U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Alaska
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-08-2013, 04:05 PM
 
599 posts, read 807,420 times
Reputation: 579

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by richelles View Post
Reading the material posted here reinforces my belief that few people fully understand the concepts of nuclear reactions. One thing is that creating a nuclear reaction isn't easy. Look at the years it took to actually become nuclear proficient. The thing most people think they know about nuclear reactions is summarized by the term "Nuclear Meltdown". The first thing we need to understand is during a nuclear meltdown the amount of nuclear fuel involved is directly related to the seriousness of the incident. A nuclear criticality excursion can be caused by a number of different things. Loss of coolant is the most obvious cause which could be from a number of causes such as low flow or loss of coolant pressure. Damage to the nuclear fuel could range from a local meltdown of a fuel rod to meltdown of an entire fuel assembly. The latter is close to what the so called "China Syndrome" was purported to be where the liquid core melts through the reactor vessel and into the Earth until it reaches the water table. If a criticality excursion occurs there are a number of safeguards known as "Emergency Core Cooling Systems" (ECCS) built into reactors ranging from lowering the control rods by gravity, flooding the area with neutron absorbing material, or dilution by debris bed formation created by melting the components in the reactor vessel until the inability of the chain reaction to continue is reached. This goes back to the first statement above where even getting to a critical mass is difficult. In the Fukushima incident there is a possibility the nuclear fuel has melted through the base of the reactor vessel and the resulting hydrogen explosion has allowed the radioactive products to escape into the environment. But the more exposure to materials that can create a debris bed the greater the dilution that is occurring rendering the continuation of a chain reaction impossible. So at this point the danger of a continued chain reaction is remote and the function of nuclear decay is rapidly removing the radiation danger. Two important factors in dealing with radiation are time and distance. The half life of the nuclear isotopes is removing the radiation and how far away you are from the source is directly related to the exposure. So if you're a long way from the source and it has taken time for the material to reach you the possibility of contamination is getting smaller. So even Chicken Little should relax now and hope they get the mess cleaned up in due course.

Another internet scholar on the job.

" In the Fukushima incident there is a possibility the nuclear fuel has melted through the base of the reactor vessel " - Umm, there is NO QUESTION at this point. The fuel HAS escaped containment.


"....and the function of nuclear decay is rapidly removing the radiation danger. " - LMAO. Please repost with the half-life of the materials involved. "Rapidly" in terms of geologic time, tens of thousands of years as we measure it.


Please go back to your knitting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-08-2013, 05:45 PM
 
457 posts, read 875,712 times
Reputation: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rance View Post
We can run...but we can't hide.
Wahts that supposed to mean Rance?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2013, 04:04 AM
 
Location: Interior alaska
6,381 posts, read 11,984,424 times
Reputation: 3470
Quote:
Originally Posted by coloradoalimony View Post
Another internet scholar on the job.

" In the Fukushima incident there is a possibility the nuclear fuel has melted through the base of the reactor vessel " - Umm, there is NO QUESTION at this point. The fuel HAS escaped containment.


"....and the function of nuclear decay is rapidly removing the radiation danger. " - LMAO. Please repost with the half-life of the materials involved. "Rapidly" in terms of geologic time, tens of thousands of years as we measure it.


Please go back to your knitting.
Accually, he is Liberal, but a very sharp one (biting my tounge) and I am pretty sure he has a lot more crediblity about this subject that almost anyone else here. The "Sky is falling" crowd is just flapping their hands and arms in the air to scare people and try to sound important.

If you accually read his posts, you would realize that what he is saying is pretty accurate (assuming you know anything yourself).

Is the reactor going to be a mess, I am sure it is, will life end as we know it... Pretty doubtful.

The Russians dumped hot reactors into the Arctic Ocean for decades and yet nobody there claimed anything, mostly because they would be sent to a "Camp" somewhere. But regardless, we haven't seen massive spikes in radiation, where by the "Doomsdayers", we should be seeing Godzilla showing up at any time now...

In the Ocean there is salt, which is Calcium... Look up what that does to Radiation when mixed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-09-2013, 09:33 PM
 
941 posts, read 1,474,875 times
Reputation: 767
Quote:
Originally Posted by coloradoalimony View Post
Another internet scholar on the job.
" In the Fukushima incident there is a possibility the nuclear fuel has melted through the base of the reactor vessel " - Umm, there is NO QUESTION at this point. The fuel HAS escaped containment.
"....and the function of nuclear decay is rapidly removing the radiation danger. " - LMAO. Please repost with the half-life of the materials involved. "Rapidly" in terms of geologic time, tens of thousands of years as we measure it.
Please go back to your knitting.
Answering someone who is so far out of their natural sphere of knowledge is frowned upon by intelligent people but I'll address your attempt at an insult.

Am I to assume you know how to knit? If you don't know more about knitting than you know about this subject then is there anything you are a master of?

Would you please tell us the authority that has entered the destroyed containment structure and verified that the fuel has indeed melted the thick steel bottom of the reactor vessel so the melted fuel has impacted the concrete pad that supports the multi ton reactor vessel? And while on the subject of reactor vessels when did you examine a GE Boiling Water Reactor and would you describe the model and year of construction and the details and principal features of that reactor? Would you identify the differences between the three types of reactors that have been involved in the three major nuclear incidents? TMI was the first and it was a PWR (pressurized Water Reactor), Chernobyl was a Graphite Moderated Reactor, and Fukushima was a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor. Each was a totally different scenario and the results are due to the type of reactor it was. The safety features of each are different so you should be able to describe them in detail. Then try to give us the exact causal factor by either the operators or failure of safety features that caused each incident.

Then would you be able to identify what you think the resulting steam and Hydrogen explosions at Fukushima have in any manner affected the integrity of the reactor lid, the reactor vessel itself, the downcomers and the associated piping to and from the turbine? Is there another possibility that might account for the leakage of the coolant water and for the presence of that water outside the closed system? And while we're on the subject of accident analysis and failure investigation would you comment on when the SCRAM Event occurred and what effect would the damage afflicted on the containment structure have had on the fuel rods stored in the fuel pool? And were any of the reactors live after the earthquake event? Describe using your enormous amount of knowledge about nuclear fission why the containment structure at Fukushima didn't burn as did the reactor at Chernobyl. Anyone who can tell as you can about the damage inside the radiation zone that no one can enter at this time should be paid millions of dollars a day by TEPCO because such an amazing person could save them those sums of money.

And FYI I wouldn't post to the List the approximately 270 entries of known isotopes that have half lives of more than 1 hour but not more than 1 day. There are 3 naturally occurring isotopes that have half lives between 56 seconds to 22 minutes. I don't now how many such isotopes have been created by human activity but my thoughts range to some wild figures. I also don't think I've seen anything about the isotopes that are being released at Fukushima now but it is also probably higher than we know.

Also I'm sure you are capable of LYAO but I'd be willing to make a small wager the countenance you're displaying to the World includes that exact image. As I said before "when you find your self in a hole stop digging."

Last edited by richelles; 11-09-2013 at 09:43 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-10-2013, 05:01 AM
 
Location: on the road to new job
324 posts, read 567,033 times
Reputation: 183
Fukushima Special - Shows - Coast to Coast AM
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2013, 10:42 AM
 
Location: on the road to new job
324 posts, read 567,033 times
Reputation: 183
Cesium, Thorium and Uranium do not have miniscule half lives.

The immediate area of the powerplant has a 20km exclusion zone - where no one can live, fish or farm. Residents are allowed to return for a few hours every couple of months - even then they risk their lives to honor their families graves.

"The most commonly-used isotopes -- those found at Fukushima -- are plutonium 238, with a half life of 88 years; plutonium 239, with a half life of 24,000 years; and plutonium 240, with a half life of 6,500 years."

Fukushima: what is plutonium and what are the dangers?
[LEFT]
[/LEFT]
Ecological half-lives of radiocesium in ... [Environ Sci Technol. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

To put this in greater perspective - I worked within 10 miles of eight nuc stations, all of which are older than anything in Japan. Every couple of months there'd be a steam release - that the general public would read about a few weeks after the event. Today, they notify immediately.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-11-2013, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Naptowne, Alaska
15,596 posts, read 34,641,725 times
Reputation: 14657
Either way...I'm staying put.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2013, 07:06 AM
 
Location: on the road to new job
324 posts, read 567,033 times
Reputation: 183
RSOE EDIS - Nuclear Event in USA on Monday, 11 November, 2013 at 19:44 (07:44 PM) UTC. EDIS CODE: NC-20131111-41602-USA

To summarize: "Duke Energy officials said today they shut down Unit 1 at the Oconee nuclear power plant after a small radioactive leak was detected. The leak, confined to the plant's airtight, reinforced containment building, posed no danger to the public, said Duke spokesperson B.J. Gatten. The leak was part of the system that circulates water through the reactor, Gatten said. "The leak itself was less than one-tenth of a gallon per minute," Gatten said. "There's been no threat to the public or employees." "Plans are in place to begin further analysis and repair the unit," Gatten said. It will take several days of analysis to complete "our detailed repair plan," she said. Oconee's Unit 2 has been offline for scheduled refueling while Unit 3 is operating at 100 percent power, Gatten said. A Nuclear Regulatory Commission report showed Unit 1 was operating at 100 percent power Friday. "We don't anticipate any problems meeting our customers' needs," Gatten said."

My Grandchildren live a short distance away. I am making plans for them to move to a safer location. This should scare the crap outta the area "preppers".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2013, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Interior alaska
6,381 posts, read 11,984,424 times
Reputation: 3470
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawknest View Post
RSOE EDIS - Nuclear Event in USA on Monday, 11 November, 2013 at 19:44 (07:44 PM) UTC. EDIS CODE: NC-20131111-41602-USA

To summarize: "Duke Energy officials said today they shut down Unit 1 at the Oconee nuclear power plant after a small radioactive leak was detected. The leak, confined to the plant's airtight, reinforced containment building, posed no danger to the public, said Duke spokesperson B.J. Gatten. The leak was part of the system that circulates water through the reactor, Gatten said. "The leak itself was less than one-tenth of a gallon per minute," Gatten said. "There's been no threat to the public or employees." "Plans are in place to begin further analysis and repair the unit," Gatten said. It will take several days of analysis to complete "our detailed repair plan," she said. Oconee's Unit 2 has been offline for scheduled refueling while Unit 3 is operating at 100 percent power, Gatten said. A Nuclear Regulatory Commission report showed Unit 1 was operating at 100 percent power Friday. "We don't anticipate any problems meeting our customers' needs," Gatten said."

My Grandchildren live a short distance away. I am making plans for them to move to a safer location. This should scare the crap outta the area "preppers".
What if your Grandchildren don't want to move to a "Safer" location. Is there one?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-12-2013, 08:17 AM
 
Location: Naptowne, Alaska
15,596 posts, read 34,641,725 times
Reputation: 14657
Alaska maybe?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Alaska
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top