U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Alaska
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-18-2008, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Sandhills
2,177 posts, read 3,049,433 times
Reputation: 2740

Advertisements

I cannot believe I just read 148 pages of this topic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-19-2008, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Rural NY
94 posts, read 229,054 times
Reputation: 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woof View Post
I've never eaten antelope, elk, or moose. I do know that to make tough, gamey venison taste better, you trim any visible fat and parboil it in lots of water, then simmer it in a stew for hours. A little red wine won't hurt the stew a bit.

$10,000 rifle?! I've never spent more than $200 .... usually military surplus. I could see though where someone might spend $800 for a decent new scoped rifle, if they weren't budget-minded like me ..... oh, why don't I just say it outright, I'm so cheap that I pinch pennies until they scream, and pinch nickels until the buffalo sh*ts.
My many years of eating game led me to the conclusion that most of it stinks.

I've never had pheasant that even came close to being as good as a commercial meat chicken.

I've never had squirrel that was better than being barely edible.

Most venison (white-tail) I've had was barely edible. One exception was a young fawn that maybe wasn't even completely weaned yet. The meat looked like veal, and even at that, was not better than most beef.

The only way to make any of this stuff "good" is to parboil it (if old) and smother it with onions, garlic, pepper, and various other strong spices to cover up the real taste. And even with parboiling some things remain tough.

I like the taste of beef steak, and have no interest in "covering up" the true flavor with anything other than salt and pepper. With this frame of mind, nothing you ever do to venison will make it good unless you cover up the actual taste. I've taken fresh venison steaks and grilled them just like I would a beef steak, but they tasted lousy.

Now a lot of this can be attributed to how they were killed as people above mentioned. I raised hogs for years and butchered them myself, and the most important thing is for them to be calm and unexcited when killed, and they must be killed and bled quickly. This rarely happens with wild game.

I hear all the stories of the "Great White Hunters" around here claiming how good this or that tastes. But ALL the recipes involve smothering the meat with onions, garlic, and strong spices.

There is some satisfaction of hunting and processing it yourself into a freezer full of fresh, nutritious meat. But I see a lot of "hunters" spending untold amounts of money on guns, scopes, boots, special clothing, 4 wheelers, yadda yadda, the list is endless. In the end, IMO, they end up with a bunch of meat that tastes lousy but costs some multiple of what you can buy at the grocery store, which tastes good.

As for buffalo, (American Bison) my best friend has been raising them for 35 years. They live on grass pasture and hay in the winter. The meat is at least as good as any beef. The bulls do tend to be on the lean side. But a porterhouse, T-bone, or any other good cut from the cows will rival any beef out there. A lot of other people must think so also, because the prices are at least 50% higher than beef.

Oh well, this is just my life's experiences and how they have made me who I am. I'm sure plenty of people would disagree, and that's fine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-19-2008, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Palmer
2,518 posts, read 5,777,728 times
Reputation: 1360
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce 01 View Post

Oh well, this is just my life's experiences and how they have made me who I am. I'm sure plenty of people would disagree, and that's fine.
Yep, you are right.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-19-2008, 12:14 PM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,307 posts, read 11,579,232 times
Reputation: 8020
True, Bruce, but consider this: how good do the leanest cuts of beef such as London Broil taste? Pretty much as crappy as venison, right, except for having a milder flavor?

Game is extremely lean for the most part, other than raccoons, bears, and wild pigs (none of which I've eaten).

So the key is to cook it as you would the leanest cuts of beef and chicken, such as chicken breast.

Now it happens I never broil London broil, what I do with it is slice it thinly across the grain and stirfry it in lots of oil or bacon grease. The other thing I do is put it into a stew and very gently simmer it, not boiling it but just hot enough to see an occasional bubble rise.

Translating this into venison, you would have to take steps to get the gamey flavor out. One way is to soak the slices or chunks in milk overnight, the other way is to dip the chunks for stew in lots of boiling water for a minute or two, and then discard that water and go ahead with the stew. The stew should have some fat in it, either from a roux or from bacon or fatback.

You could use the flavorings that you'd use for a beef stew - garlic, bay leaves, black pepper, onion, soy sauce, a bit of wine, beef stock, a wee bit of sugar, etc.

Birds I would do the same way as I do chicken, which is exclusively slicing it against the grain and stir-frying it in lots of oil on high, or frying in butter on a medium heat.

Last edited by Woof; 10-19-2008 at 12:51 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-20-2008, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Naptowne, Alaska
15,594 posts, read 34,090,803 times
Reputation: 14628
I do the milk thing with moose meat. Makes all the difference.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-20-2008, 11:06 PM
 
3,714 posts, read 8,011,139 times
Reputation: 1402
The only venison I've ever had that tasted rank and gamey was one that was poached in eastern OR in February. It had been wintering on sagebrush, and did it ever taste like it! But all the deer I ever had in AK was tender and sweet, but they were also killed and bled and field dressed properly by people who actually knew what they were doing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-21-2008, 08:54 AM
 
Location: SoCal Sewer
410 posts, read 828,238 times
Reputation: 204
Let's see here,,,,,


Wild Game or factory/farm raised animals.

Give me the wild game any day. Just got to learn how to cook em right. Moose roast in the dutch oven with taters, carrots and onions, slow cooked at about 270 for a couple hours cannot be topped unless,,,

Venison marinated in homemade top secret Wild Game Marinade and BB-Q'd or slow smoked has swayed a vegan or two, no, sorry I can't say what's in it.

I like to eat food I can taste and savor. I enjoy the preparation just as much as the meal. When Rocky or Bugs are on the menu they get done as stew or in a split pea soup served up with sourdough. Waterfowl in garlic and butter in an iron skillet on a nice cool day is a tasty treat, stuff a bird with acorns or citrus fruit and BB-Q it. Ooh La La!

Sea food? Oh yeah, I catch it, grill it and eat it.

Bout the only thing I'll never try again is chitterlings.

Just me but, I'd rather stalk it, kill it, process it and grill it, than go to a meat counter at a grocery store. Taken at the right time of year and processed correctly wild game tastes much better than store bought beef, chicken or pork. So much for poached out of season game,,,,,

Getting ready for a trip out to the cousins in Wisconsin for Deer and Duck. Just put 300 pounds of Albacore in one of the freezers.

And on the subject of a $10,000.00 rifle,,,,,

Upon review of our plans to move on up there to AK, I did an inventory of the critter gitters I have currently and found I came up short on a bear gun. Got together with a few friends and started discussing it and one who has been there and done it, brought out his "bear" gun. A Heym 88B in .470NE Double Rifle. OMG! Then he brings out another double Heym in 9.3x74r.

Looks like the wanderer818 is going to get a new gun. The Redhead ain't never gonna give me the nod of approval on a 10k rifle so it looks like I'm gonna have to slip this one by her and be prepared to face the wrath of Red. Crap, this could cost me. But hell, ya only get one run here, so why not?

Maybe I can tell Red it's expensive cause it has two barells, not one.

Been so darn busy with all this darn family stuff I've had no time for catching up with all of you, NJmike, HL, GR, etc.,,,

When is the lone traveler due back from his adventure?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-21-2008, 09:02 AM
 
Location: South Dakota
4,137 posts, read 7,746,760 times
Reputation: 1914
Good to hear from you, Wanderer
LT attempted a new assault to our senses, something about coming broke and crab-fishing. It didn't get near as far as this particular thread.

You know, you really cannot put one over on a redhead Just a bit of a recommendation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-21-2008, 10:44 AM
 
Location: where you sip the tea of the breasts of the spinsters of Utica
8,307 posts, read 11,579,232 times
Reputation: 8020
If you like preparing food instead of buying a freezer meal, Wanderer, why not buy an old M1 Garand and restore it to better than new condition?

You can accurize those things to hit a quarter at 500 yards, and they're semiautomatic too.



Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-21-2008, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,852 posts, read 19,199,803 times
Reputation: 6455
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce 01 View Post
My many years of eating game led me to the conclusion that most of it stinks.
Then you are either shooting the wrong game, in the wrong area, or spoiled the meat while preparing the game.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce 01 View Post
I've never had pheasant that even came close to being as good as a commercial meat chicken.
I've had pheasant that was better than chicken.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce 01 View Post
I've never had squirrel that was better than being barely edible.
You burn more calories skinning the squirrel than you get from the meat. I stopped shooting squirrels when I was 11 years old.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce 01 View Post
Most venison (white-tail) I've had was barely edible. One exception was a young fawn that maybe wasn't even completely weaned yet. The meat looked like veal, and even at that, was not better than most beef.
Again, you are either hunting in the wrong area, or you aren't field-dressing your game properly. The flavor of game meat is directly related to what the critter eats. In southern California, for example, were there is a lot of sage, the deer eat the sage and then, not surprisingly, taste like sage. Also, if you can spoil the meat if you don't field-dress the game properly. I've seen a lot of good meat wasted in this way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce 01 View Post
The only way to make any of this stuff "good" is to parboil it (if old) and smother it with onions, garlic, pepper, and various other strong spices to cover up the real taste. And even with parboiling some things remain tough.

I like the taste of beef steak, and have no interest in "covering up" the true flavor with anything other than salt and pepper. With this frame of mind, nothing you ever do to venison will make it good unless you cover up the actual taste. I've taken fresh venison steaks and grilled them just like I would a beef steak, but they tasted lousy.
Different cuts of meat need to be prepared differently. Or do you also "parboil" porterhouses and fillet mignon? Perhaps it isn't the game that is rank, but rather the cook.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce 01 View Post
Now a lot of this can be attributed to how they were killed as people above mentioned. I raised hogs for years and butchered them myself, and the most important thing is for them to be calm and unexcited when killed, and they must be killed and bled quickly. This rarely happens with wild game.

I hear all the stories of the "Great White Hunters" around here claiming how good this or that tastes. But ALL the recipes involve smothering the meat with onions, garlic, and strong spices.
This simply is not true. Just because you can't cook doesn't mean there is a problem with the ingredients.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce 01 View Post
There is some satisfaction of hunting and processing it yourself into a freezer full of fresh, nutritious meat. But I see a lot of "hunters" spending untold amounts of money on guns, scopes, boots, special clothing, 4 wheelers, yadda yadda, the list is endless. In the end, IMO, they end up with a bunch of meat that tastes lousy but costs some multiple of what you can buy at the grocery store, which tastes good.
If that is your experience, then obviously you shouldn't go hunting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce 01 View Post
As for buffalo, (American Bison) my best friend has been raising them for 35 years. They live on grass pasture and hay in the winter. The meat is at least as good as any beef. The bulls do tend to be on the lean side. But a porterhouse, T-bone, or any other good cut from the cows will rival any beef out there. A lot of other people must think so also, because the prices are at least 50% higher than beef.
The porterhouse and t-bone cuts from caribou and moose are just as tasty as beef or buffalo, and do not require being "parboiled" or smothered in spices, onions, or other ingredients to hide its flavor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce 01 View Post
Oh well, this is just my life's experiences and how they have made me who I am. I'm sure plenty of people would disagree, and that's fine.
There is more skill involved in hunting than merely shooting some critter. A good hunter will know what his game eats in a given area, so they will know how it will taste before they even shoot. A good hunter will know how to field-dress game meat without spoiling it. A good hunter will know how to prepare and cook their game meat.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Alaska
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top