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Old 10-26-2017, 11:57 AM
 
1,782 posts, read 1,178,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
Then we see it differently. Eating is about survival; wearing furs is about vanity. Trapping is a gruesome way for a wild creature to die; hunting at least is usual a swift kill (in case someone comes along and starts blaring about what about the time my uncle shot a deer and only wounded it and blah blah it ran though the woods blah and died a blah blah gory death somewhere because we blah couldn't find it blah -- fing save your straw men for someone else). There's a market for them, btw. I imagine many of the animals Marty kills end up in Asia as well as in the closets of vapid Eurotrash.
I used to feel that way, until I spent a winter in the interior. Now, I wear a fur hat. Though, only when it is cold.


However, for most, it is vanity.
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Old 10-26-2017, 12:27 PM
 
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I've spent plenty of winters in the interior.
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Old 10-26-2017, 12:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RexLan View Post
I don't see many folks wearing fur in the USA anymore. I think that has gone by the wayside and perhaps it is still fashionable in Europe.

The fur is mostly for Chinese and Russian markets now. But I don't understand people having a problem trapping and wearing fur (a natural, renewable resource) when the alternative is generally wearing clothing made from petroleum products.
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Old 10-26-2017, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Alexander Archipelago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timberline742 View Post
The fur is mostly for Chinese and Russian markets now. But I don't understand people having a problem trapping and wearing fur (a natural, renewable resource) when the alternative is generally wearing clothing made from petroleum products.
Don't the Russians have enough of their own critters?

I think of cotton and wool as renewable resources, but IMO it's not quite the right term for a dead animal.

Trapping invasive species is OK by me. Lynx in Alaska? Nope.
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Old 10-26-2017, 02:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blind Cleric View Post
Don't the Russians have enough of their own critters?

I think of cotton and wool as renewable resources, but IMO it's not quite the right term for a dead animal.

Trapping invasive species is OK by me. Lynx in Alaska? Nope.


The fur trade, like most other natural resources, is global in nature. The auctions are international. Much of the U.S. harvest is sold through Canadian auction houses, in fact.


And game animals, fish, wild edibles, and timber, are all renewable resources that can be sustainably harvested when properly managed.


Cotton is not a renewable resource, since it doesn't get replenished naturally in time. Wool wouldn't be either, if it is farmed sheep... catching and shearing wild sheep would be, but I doubt anyone in North America does much of that as they are game animals.
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Old 10-26-2017, 03:02 PM
 
Location: interior Alaska
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haolejohn View Post
I used to feel that way, until I spent a winter in the interior. Now, I wear a fur hat. Though, only when it is cold.


However, for most, it is vanity.
Yeah, I've yet to find a synthetic material that's as warm and comfortable as certain furs. I don't wear showy furs but I like a wild fur ruff and/or lining in parts of my winter gear for when I'm going to be outside for a long time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blind Cleric View Post
I think of cotton and wool as renewable resources, but IMO it's not quite the right term for a dead animal.
Cotton is pretty terrible for the environment.
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Old 10-26-2017, 04:28 PM
 
Location: The Woods
16,459 posts, read 21,517,295 times
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I've never found a warmer hat than my beaver fur hat. When it hits 20 or 30 below I pull out the fur hat. Being familiar with what oil spills do to the environment including wildlife, I'll take fur over petroleum products. Provided there's some standards to keep the trapping as humane as possible. I've trapped, there's good and bad ways to go about it.
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Old 10-26-2017, 05:03 PM
 
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Qiviut's probably warmer than most types of furs; it can be worn under the hat in windy conditions.

This guy's market, though, isn't the occasional consumer living in a harsh environment who likes furs as protective wear. BTW, caribou fur is damned warm and the animals are killed for meat and bone.

It's not a "sustainable eco-issue" to me, although recycled fabrics seem like a pretty good alternative to cotton and synthetic fabrics if anyone's concerned (fur can also be repurposed, for that matter).

By the way, cotton actually is a "renewable resource according to the true definition of the term.
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Old 10-26-2017, 06:08 PM
 
Location: interior Alaska
4,002 posts, read 2,987,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metlakatla View Post
Qiviut's probably warmer than most types of furs; it can be worn under the hat in windy conditions.
It's also really expensive, and most clothing made out of it is rather delicate.
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Old 10-26-2017, 11:27 PM
 
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I thought qiviut was pretty durable.

I knew a couple of trappers in the interior. Both had done hard time for something ghastly, I'm sure, and both had noticeable issues with firewater as well as lacked basic knowledge of manners and hygiene.
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