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Old 05-16-2016, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
2,367 posts, read 3,334,785 times
Reputation: 1644

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You'll want a copy of the Milepost. The Bible of North Country Travel - The MILEPOST
I've done the drive multiple times in February. Twice in a Subaru Justy and once with a uHaul van towing a trailer with a car on it. So it's doable.
Know that it can ridiculously cold. Gas stations and civilization can a couple of hundred miles apart. You won't have cell service. But man, it's a beautiful drive!
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Old 05-16-2016, 11:18 PM
 
21 posts, read 10,936 times
Reputation: 25
Yep my copy of the milepost is on its way! Heard nothing but good things about it
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Old 05-16-2016, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Back and Beyond
1,995 posts, read 1,595,720 times
Reputation: 4148
Riceme, I think I have the most expensive tow in history but maybe your friend has me beat. I once drove a UHaul into a snowbank 18 miles outside of Cantwell in a whiteout like I've never seen. Anyways, tow was $240 for the tow into cantwell plus a $300 "ditch removal fee". I passed at least a dozen vehicles in the ditch on the way into cantwell including semis, which made me feel slightly less retarded as I swore I was driving on the road. The tow truck driver must have made over $5k that night as it was when they rerouted the Iditarod to start in fairbanks and everyone was coming up through the bad storm. Highway robbery, but I had no choice but to pay considering the circumstances. I promptly bought the most AAA road coverage I could get right after that.

Semis travel the road year round as well as personal trailers so it can be done depending on your experience level. Your truck will need to be winterized (block heater, oil pan heater, battery blanket or trickle charger, and antifreeze/fluids for cold temps) to be 100% safe or always left on if/when it's extremely cold. I'm a firm believer in dedicated winter tires, although some people claim they do fine with all seasons. I'd bring a few spares for the trailer, extreme winter gear (parkas, bunny boots, mittens, etc) for everyone in vehicle, another way to stay warm in an emergency, extra food, water and fuel. Get a copy of the most recent milepost and drive on the top half of your tank.
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Old 05-16-2016, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Inyourdreams, Alaska
1,605 posts, read 1,203,474 times
Reputation: 1007
Quote:
Originally Posted by laugel View Post
Ive mapped out the stops best i can so far from milepost major places and etc. No i planned on bringing about 35 gallons extra of diesel (truck is 36 gal tank). My trailer has a generator on it compressor, toolbox etc. My side by side is also enclosed cab with heater. **** does happen no doubt that why im asking you guys to get an idea for everything i need or may encounter. If its something that isnt doable then i wont. I just wanted to plan ahead.
I hauled 20 gallons when I had a 4-cyl Tacoma with a 16-gal tank and drove up in October, meaning all the fuel stations were still open. I only had to use 10-gallons of it... 5-gal after I missed the fuel station in Iskut (they closed early for "Canadian Thanksgiving," whatever the hell that is) and 5-gal in... Watson Lake, I think. I got there in the middle of the night and had to drive out of town to find somewhere to camp. Anyhow, I'd bring more fuel if I were you but I'm always over-prepared, which you would sure want to be if you drove up in winter. The guys who've drove it in the winter can for sure tell you better.

Oh god, and food. Bring food and water from the states. Food in Canada is god awful expensive. Oh, don't forget to keep your water in the cab of the pickup so it's not solid when you need it, haha.
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Old 05-16-2016, 11:39 PM
 
21 posts, read 10,936 times
Reputation: 25
Thanks. Candian thanksgiving haha that made me laugh pretty good. Yes water and food no doubt. Definatly will bring a spare electric heater. Worst case senerio if we got stranded and could get truck out with atvs and winch. Or truck broke down i could always run the generator until we got help.(or drive rzr into town since it has cab and heat) as long as it was close and conditions were favorable. My extended warrenty i purchased is suppose to have roadside assistance and broke down reimbursment etc. But i have a feeling in the middle of the yukon that gets thrown out the window lol
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Old 05-16-2016, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Inyourdreams, Alaska
1,605 posts, read 1,203,474 times
Reputation: 1007
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6.7traveler View Post
Riceme, I think I have the most expensive tow in history but maybe your friend has me beat. I once drove a UHaul into a snowbank 18 miles outside of Cantwell in a whiteout like I've never seen. Anyways, tow was $240 for the tow into cantwell plus a $300 "ditch removal fee". I passed at least a dozen vehicles in the ditch on the way into cantwell including semis, which made me feel slightly less retarded as I swore I was driving on the road. The tow truck driver must have made over $5k that night as it was when they rerouted the Iditarod to start in fairbanks and everyone was coming up through the bad storm. Highway robbery, but I had no choice but to pay considering the circumstances. I promptly bought the most AAA road coverage I could get right after that.

Semis travel the road year round as well as personal trailers so it can be done depending on your experience level. Your truck will need to be winterized to be safe and always left on or plugged in if/when it's extremely cold. I'm a firm believer in dedicated winter tires, although some people claim they do fine with all seasons. I'd bring a few spares for the trailer, extreme winter gear (parkas, bunny boots, mittens, etc) for everyone in vehicle, another way to stay warm in an emergency, extra food, water and fuel. Get a copy of the most recent milepost and drive on the top half of your tank.
LOL @ "ditch removal fee." I'm going to have to remember that next winter when people start calling me to pull them out of the ditch.

You're right, my cousin and her husband's tow was a lot more expensive. They ended up having to get towed several hundred miles to get to the mechanic. I'll have to ask her where it was to and from because I no longer remember. She will probably tell me something like "We got towed from 300 miles south of BFE, YT to BFE, YT."

Good point about the AAA. For the OP, the only AAA that's good in Canada is AAA Plus and you have to have been a regular member for at least 90 days before you can be a Plus member. With AAA Plus you can get towed up to 100-miles before you have to start paying out of your own pocket.

I will second 6.7's opinion on winter tires, spares and winter gear. I am a firm believer in Blizzaks and bunny boots, but winter tires are like pickups. There are Ford guys, Chevy guys and Cummins guys (never met a Dodge guy, lol. Don't mind a little friendly ribbing). Everyone has a tire they prefer. I like Blizzaks.
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Old 05-16-2016, 11:46 PM
 
18,629 posts, read 23,459,133 times
Reputation: 10033
I'm confused. Is this really C-D? Someone is actually posting here asking about the drive up on the AlCan in winter who doesn't plan on driving a tin can with bald tires and no budget?

Last edited by Metlakatla; 05-16-2016 at 11:57 PM..
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Old 05-16-2016, 11:57 PM
 
21 posts, read 10,936 times
Reputation: 25
I will have spares for sure, as for winter tires ill look into but man those load range E tires are expensive. But cant put a price on being safe....im new to this websight just googled driving to alaska and saw this and joined. Appreciate you guys help
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Old 05-17-2016, 12:03 AM
 
18,629 posts, read 23,459,133 times
Reputation: 10033
LOL, read this thread and then do everything opposite from this guy and you'll be fine.

So I currently live near Chicago, Illinois. I applied for a job in Fairbanks Alaska making really good money. I was w
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Old 05-17-2016, 12:04 AM
 
Location: Anchorage
676 posts, read 387,807 times
Reputation: 692
Be ready for buffalo on the road. and your battery being dead in the morning. Things act differently at -40f. Just do it and let us know how it worked out for you. Another vote for the snowmachine, many more places to go than with an ATV.
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