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Old 02-08-2014, 01:05 AM
 
Location: Interior alaska
6,381 posts, read 11,962,145 times
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I have been driving winter roads in Alaska for upward of some 40+ years and have been stuck once requiring a tow, and that was in my dad's driveway. Ran a wrecker for a number of years in interior Alaska and pulled out hundreds (if not more) of people that simple drive too fast.

4WD x 0=0 as does 2WD x 0=0 The only advantage to 4WD is you can get farther out into the "Pucker Brush"*....

*Pucker Brush: What your A$$hole does on the seat when headed off the road at a high rate of speed and the brush approaches before the larger trees make contact.
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Old 02-10-2014, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,178 posts, read 27,504,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starlite9 View Post
I have been driving winter roads in Alaska for upward of some 40+ years and have been stuck once requiring a tow, and that was in my dad's driveway. Ran a wrecker for a number of years in interior Alaska and pulled out hundreds (if not more) of people that simple drive too fast.

4WD x 0=0 as does 2WD x 0=0 The only advantage to 4WD is you can get farther out into the "Pucker Brush"*....

*Pucker Brush: What your A$$hole does on the seat when headed off the road at a high rate of speed and the brush approaches before the larger trees make contact.
Yes, a lot of driving into the ditch during the winter is because of people driving too fast for conditions, but a lot of others are cause by the lack of driving experience on ice, and the lack of proper tires. This happens to a lot of newcomers to Alaska, including military members. During the winter, regardless of what the road sign says and how slow one drives, if one drives into the ditch and a trooper comes by, more than likely one will get a ticket fro driving to fast for conditions

During the summer one can get a traffic ticket if driving under 45MPH, on less one has a reason for doing so, although this sort of ticket usually relates to interfering with the flow of traffic.

Now, when I arrived here back on the early 70's, I already knew how to drive on ice. Back then I was stationed in Northern NY, and used to drive my car on Lake Champlain during the winter. In those years sleet (frozen rain) was very common around Plattsburgh, NY too. I was ordered to Elmendorf the first time, and then ended at Eielson AFB, and retired in '94 after 20 years in the military.
---------

That said, there is a big advantage on the sleekest conditions with AWD plus traction/stability control vehicles. Such are quite surefooted on ice, but it does not mean that one should drive faster just because the vehicle provides added traction. On the same token, if there only is one open lane left and the road is dry (no ice or snow on it), I do at least the speed limit, since driving too slow can also create accidents or at least interfere with the flow of traffic.

Last edited by RayinAK; 02-10-2014 at 09:40 PM..
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Old 02-15-2014, 02:07 PM
 
1 posts, read 890 times
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This is my first winter in Anchorage. My Nissan Titan arrived from California just over a week ago. The all season tires I have on them are somewhat bald. I'm overly cautious when driving. I had my first breakdown when coming from a stop, with very slow acceleration, I felt the truck sliding. I was on 2WD then, I switched it to 4WD and still couldn't get a grip. I learned later on that I needed to maybe let the tire stop spinning first, rest, so it can actually engage to 4WD. I'm still not sure about that theory. Yes, I got a flipped off but no honks. I actually burst out crying because my husband started laughing at my moment of panic. Winter driving, so far, is what I hate most about living here. Obviously, it's because I don't feel confident about it.

I know I need to change my tires. Should I buy winter tires now? Is it too late in the season? I'm having a hard time finding shops that still carries winter tires, most takes 4 weeks to get them in. Or should I just replace my all season tires?

Thanks!
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Old 02-15-2014, 03:58 PM
 
4,718 posts, read 8,708,394 times
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Most vehicles won't engage 4WD if you are in wheelspin. Tires all have to be going the same speed for the splines to match up and the computer to allow a shift into 4WD. You wouldn't like the result if it did engage 4WD during wheelspin. Your Nissan should engage 4WD if you are going local street speeds as long as all tires are going the same rate of speed. You should never do this on dry pavement. FYI, For 4-LO you need to be stopped and in neutral - and sometimes you need to put the truck in drive or reverse and move a little and then go back into neutral for it to shift.

I can't answer your 'should you get snow tires question'- My only advice is that you should get rid of those bald tires as soon as possible. I look at this way, new all seasons will be better and safer than bald all seasons. And you will be driving legal, assuming they are that bald.
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Old 02-15-2014, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
2,561 posts, read 3,942,452 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowed View Post
I was on 2WD then, I switched it to 4WD and still couldn't get a grip. I learned later on that I needed to maybe let the tire stop spinning first, rest, so it can actually engage to 4WD. I'm still not sure about that theory.
Just to let you know.... Four wheel drive will NOT help you stop any faster. It does help when getting started, but does nothing for stopping.
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Old 02-15-2014, 04:02 PM
 
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Duplicate Post.
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Old 02-16-2014, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Inland Empire, WA
2,133 posts, read 1,694,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dakster View Post
Most vehicles won't engage 4WD if you are in wheelspin. Tires all have to be going the same speed for the splines to match up and the computer to allow a shift into 4WD. You wouldn't like the result if it did engage 4WD during wheelspin. Your Nissan should engage 4WD if you are going local street speeds as long as all tires are going the same rate of speed. You should never do this on dry pavement. FYI, For 4-LO you need to be stopped and in neutral - and sometimes you need to put the truck in drive or reverse and move a little and then go back into neutral for it to shift.

I can't answer your 'should you get snow tires question'- My only advice is that you should get rid of those bald tires as soon as possible. I look at this way, new all seasons will be better and safer than bald all seasons. And you will be driving legal, assuming they are that bald.

That is correct!
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Old 02-18-2014, 06:37 PM
 
4,718 posts, read 8,708,394 times
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Almost forgot since I don't drive in ice/snow that much. To aid in traction weight over the rear axle or in the back of bed (by the tailgate) helps. Low tech ways like sandbags and firewood work. High tech ways like rubber bladders that you fill with water designed to withstand freezing and are the shape of your bed are also available.
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Old 02-19-2014, 01:31 AM
 
Location: Valdez, Alaska
2,762 posts, read 4,205,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dakster View Post
Almost forgot since I don't drive in ice/snow that much. To aid in traction weight over the rear axle or in the back of bed (by the tailgate) helps. Low tech ways like sandbags and firewood work. High tech ways like rubber bladders that you fill with water designed to withstand freezing and are the shape of your bed are also available.
Or just don't shovel the snow out of the bed of your truck.
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Old 02-19-2014, 07:03 AM
 
4,718 posts, read 8,708,394 times
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As long as it weighed enough that could work. However, I keep my bed covered - so I would have to go out of my way to do that. Plus, I actually like to USE my bed at times.
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