is remote and isolated. Dependent on shipping and trucking. What they forget is we are also an aircraft state. Have our own oil wells and instate refining capacity. So if push comes to shove, we turn the pipeline to our refineries and supply our needs first. What is left over we sell to the highest bidder. Simple Economics. Aircraft from all parts of the world stop here for two reasons. We are in direct path for most air routes to the major cities and ports. We provide fuel at competative rates. Also just a bit of trivia, if the Shuttle ever had a higher lattitued orbit we are an alternate landing site for them. Most the major runways are designed for heavy transports. The odds of all three methods of freight delivery being down over a long period of time is negligable.

The traditional life style you mention is only a generation or two ago. Look around your community and ask if outside food sources were stopped tomorrow. How long would you last, and what skills and more important what seeds do you have stocked up for the next garden.

My point is everyone is in the same boat. We are just a bit more visible to others.
Look niw farther than how quickly things became desparate in New Orleans after Katrina.
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