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Old 03-18-2014, 07:28 PM
 
Location: In the middle of nowhere
341 posts, read 353,084 times
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If you have the money, seeing parts of Alaska are relatively easy. Where I live, everyone knows each other and we have internet access, cell phones and tend to be somewhat accommodating to visitors if we know they are just tourists that want to see things. Our roads are all dirt and gravel, but some people have cars and 4-wheelers tend to go a lot of places too. It is expensive to get here and food is much more expensive too, but you find out that you can live with a lot less also.
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Old 03-18-2014, 07:36 PM
 
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Thank you for all the advise. I am not physically disabled, I have been diagnosed with PTSD and adjustment disorder. This is one of the reasons I want to get off grid, simple life. So of I bought a place off grid (not like middle of nowhere) and burnt my own wood, hunted and fished I could not do it on a grand a month??
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Old 03-18-2014, 07:47 PM
 
20,417 posts, read 26,539,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oifoefvet View Post
Thank you for all the advise. I am not physically disabled, I have been diagnosed with PTSD and adjustment disorder. This is one of the reasons I want to get off grid, simple life. So of I bought a place off grid (not like middle of nowhere) and burnt my own wood, hunted and fished I could not do it on a grand a month??
Why not? If you own the land free-and-clear, I don't see that much of a problem. I'd stay in the Southeast -- wood, fish, and game are all plentiful there. You'd have to supplement your diet with staples, but they can be purchased in bulk. You can get permits to chop wood on some of the public land. I'm not sure how long it takes to be eligible for subsistence fishing -- that varies by district and by year. You can get permits for chopping wood on certain public lands.

I wouldn't try this in the interior, but there's no reason you can't get along all right on that income in other parts of the state as long as you aren't making house/land payments or paying huge utility bills.

Last edited by Metlakatla; 03-18-2014 at 07:56 PM..
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Old 03-18-2014, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Texas
38 posts, read 75,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
Why not? If you own the land free-and-clear, I don't see that much of a problem. I'd stay in the Southeast -- wood, fish, and game are all plentiful there. You'd have to supplement your diet with staples, but they can be purchased in bulk. You can get permits to chop wood on some of the public land. I'm not sure how long it takes to be eligible for subsistence fishing - that varies by district and by year.
Sorry to butt in here, but how hard would it be to get meds flown in? From what I've seen, bush pilots can land almost anywhere.
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Old 03-18-2014, 08:02 PM
 
20,417 posts, read 26,539,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hippyman View Post
Sorry to butt in here, but how hard would it be to get meds flown in? From what I've seen, bush pilots can land almost anywhere.
Well, they can, but they often don't anymore. It would be better to find a place close enough to a mail drop. You don't have to go completely remote to live a pretty isolated life in Alaska. The OP, for instance, for some reason I'm thinking Whale Pass would be a good place for him. There's a little post office/store, and a few other self sufficient types there.
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Old 03-18-2014, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Texas
38 posts, read 75,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
Well, they can, but they often don't anymore. It would be better to find a place close enough to a mail drop. You don't have to go completely remote to live a pretty isolated life in Alaska. The OP, for instance, for some reason I'm thinking Whale Pass would be a good place for him. There's a little post office/store, and a few other self sufficient types there.
Here's the thing, I'm kind of in the same spot as the OP. I'm not physically disabled, per se, but I do have to take daily meds to keep my stress levels under control. And the more I'm around civilization, the more I notice it stressing me out. I just about got laughed off another board for questions like this, so bear with me, but what do you mean by "they often don't anymore?" I know I want to get away from the tourist areas, if possible, and build an Earthship type dwelling.
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Old 03-18-2014, 08:29 PM
 
20,417 posts, read 26,539,344 times
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There are places without property tax; I think that Whale Pass is one of them.

For food -- this is after you get set up, as someone said earlier, getting started can be expensive, but after that, not so much.

Forget everything you know about -48 grocery shopping. Before I go on, though, I need to make it clear that I'm talking about remote/rural areas, not about Anchorage or other assorted population centers. Also, I'm talking abut SE Alaska and not the land farther north.

Sockeye subsistence usually runs something like 20 fish per person for 5 or 6 days. 100 sockeye is over 2K on the market, easy. Along with halibut subsistence, which varies depending on which halibut cop is where, that's more than enough fish to last you the rest of the year. It's easy enough to get a deer or two, and you can hunt wild ducks in the fall. Black bear hunting is year-round in most places in SE.

Don't buy meat in a rural Alaskan grocery store unless you just have to have a beef fix now and then. Bread--probably best to make it yourself if you can, if not, you'll be able to afford a loaf once a week, but Alaska grocery store bread isn't very good, and you might just learn to do without it. Buy Jiffy-mix in bulk for biscuits and pancakes. You might want to learn to make beer if that's your thing. You won't be able to make actual wine because grapes don't grow that far north, but you could make some from berries I suppose.

Anyway, after you get established, there's no reason why you couldn't meet all of your protein needs with hunting and fishing.

You can grow all your own potatoes and some other cool-season vegetables, and you can also cultivate wild plants. Beach greens are good blanched with garlic (you can grow garlic, chives, and some kinds of onions). And then there are berries -- very rich in vitamin C. Pick them when you can during the summer; they're everywhere. You'll need a good vacuum sealer, a chest freezer, and canning supplies.

As far as electricity, just get a generator. You won't need it much during the summer, and even in the winter, there's something really restful about kerosene lamplight.

Last edited by Metlakatla; 03-18-2014 at 08:59 PM..
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Old 03-18-2014, 08:41 PM
 
20,417 posts, read 26,539,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hippyman View Post
Here's the thing, I'm kind of in the same spot as the OP. I'm not physically disabled, per se, but I do have to take daily meds to keep my stress levels under control. And the more I'm around civilization, the more I notice it stressing me out. I just about got laughed off another board for questions like this, so bear with me, but what do you mean by "they often don't anymore?" I know I want to get away from the tourist areas, if possible, and build an Earthship type dwelling.
What's the lowest temps that Earthships can survive in?

One of the great things about Alaska is that you can be close to things that you need such as a Post Office for med deliveries etc. while still basically living in the wilderness.

The thing is is that the farther north you go, the more difficult it is to get most of your food from the land. If you want a truly hermit-like existence, you probably shouldn't go north of the panhandle.

The old-school bush pilots who used to do mail drops for remote homes have largely disappeared, but it's possible to have anything flown out to you if you can pay the price. The last I checked, the cheapest non-commercial small-plane flight cost over $450, but prices vary all over the state.

What's the most contact with civilization that you can happily stand? Also, remember that civilization in Alaska is different outside of the populated areas. A town of 200, for instance, with a store, a gas station, and a few scattered houses is considered civilization in some places.
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Old 03-18-2014, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Texas
38 posts, read 75,264 times
Reputation: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
What's the lowest temps that Earthships can survive in?

One of the great things about Alaska is that you can be close to things that you need such as a Post Office for med deliveries etc. while still basically living in the wilderness.

The thing is is that the farther north you go, the more difficult it is to get most of your food from the land. If you want a truly hermit-like existence, you probably shouldn't go north of the panhandle.

The old-school bush pilots who used to do mail drops for remote homes have largely disappeared, but it's possible to have anything flown out to you if you can pay the price. The last I checked, the cheapest non-commercial small-plane flight cost over $450, but prices vary all over the state.

What's the most contact with civilization that you can happily stand? Also, remember that civilization in Alaska is different outside of the populated areas. A town of 200, for instance, with a store, a gas station, and a few scattered houses is considered civilization in some places.

^^^This, is why I need to visit at least 2 more times before moving up, the last time I went, I only saw the tourist route. I can substitute deer for beef anytime, so food isn't an issue. To give you some perspective, I use to have 2 vacant lots behind where I live now. When someone built on them, along with my other neighbors, I was feeling crowded. I think I could go for a town of 200, like you mentioned. And according to their website, Earthships maintain a comfortable interior temperature while the outside temperature drops down to -20F, outside

Last edited by hippyman; 03-18-2014 at 09:08 PM..
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Old 03-18-2014, 09:38 PM
 
20,417 posts, read 26,539,344 times
Reputation: 13111
Let's see -- have you been to Thorne Bay? Although it does get summer visitors, it isn't really that touristy -- mostly sports fishing types, and they usually keep to themselves in private lodges. It's off the cruise ship path, so it doesn't get the huge, maddening hordes. Land around there seems somewhat reasonably priced, and you could easily get an isolated feel without being more than a few miles from the PO and store.

Someone mentioned earlier that gas is more expensive in Alaska, and that's certainly true, but when you live rural/remote, you're just not driving that much unless you're out around Willow or something commuting into Anchorage.

I don't know if this would be a resource for you, but if not, others might find it helpful:

Ionia | Where Common Sense Comes Alive
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