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Old 06-10-2015, 05:10 PM
 
8,167 posts, read 5,742,333 times
Reputation: 11621

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Instead of planning to move up there on your $3000, I would use that money to make a long visit first. Alaska is a great place, but the reality of it might not be what you have constructed in your mind. Also if possible, don't visit for the first time in the summer - visit in the winter. Another thing that I noticed, and while this is not universal, Alaskans are very friendly with visitors but somewhat wary of newcomers from down south.

I'm not trying to dissuade you from going, but moving to Alaska is a huge move. I flew to Kenai very recently and it took me longer to get there than it did for someone I know to fly back from Turkey. You really do need to budget money to get back if things don't work out, and that emergency ticket is likely to encumber about a third of your $3000.

Just trying to help. Best of luck in whatever you decide to do though.
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Old 06-10-2015, 08:19 PM
 
180 posts, read 209,405 times
Reputation: 190
Lunatoc, I wish you the best of luck starting a new life, I just believe it will not be with the Alaska fishing industry, not because of your priors but because it is a difficult thing to break in to, especially with the TV shows out there saying there is a ton of money to be made.

An Alaska Captain hires between 2 and 10 or so crew for the season. Most they know or come recommended by other captains or crew. Seasons are short, no matter that they go from one fish to another, the whole "fishing season" is short and then the boats stack down, most in Seattle.

Every spare inch of a boat is reserved for catch. You don't say you have been on a boat. Watch the shows, those boats HEAVE, buck, you can barely stand up. If you are sick too bad. You can't walk, and there is no turning back and you become a burden and that ends your chances. They are there to make money for their families...not because they are rich. They have a few months to make enough to pay for everything that happens to their boats, their homes, their expenses so they are really touchy about taking on a greenhorn even if the person is willing to do the back breaking, hand ripping work.

You need to supply your own gear. Look it up on cabela's or noreaster, it is not cheap. And you can't just throw a jacket over jeans and go. We are talking freezing to death, hypo thermia. The captain won't take you on just because you are likeable. Greenhorn more means a kid who grew up in the community, probably worked on the family boat and then wants to get on his own.

Work your way up? There is no up, there is crew and captains. There are not really any bigger ships, they are all about the same in Alaska, no fleet ships, etc. It is like being a farmer, or rancher, you depend on the season, luck and nature, and good seasons cover bad.

$3k is not going to see you through the gear, supplies, trip, with room to go home. Where would you store your car while you were on a boat.

I know this sounds hopeless, but maybe you could do something like join the military. I know you are worried about your felonies but it depends on what they were and when they were. You might check into it. Maybe you could have the judge or probatiion officer vouch for you. It would be a massive challenge, get you away and give you something to build on, but just be straight with them. Try getting your probation officer to talk to them. Best of Luck and future to you.

Can I Join the Army with a Felony? - Enlist - MilitarySpot.com
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Old 06-10-2015, 10:57 PM
 
23 posts, read 31,061 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetakai View Post
Lunatoc, I wish you the best of luck starting a new life, I just believe it will not be with the Alaska fishing industry, not because of your priors but because it is a difficult thing to break in to, especially with the TV shows out there saying there is a ton of money to be made.

An Alaska Captain hires between 2 and 10 or so crew for the season. Most they know or come recommended by other captains or crew. Seasons are short, no matter that they go from one fish to another, the whole "fishing season" is short and then the boats stack down, most in Seattle.

Every spare inch of a boat is reserved for catch. You don't say you have been on a boat. Watch the shows, those boats HEAVE, buck, you can barely stand up. If you are sick too bad. You can't walk, and there is no turning back and you become a burden and that ends your chances. They are there to make money for their families...not because they are rich. They have a few months to make enough to pay for everything that happens to their boats, their homes, their expenses so they are really touchy about taking on a greenhorn even if the person is willing to do the back breaking, hand ripping work.

You need to supply your own gear. Look it up on cabela's or noreaster, it is not cheap. And you can't just throw a jacket over jeans and go. We are talking freezing to death, hypo thermia. The captain won't take you on just because you are likeable. Greenhorn more means a kid who grew up in the community, probably worked on the family boat and then wants to get on his own.

Work your way up? There is no up, there is crew and captains. There are not really any bigger ships, they are all about the same in Alaska, no fleet ships, etc. It is like being a farmer, or rancher, you depend on the season, luck and nature, and good seasons cover bad.

$3k is not going to see you through the gear, supplies, trip, with room to go home. Where would you store your car while you were on a boat.

I know this sounds hopeless, but maybe you could do something like join the military. I know you are worried about your felonies but it depends on what they were and when they were. You might check into it. Maybe you could have the judge or probatiion officer vouch for you. It would be a massive challenge, get you away and give you something to build on, but just be straight with them. Try getting your probation officer to talk to them. Best of Luck and future to you.

Can I Join the Army with a Felony? - Enlist - MilitarySpot.com
Thanks, but I've tried. I'm just trying to do something with myself that intrigues me. Something adventurous.
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Old 06-11-2015, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
2,561 posts, read 3,949,349 times
Reputation: 1918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lunatoc View Post
Thanks, but I've tried. I'm just trying to do something with myself that intrigues me. Something adventurous.
To be clear... I'm not saying don't come up. I'm just saying to come up with realistic expectations and a back up plan if things do not work out.
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Old 06-11-2015, 02:50 PM
 
23 posts, read 31,061 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by AKStafford View Post
To be clear... I'm not saying don't come up. I'm just saying to come up with realistic expectations and a back up plan if things do not work out.
Yeah. I'll probably extend my funds now that I realize the costs of getting there. Plus the cost to get back if it didn't work. I did apply on the seasonal job page you sent me. I applied to 2 or 3 places. Hopefully I will hear something back if its not to late in the season. 16 hours a day 7 days a week for 2 or 3 months i a lot of work but I know I could do it. I appreciate the link. I never would have known there were jobs like that. And all I have to do is pay to get to seattle WA and they do the rest.
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Old 06-11-2015, 08:20 PM
 
Location: In my own world
878 posts, read 1,397,237 times
Reputation: 1027
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lunatoc View Post
...I've just made mistakes that I paid for and am still paying for. Its crazy how being a felon automatically strips you of rights and other things. My whole reason for wanting to move to Alaska is just because I believe I need a change in my life, I need to get away from where I'm at for my own personal reasons...
It's not crazy to me. Felonies are BAD. That's why they're felonies. I don't expect you to get into what you did here, but you did bad stuff, and you should pay for it. By and large, felons are dangerous people. You sound like you have your head screwed on somewhat straight, so I hope you can turn your life around, and honestly if I were a business owner hiring, I might give a young guy like you a second chance. But it's risky. Felonious beahvior is nothing to take lightly. Your crimes undoubtedly affected other people. Good luck.
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Old 06-11-2015, 10:55 PM
 
23 posts, read 31,061 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by NomadicBear View Post
It's not crazy to me. Felonies are BAD. That's why they're felonies. I don't expect you to get into what you did here, but you did bad stuff, and you should pay for it. By and large, felons are dangerous people. You sound like you have your head screwed on somewhat straight, so I hope you can turn your life around, and honestly if I were a business owner hiring, I might give a young guy like you a second chance. But it's risky. Felonious beahvior is nothing to take lightly. Your crimes undoubtedly affected other people. Good luck.
That's kind of stereotypical to say that felons are dangerous people. Not all felonies are the same therefore not all felons are the same. And to say felons are dangerous people is also putting a cap on them to say that they can and never will change. That because they made a mistake and got caught for it that they're automatically more dangerous than anybody in the room. I refuse to believe that logic. I'm a felon and so are a couple of other people I know. They're good people who just made mistakes. Some felons, I will agree, are dangerous. The nature of their crimes will point that out. But also there is a story behind every face. Everybody makes mistakes. Some people just get caught. Your neighbor could be the most dangerous person on your block and have a clean record. Some people are just better at getting away with stuff. But I'm done ranting. Have a nice night..
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Old 06-12-2015, 07:09 PM
 
Location: In my own world
878 posts, read 1,397,237 times
Reputation: 1027
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lunatoc View Post
That's kind of stereotypical to say that felons are dangerous people. Not all felonies are the same therefore not all felons are the same. And to say felons are dangerous people is also putting a cap on them to say that they can and never will change. That because they made a mistake and got caught for it that they're automatically more dangerous than anybody in the room. I refuse to believe that logic. I'm a felon and so are a couple of other people I know. They're good people who just made mistakes. Some felons, I will agree, are dangerous. The nature of their crimes will point that out. But also there is a story behind every face. Everybody makes mistakes. Some people just get caught. Your neighbor could be the most dangerous person on your block and have a clean record. Some people are just better at getting away with stuff. But I'm done ranting. Have a nice night..
People who engage in felonious behavior but have not been caught are just as dangerous as those who have been caught. The behavior is the problem. The fact that you were unlucky enough to be caught doesn't change the fact that there's something wrong in your decision making process to be engaging in the behavior in the first place. You posed a danger to society in the past. Whether or not you have changed is another matter. But by your latest post I'd say no, you haven't.
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Old 06-12-2015, 10:28 PM
TKO
 
Location: On the Border
2,226 posts, read 2,822,725 times
Reputation: 2012
The most common felonies are non-violent and drug related. Our prisons are full to the brim with non-violent felony drug offenders doing serious time. These non-violent drug offenders will be released one day as felonious convicts. They will encounter many nice, decent people, who've understandably never had direct dealings with our criminal justice system, that will think they're dangerous felons who pose a menace to society even though they don't have a violent bone in their body.

I'm not excusing drug related (or any) crime. You break the law no matter your opinion of that law, you run the risk. But there is a limit to how harshly we should take people's pasts - we have to look at the individual before we come to generalized assumptions.

It's a shame you can't drive, Lunatoc, because it's awesome, but the ferry is fun too. When I took it from Bellingham to Whittier, I had a blast. A good number of the people I spent time with on the boat were on it because they couldn't drive through Canada due to their record. I found them to be excellent company.
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Old 06-12-2015, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Kirkland, WA (Metro Seattle)
3,458 posts, read 2,848,140 times
Reputation: 5955
Quote:
Originally Posted by AKStafford View Post
That's a very good point. You might have better luck walking the docks in Seattle...
That's a non-starter too, btw. That kind of thing went out of style around the Clinton Administration. It's a bit higher-tech in the the hiring these days, they say. Local papers do stories on this from time to time here in Seattle. LOL. You're a pleasant bunch, all-considered, on this thread.

Threads like this are invariably people running away from something. Not realizing that whatever "it" is usually follows them, one way or another, since the patterns of behavior that caused the trouble to begin with don't easily change. They pop up in Seattle from time to time, with zero skills and wanting to "move to Seattle" and find "cheap housing" without any freakin' clue it's very expensive and the only work that pays non-ghetto wages is in high tech, which means equally-high skills, experience, and education (or general smarts). Whatever. With rents for nice two-bdrm in good areas at $2,400/month for a newer place, they're weeded out quickly.

I've learned just a little more about commercial fishing from this thread, then, too. Being in Seattle, I'm well aware the boats depart from around here, and points north (out in the Orcas Islands, Anacortes, elsewhere) and there's a whole process around getting connected to that, so to speak. That comes from paying attention to the news and reading the business section, monitoring sectors relevant to the economy of my home area. Guess I'd do that kind of homework if moving somewhere else and wouldn't move an inch without solid plans.

Not knowing one needs a passport to enter Canada is along the same lines of asking if one can "show up to the docks" and find "cheap lodging" in (points unknown), Alaska. Advices around here suggest that was all done by the 1980s or 1990s, as-mentioned.

Enjoyed taking BC Ferries from Port Hardy, northern end of Vancouver Island, to Prince Rupert this time last year, as an aside. Boy was that an enjoyable trip, with nice-enough cabins. Think it ran me $500 or so to haul me and my motorcycle up there, plus the lodging on-boat. More on-point to the topic: I see from that ferries site early in the thread it ain't cheap to get a cabin Bellingham to Alaska, either, as someone pointed out. If there is one to be had: didn't seem like it, June-August. That would follow, given the short season.

And yeah, speaking of passports: completing an interview for NEXUS pass (semi-free reign to roam into and out of Canada without much border hassle) was rather arduous via Homeland, and Canada had a hand in the security check too. The Canadians were pretty serious during the interview. Few, if-any, crimes or arrests would NOT have raised red flags. I'm really not into "felonies" or drunken stupidity, though, now or ever. Tough old world these days, for-sure.
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