U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Alaska
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 02-24-2018, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Alexander Archipelago
2,803 posts, read 1,497,897 times
Reputation: 2750

Advertisements

Woohoo! We're # 1 again, according to Forbes magazine.

But wait, it's for toxins released into the environment. Oh Well, I guess someone's gotta do it.

(Due to Red Dog mine, with its rich supplies of lead and zinc.)

https://www.forbes.com/sites/priceon.../#18ddc4f04ac1
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-24-2018, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,171 posts, read 27,428,664 times
Reputation: 11838
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blind Cleric View Post
Woohoo! We're # 1 again, according to Forbes magazine.

But wait, it's for toxins released into the environment. Oh Well, I guess someone's gotta do it.

(Due to Red Dog mine, with its rich supplies of lead and zinc.)

https://www.forbes.com/sites/priceon.../#18ddc4f04ac1
Ha! That is nothing compared to the traces of plastic compounds in our bodies, not only in Alaska, but the rest of the US and Europe.

This one is just about according to some news I read recently, 99% of German children of the age 14-18 (something like that), have traces of plastics in their bodies.
Plastic chemical linked to male infertility in majority of teenagers, study suggests*

However, plastics contain not only BPA, but other chemicals that nobody knows how harmful they can be. Just look around your kitchen and notice all the foods that are wrapped in plastic. Even the coffee maker is made of plastics.

And don't forget that a little zinc is good for a healthy prostate

~Sorry. I just thought about that one and could not help myself. I apologize to anybody I may offend.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-25-2018, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Alexander Archipelago
2,803 posts, read 1,497,897 times
Reputation: 2750
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
Ha! That is nothing compared to the traces of plastic compounds in our bodies, not only in Alaska, but the rest of the US and Europe...


And don't forget that a little zinc is good for a healthy prostate

~Sorry. I just thought about that one and could not help myself. I apologize to anybody I may offend.

No offense taken here. I wasn't under the impression zinc was so bad for us either.

For sure we've all got a bunch of hormone disrupting plastics and other industrial toxins coursing through our veins, regardless of our location.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-25-2018, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Inland Empire, WA
2,133 posts, read 1,688,252 times
Reputation: 1691
How is released into the environment when it is a product of the environment? Ok, it is a rhetorical question, but I feel compelled to say it by their poor choice of words. I feel displaced, or redistributed is a much more correct term for definition.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-25-2018, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Interior Alaska
1,941 posts, read 1,688,007 times
Reputation: 1426
Here's a really neat weather map that I swiped from a geomorphology group that I follow. I have it set to particulates mode, particulate matter < 10, but if you click on "Earth" in the lower left corner you can change the settings to all sorts of different things.

In the "air" mode there's a Misery Index, which seems to be incorrectly calibrated. They think that +10*F is miserable when in fact that is a balmy February morning.

https://earth.nullschool.net/#curren...147.128,65.088
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-25-2018, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Interior Alaska
1,941 posts, read 1,688,007 times
Reputation: 1426
I was kind of wondering if it was the zinc itself or the byproducts from mining the zinc that's so bad. I've asked Dr. Google and I am still not really sure. Maybe I need more coffee.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-25-2018, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,171 posts, read 27,428,664 times
Reputation: 11838
Quote:
Originally Posted by AK76 View Post
How is released into the environment when it is a product of the environment? Ok, it is a rhetorical question, but I feel compelled to say it by their poor choice of words. I feel displaced, or redistributed is a much more correct term for definition.
Good points. Everything about the news articles of today is about raising alarms.

Sometime ago Ambler was on the news relating to asbestos fibers in the air. Some of the grounds in Ambler contain asbestos. For years this was mentioned in the asbestos-worker refresher classes in Alaska, but I have no idea what resulted from the EPA studies that were taking place.

Last edited by RayinAK; 02-25-2018 at 12:21 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Alaska
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top