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Old 01-13-2009, 02:55 PM
 
16,031 posts, read 15,844,003 times
Reputation: 7046

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And this pertains to the topic how Met? Stop trying to stir up stuff and move on to the politics thread where you can have your way with everyone there.
There's a "politics" thread here?

Lighten up; it wasn't intended to make you get your tail in a knot.
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Old 01-13-2009, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Alaska
1,007 posts, read 1,411,868 times
Reputation: 263
Fine, I just figured it was you pulling your usual.
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Old 01-13-2009, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Hangin' with the bears.
3,811 posts, read 2,945,405 times
Reputation: 913
Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamChasers8 View Post
And this pertains to the topic how Met? Stop trying to stir up stuff and move on to the politics thread where you can have your way with everyone there.
Unlike you, who twists what I say to make you look like the almighty smartest dog nutritionists on the forum.

I was complimenting pugluver for doing the right thing and for not taking at face value what a blogger, a testimonial or chat room decides is the right thing to do. If you'd read my posts instead of ASSuming what I posted, you'd see, that NO WHERE DO I SAY DON'T DO IT. I say if you're going to do it do it responsibily. But you go ahead and twist this post to meet your needs, too. Politics thread? The way you manipulate my posts tells me you'd be great there!
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Old 01-13-2009, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Alaska
1,007 posts, read 1,411,868 times
Reputation: 263
Siouxcia, I have not manipulated your post in any way, and after re-reading it again, it still sounded like a generic statement and not directed at Pugluvr, cautioning everyone to check with vets before doing anything. My point was most vets will not back it up cause it's bad for their business. She was lucky to have found a vet who cared more about her animals and not their checkbook.
I have never claimed to be an expert, only going on my personal and past professional experiences. Not to mention the many other success stories out there.
Besides the thread has lost it's point, go with it where ever you like.
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Old 01-13-2009, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Alaska
5,154 posts, read 9,341,391 times
Reputation: 3496
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
I have no doubt that a raw diet is more beneficial to a dogs health than kibble. The question isn't a matter of benefit to the dog, but a matter of cost to the owner. It costs approximately $5/pound to feed a dog a raw diet, and they recommend feeding your dog between 2% and 3% of their body weight. So for my 120 pound mastiff puppy that works out to about 3 pounds of raw diet every day. At $5/pound, that is $15/day, or $456.25/month, or $1,825/year (excluding leap years). And that is just one dog.

Some people have no problem spending tens of thousands of dollars on their pets. I do. A raw diet would increase my costs by more than a factor of four. I already feed my dogs a top quality kibble with no grains, fillers, or chemicals and that isn't cheap either. I don't even spend $15/day on my own food, so I'm sure as hell not going to spend more on my dog's food. Those who spend more for their pet's food than their own food have their priorities completely out of whack, in my opinion.
I make a homemade dog food recipe and I figure the cost ranges between $2.00 to $2.50 per day for 2 dogs. I currently cook the meat, brown rice and pinto beans and leave the veggies uncooked. I thinking of trying raw meat in the recipe to see how they like it, at some future point. What keeps the cost down is using beans as part of the protein percentage which ranges from 50-66% of the weight.

We usually make a month's worth of food, bagging daily meals and freezing the majority. The only pain is it takes a good part of one day to make it. So you can make your own for a little more than dry kibble.
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Old 01-13-2009, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Alaska
1,007 posts, read 1,411,868 times
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What a great and cost effective thing to do. I would encourage you to try the raw in time, they will get more out of it nutritionally.
I read on several different websites about beans and dogs. Just keep in mind that there are several things that are perfectly normal for us but are actually poisonous to our dogs, one is beans. Not sure if pinto beans are or just beans in general. If yours aren't having any issues than I would think they would be fine, thought you might want to know about it anyway.
Poisoning

The next major breakdown-causing aspect of commercial dry diets is their inclusion of ingredients that contain saponins and phaseolins. They are poisons and can be fatal. Ingredients that contain saponins are: beet pulp, sorghum, soybeans, potatoes, alfalfa, tomato pomace, peas, beans, oats, garlic, and yucca.

http://therobertabadydogfoodcoltd.com/how_to_choose.htm
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Old 01-13-2009, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Hangin' with the bears.
3,811 posts, read 2,945,405 times
Reputation: 913
Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamChasers8 View Post
Siouxcia, I have not manipulated your post in any way, and after re-reading it again, it still sounded like a generic statement and not directed at Pugluvr, cautioning everyone to check with vets before doing anything. My point was most vets will not back it up cause it's bad for their business. She was lucky to have found a vet who cared more about her animals and not their checkbook.
I have never claimed to be an expert, only going on my personal and past professional experiences. Not to mention the many other success stories out there.
Besides the thread has lost it's point, go with it where ever you like.
Quote:
She just stated that she has done this along with her Vet and has been quite sucessful for 2 years...what more do you want her to do? It seems as though you just refuse to believe that people can actually be doing something good for their animals that you don't support.
You need to make up your mind. Either I directed my post to her or it was a generic post.

When children are old enough to eat solid food for the first time, do people load that plate up with nachos and hot sauce, fried chicken, swedish meat balls, moose, salmon, seal, etc. Usually not. Responsibl parents follow the guidelines their pediatrician AND nutrition experts recommend and proceed slowly adding new foods to their childrens' diets. Why do you have such a problem with doing the same for a dog?

Just because you are adament about what you believe does not make my opinion wrong. If you looked beyond your obsession with being 100% right, you'd see we both want what's best for our animals.
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Old 01-13-2009, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Alaska
1,007 posts, read 1,411,868 times
Reputation: 263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Siouxcia View Post
When children are old enough to eat solid food for the first time, do people load that plate up with nachos and hot sauce, fried chicken, swedish meat balls, moose, salmon, seal, etc. Usually not. Responsibl parents follow the guidelines their pediatrician AND nutrition experts recommend and proceed slowly adding new foods to their childrens' diets. Why do you have such a problem with doing the same for a dog?
I agree 100% with you there. I think people should proceed responsibly and start off slow. I have stated that in my previous post. Most Vets are no experts on animal nutrition, I know it doesn't sound accurate but it's true, unless they have taken it upon themselves to research further.
But yes Siou, I agree that people should start off slow, one protein at a time.
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Old 01-13-2009, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,862 posts, read 11,550,256 times
Reputation: 6292
Quote:
Originally Posted by akck View Post
I make a homemade dog food recipe and I figure the cost ranges between $2.00 to $2.50 per day for 2 dogs. I currently cook the meat, brown rice and pinto beans and leave the veggies uncooked. I thinking of trying raw meat in the recipe to see how they like it, at some future point. What keeps the cost down is using beans as part of the protein percentage which ranges from 50-66% of the weight.

We usually make a month's worth of food, bagging daily meals and freezing the majority. The only pain is it takes a good part of one day to make it. So you can make your own for a little more than dry kibble.
A couple dollars per day is much more reasonable, but the diet you serve your dogs and the raw diet that is being sold are not the same. For one thing, dogs can't digest rice or beans like humans, therefore they do not get the same nutritional value has humans. So it is a mistake to assume they are getting the proper amount of protein if you are basing your calculations using beans or other vegetables. Dogs get the vast majority of their protein from meat, not from grains, beans, rice, or other "fillers."
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Old 01-13-2009, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Maple Lake, MN
8,673 posts, read 9,887,290 times
Reputation: 10154
Quote:
Originally Posted by akck View Post
I make a homemade dog food recipe and I figure the cost ranges between $2.00 to $2.50 per day for 2 dogs. I currently cook the meat, brown rice and pinto beans and leave the veggies uncooked. I thinking of trying raw meat in the recipe to see how they like it, at some future point. What keeps the cost down is using beans as part of the protein percentage which ranges from 50-66% of the weight.

We usually make a month's worth of food, bagging daily meals and freezing the majority. The only pain is it takes a good part of one day to make it. So you can make your own for a little more than dry kibble.
I'm with you...The past few weeks I have been doing the same varying the meat with rice and veggies, sometimes adding eggs, oil, etc. Am going to add cottage cheese to the mix now, as I read they need the calcium, (some add bone meal or ground tums). When we got salmon last summer I cook down what was left from filleting, bones, skin, etc., and froze the pickings along with the broth to add when cooking the rice. I feed them (Cockers) twice a day now rather than having the kibble out all day long, and they are much calmer than previous also, except if I go to the stove they all line up thinking they get something. I put out a bowl of commercial food the other day, and they stuck their noses up at itThey also get homemade dog treats for crunch and occasional cooked, hard bone to gnaw on...
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