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Old 09-14-2015, 07:36 PM
 
1,531 posts, read 880,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Music_Man View Post
With how many gas stations?
Is it three?
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Old 09-14-2015, 07:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by It is 57 below zero View Post
After Coldfoot, there aren't any resources for a long while (about 250 miles I think?) on the highway until the northern end of it reached at Deadhorse. That's easily over 4 hours, and all I can say is be very well prepared. Try not to go alone if you can help it, or at least notify someone where you are. Bring extra supplies (including extra gas tanks) if you need to.

Coldfoot also is (or used to be) a train stop, so that's an isolated town with surface transportation for sure.
4 hours with lower 48 roads...
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Old 09-14-2015, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Illinois
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haolejohn View Post
4 hours with lower 48 roads...
Or, maybe give or take.

I know that some parts of Alaska (and Hawaii, for that matter) tend to have lower speed limits than most other states, particularly on unpaved roads, and some people may not drive too fast because they could damage their car.
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Old 09-14-2015, 07:58 PM
 
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Originally Posted by It is 57 below zero View Post
Or, maybe give or take.

I know that some parts of Alaska (and Hawaii, for that matter) tend to have lower speed limits than most other states, particularly on unpaved roads, and some people may not drive too fast because they could damage their car.
No, they don't drive too fast on unpaved roads because they don't want to lose their lives.

Seriously...this is getting real old.
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Old 09-14-2015, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Anchorage
742 posts, read 468,295 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by It is 57 below zero View Post
Coldfoot also is (or used to be) a train stop, so that's an isolated town with surface transportation for sure.
Explain "train stop".
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Old 09-14-2015, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Kenai
17 posts, read 17,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by It is 57 below zero View Post
Coldfoot also is (or used to be) a train stop, so that's an isolated town with surface transportation for sure.
The railroad ends in Fairbanks, 260 miles south of coldfoot. How exactly is it a train stop? There has never been a railroad line there.
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Old 09-15-2015, 12:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by It is 57 below zero View Post
Nor do I know any towns outside of Alaska that exist without road access except maybe a few isolated islands.
Stehekin, WA
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Old 09-18-2015, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
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Originally Posted by Haolejohn View Post
Yep. The amount of time and money to build would be astronomical and wouldn't come close to costs to maintain. Almost every community doesn't want that road to be built.
Having had no experience of living in a village so isolated that it has no road access, this is something that I'm curious about. Suppose that truckloads of money just fell out of the sky one day, so the financial issue wasn't a factor. My question is, would the residents of these remote villages actually want to be connected with the outside world via year-round highway access? Do people who live in these places prefer to be off the beaten path, or do they simply accept it as the way things are, whether they like it or not?

Also, would the same hold true for the larger towns? My understanding is that Juneau is the most populous town in Alaska that is not connected to the outside world via road access (though they do have the ferry system). Again assuming that money was not an issue, would the people there want to be able to drive to the rest of the state? What about someplace like Barrow, a relatively sizable town which is also not on the road network and does not have car-ferry service? Would they want to be able to drive elsewhere, or are they content to have their access limited to airplanes and summertime barges?
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Old 09-18-2015, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
4,019 posts, read 2,381,191 times
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Originally Posted by It is 57 below zero View Post
I haven't been on this forum in like 4 days, and I'm still incessantly being talked about badly. To put it to y'all straight up and honest, I post here because I'm seriously in love with Alaska and plan to live there soon and it's most of the reason for my particular identification name on here. It's a great state and the only thing it lacks is an urban area.
I have read that you have not actually visited Alaska. Is this true? If so, I'm sure you can imagine that before you pull up stakes and move there, you should pay it a visit and see it with your own eyes.

I am not an Alaska expert and have never claimed to be. But I have been there -- once, for a two-week trip in 2005. I loved every minute of it. I was in awe of Alaska's indescribably beautiful scenery; I thoroughly enjoyed picking up tiny snippets of local culture and history; and I was most pleased to engage in conversations with the very friendly people who call that state their home. Alaska was everything I had ever imagined it would be, and so much more.

Would I want to visit again? In a heartbeat. Would I want to live there? Not a single chance in the world. This is nothing at all against Alaska, because Alaska is what it is, and it doesn't pretend to be anything else. But the kind of place in which I want to live is not the kind of place that Alaska is. And this is something that I really would not have fully known, had I not visited.

57 Below, I really do hope that you will visit Alaska and see it for yourself, and do this before packing your bags and moving there. You may well decide that it is the perfect home for you. Or, you may find it to be like I do: an amazingly fantastic place to visit, but someplace that you may decide is not really right for you as a place to put down roots and call home.
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Old 09-18-2015, 11:30 AM
 
1,531 posts, read 880,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bus man View Post
Having had no experience of living in a village so isolated that it has no road access, this is something that I'm curious about. Suppose that truckloads of money just fell out of the sky one day, so the financial issue wasn't a factor. My question is, would the residents of these remote villages actually want to be connected with the outside world via year-round highway access? Do people who live in these places prefer to be off the beaten path, or do they simply accept it as the way things are, whether they like it or not?

Also, would the same hold true for the larger towns? My understanding is that Juneau is the most populous town in Alaska that is not connected to the outside world via road access (though they do have the ferry system). Again assuming that money was not an issue, would the people there want to be able to drive to the rest of the state? What about someplace like Barrow, a relatively sizable town which is also not on the road network and does not have car-ferry service? Would they want to be able to drive elsewhere, or are they content to have their access limited to airplanes and summertime barges?
My experience was in very small villages. If you look at the middle of the state, that was where I came from. The GASH villages. I do know that the general consensus was that the Native population just don't want outsiders. These communities are totally different than Juneau or other hubs. Most villages are Native (like 90 plus %) and a road would bring about a destruction to way of life as they know it. Yes the economic advantage would be nice, but in reality I don't think it would make that big of a difference. When there is only one store, they can charge whatever they want, regardless of their costs. McGrath is a prime example. Their gas prices have not come down (at least I don't think it has) compared to the rest of the state. Why? Only one provider.

A lot of the backlash on a road is the environmental impact on subsistence activities. A road will bring in hunters for a fraction of the cost of a flight. No Bueno when you depend on that moose meat for survival.
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