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Old 05-17-2009, 02:35 AM
 
Location: Interior alaska
6,272 posts, read 7,377,627 times
Reputation: 3173
Quote:
Originally Posted by YankeesGiantsRangersNYK View Post
Just wondering...
Other than anyone living on Little Diomede Island, which is U.S./Alaska across from Big Diomede Island, which is Russia...nobody.

That was a "skit" on Saturday Night Live, and not something said by anyone in Alaska, including Governor Palin.

Funny how some people can't tell the difference between "As seen on TV" and real life.

 
Old 05-17-2009, 02:38 AM
 
Location: Interior alaska
6,272 posts, read 7,377,627 times
Reputation: 3173
Quote:
Originally Posted by JavaPhil View Post
Seriously, I think you can see it from Attu (Kamchatka) and from Little Diomede. Maybe at one of the bluffs north of Norton Sound.

Nah... The only thing you can see from Attu is the end of the earth...

Coast Guard has a Loran Station there with about thirty guys at the one time I spent about three days there helping repair a generator.
 
Old 05-17-2009, 02:51 AM
 
Location: Barrow, Alaska
3,538 posts, read 4,161,098 times
Reputation: 1787
Quote:
Originally Posted by starlite9 View Post
Other than anyone living on Little Diomede Island, which is U.S./Alaska across from Big Diomede Island, which is Russia...nobody.
Actually, from the Alaska mainland at the Bering Straits (e.g., from Wales, from the radar site on top of Cape Mountain, or even at Tin City on the south side) it is possible to see mainland Russia on any clear day.

Incidentally, there are probably no descendants in Alaska today of any Russians who were here prior to 1867. Just to begin with there were never more than 600-700 Russians in Alaska at any one time when they owned it. But even more to the point they all left immediately after Alaska was transfered to the US simply because the US Army literally confiscated everything they owned in an effort to drive them all out. Only about a dozen stayed more than a month or so. (See "History of Alaska", Bancroft.)

All of the Russians in Alaska today have migrated here in the past several decades, and most of them had left Russian long before they came to Alaska. They are "Old Believers".
 
Old 05-17-2009, 03:10 AM
 
Location: Maple Lake, MN
8,671 posts, read 9,359,496 times
Reputation: 10138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Floyd_Davidson View Post
Actually, from the Alaska mainland at the Bering Straits (e.g., from Wales, from the radar site on top of Cape Mountain, or even at Tin City on the south side) it is possible to see mainland Russia on any clear day.

Incidentally, there are probably no descendants in Alaska today of any Russians who were here prior to 1867. Just to begin with there were never more than 600-700 Russians in Alaska at any one time when they owned it. But even more to the point they all left immediately after Alaska was transfered to the US simply because the US Army literally confiscated everything they owned in an effort to drive them all out. Only about a dozen stayed more than a month or so. (See "History of Alaska", Bancroft.)

All of the Russians in Alaska today have migrated here in the past several decades, and most of them had left Russian long before they came to Alaska. They are "Old Believers".
OK...Old Believers like in Homer where fire has been going on....you are saying all Russian Villages, especially on the peninsula and their people came here after statehood? and formed these villages that are how old? we have landmark churches that are how old....
 
Old 05-17-2009, 05:07 AM
 
Location: Barrow, Alaska
3,538 posts, read 4,161,098 times
Reputation: 1787
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grannysroost View Post
OK...Old Believers like in Homer where fire has been going on....you are saying all Russian Villages, especially on the peninsula and their people came here after statehood? and formed these villages that are how old? we have landmark churches that are how old....
There are many old Russian Orthodox churches in Alaska that date back to the 1800's. A few of them even date to before the 1867 purchase. But generally they were not there for Russians. The Tzar sent the Church to Alaska (in 1794) to protect the Native people from Russian merchants who had a history of abusing them. (Note that in 1799 the Russian-American Company was given sole authority to trade in Alaska, and that too was partially done to curb the poor treatment of Natives by merchants.)

A Russian census in 1810 placed a total of 491 Russians in Alaska. In 1833 there were 731 Russians in Alaska. In 1867 there were a total of 782 Russians in Alaska, spread over 43 locations, and there were 9 Russian Orthodox Churches and 35 Chapels in operation. By 1870 only 4 were still functioning. But then Alaska became a separate Diocese for the Orthodox Church, and it began to grow! (Bancroft, much to the annoyance of modern Orthodox scholars such as Father Michael Oleksa, basically said that the Church was a failure during the Russian period.) By 1895 there were 14 churches with 15,000 members.

An example that demonstrates the point is the church in Juneau, which is the oldest continuously functioning Russian Orthodox church in Alaska. It was built in 1894. There were no Russians in Juneau prior to 1867.

It is interesting to note that the Russian military and the Russian missionaries both treated Alaska's Native peoples fairly well, and actually made efforts to curb abuses by other Russians. That is distinctly opposed to the situation once the US took possession of Alaska and the abuse of Natives became primarily the domain of the government and the missionaries.

The Russian "Old Believers" communities on the Kenai began in 1968. They came to Alaska from Oregon (via China and South America).
 
Old 05-17-2009, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Too far from Alaska
1,435 posts, read 1,557,982 times
Reputation: 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by huf123 View Post
The Russians are all here shopping at WalMart
I've noticed that too. Since 6-7 years ago I started hearing Russian spoken in stores. And since I used to be rather fluent in it long time ago, it really stood out from all the English and Spanish chatter one normally hears. Turnes out those are Jews from Russia who settled in Israel. And after many of those "illegal" settlements were closed down, with the money they were compensated for leaving, they showed up in US (no visa needed). So, yeah: THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING! THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING!
 
Old 05-17-2009, 09:48 AM
 
Location: NC, USA
7,089 posts, read 7,796,492 times
Reputation: 3808
AW, C'mon, don't let these guys shine you on!!! Russia Watching is almost the Alaska State pasttime. Why else do you think they have those large hot-air balloons. Tethered off with, less than, a thousand feet of good rope, practically everyone in Alaska is capable "Russia viewing". The hard part is teaching the Moose to "Stay" They tie the balloons off to a specially made harness for the Moose, it normally takes two trained Moose to adequately anchor one of the balloons, the training is essential, otherwise they roam around and get the lines tangled in the giant redwoods.
 
Old 05-17-2009, 06:13 PM
 
3,767 posts, read 3,768,343 times
Reputation: 3831
Sarah Palin did not say she could see Russia from her house. This is what she did say about Russia:

Katie Couric: You've cited Alaska's proximity to Russia as part of your foreign policy experience. What did you mean by that?

Sarah Palin: That Alaska has a very narrow maritime border between a foreign country, Russia, and, on our other side, the land-boundry that we have with Canada. It's funny that a comment like that was kinda made to car … I don't know, you know … reporters.

Couric: Mocked?

Palin: Yeah, mocked, I guess that's the word, yeah.

Couric: Well, explain to me why that enhances your foreign-policy credentials.

Palin: Well, it certainly does, because our, our next-door neighbors are foreign countries, there in the state that I am the executive of. And there…

Couric: Have you ever been involved in any negotiations, for example, with the Russians?

Palin: We have trade missions back and forth, we do. It's very important when you consider even national-security issues with Russia. As Putin rears his head and comes into the air space of the United States of America, where do they go? It's Alaska. It's just right over the border. It is from Alaska that we send those out to make sure that an eye is being kept on this very powerful nation, Russia, because they are right next to, they are right next to our state.
 
Old 05-17-2009, 06:45 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,272 posts, read 1,273,341 times
Reputation: 705
Actually what was being parodied was Palin's interview with Charles Gibson on ABC Evening News.

"GIBSON: What insight into Russian actions, particularly in the last couple of weeks, does the proximity of the state give you?

PALIN: They're our next door neighbors and you can actually see Russia from land here in Alaska, from an island in Alaska.

GIBSON: What insight does that give you into what they're doing in Georgia?

PALIN: Well, I'm giving you that perspective of how small our world is and how important it is that we work with our allies to keep good relation with all of these countries, especially Russia. We will not repeat a Cold War. We must have good relationship with our allies, pressuring, also, helping us to remind Russia that it's in their benefit, also, a mutually beneficial relationship for us all to be getting along. "

Right after this interview Tina Fey took the phrase "you can actually see Russia from land here in Alaska" and turned it into the great comic moment it was.
Though I myself favored Amy Poehlers Palin rap bit.
 
Old 05-17-2009, 06:47 PM
 
15,558 posts, read 14,656,861 times
Reputation: 6543
I get such a headache reading Palin's interviews.
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