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Old 05-08-2009, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Too far from Alaska
1,435 posts, read 2,317,646 times
Reputation: 271

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
The only places where you can find solitude on a river is to find one where there are no fish.
That is sad, really.
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Old 05-08-2009, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,850 posts, read 19,592,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnPF View Post
That is sad, really.
It is indeed. If you are willing to get up really early in order to be on the river fishing by 5:00AM, you may find some solitude for a couple hours. Otherwise, you need to plan for a crowd. For example, when Kings open on the Susitna/Montana confluence it always begins on a weekend, so you have to make sure you are on bank ready to fish by 8:00PM Friday, or you will find no room by midnight. Last year there were more than two hundred people lining about 500 yards of the west bank when King season opened.
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Old 05-08-2009, 09:37 PM
 
65 posts, read 236,782 times
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That is sad. I guess when I mean solitude, I don't want some person right next to me. Can't I have 20 plus feet on each side. I have never seen a river with no fish! A healthy habitat needs some form of fish in the waterway. I guess it is ocean fishing, better not sell the boat.
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Old 05-08-2009, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,850 posts, read 19,592,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomcat6369 View Post
That is sad. I guess when I mean solitude, I don't want some person right next to me. Can't I have 20 plus feet on each side. I have never seen a river with no fish! A healthy habitat needs some form of fish in the waterway. I guess it is ocean fishing, better not sell the boat.
It really depends on the river and the tides. Salmon only start their journey up river during high tides. If you are close to the ocean, the best time to fish would be a couple hours just before and just after high tide. The further away from the ocean, the harder it is to predict the time.

In the smaller inland rivers and tributaries 30 to 50 feet or more between people fishing is not uncommon. Most people try to be courteous and give you as much room as possible. After all, they want the same thing.
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Old 05-08-2009, 10:03 PM
 
65 posts, read 236,782 times
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that sounds much better, I can live with that. Seen that down on the Cowlitz River.
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Old 05-08-2009, 10:15 PM
 
Location: Too far from Alaska
1,435 posts, read 2,317,646 times
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Quote:
In the smaller inland rivers and tributaries 30 to 50 feet or more between people fishing is not uncommon. Most people try to be courteous and give you as much room as possible. After all, they want the same thing.
That is not the mental picture I have from the lower 48. I used to have friends who would fish for salmon in Kenosha Wisconsin, if I remember correctly. And when the fish would run, there were no free spots left where there was public access. And idiots running up and down the small river thru a golf course where they could not come up on the bank. Mayhem. That's why I never went myself.
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Old 05-08-2009, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,850 posts, read 19,592,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnPF View Post
That is not the mental picture I have from the lower 48. I used to have friends who would fish for salmon in Kenosha Wisconsin, if I remember correctly. And when the fish would run, there were no free spots left where there was public access. And idiots running up and down the small river thru a golf course where they could not come up on the bank. Mayhem. That's why I never went myself.
Maybe those fishing in Alaska tend to be more courteous because everyone is armed for bear. Remember to always combat fish in groups of two, so one can cover while the other casts.
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Old 05-08-2009, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Too far from Alaska
1,435 posts, read 2,317,646 times
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Unfortunately I live in one of like 3 states that do not allow any form of concealed carry. Or open carry :P Unlikely to change any time soon, though statistics show gun ownership, especially mandatory gun ownership lowers crime rates significantly.
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Old 05-08-2009, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,850 posts, read 19,592,282 times
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The best advice I can give anyone new to fishing in Alaska is to get the current Sport Fishing Regulations and a copy of the tides for the area you want to fish and study them carefully.

King season starts first in late May, but also is very short ending in July. The opening for Reds and Silvers is about one month after Kings season opens, late June. Reds are my personal favorite. They are the smallest of the 5 species of salmon, but I think they taste the best. Red runs will continue through July and into August. Several different runs of Silvers start in June and continue running into September. Silvers range between 8 and 12 pounds and are the most common of the 5 species of salmon. I consider Silvers to be the second best tasting. Kings are also very tasty, and they are fun to catch because they are so big. But you can have just as much fun with a Red if you use an ultralight rod and 4 pound test.
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Old 05-08-2009, 11:45 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,171 posts, read 27,428,664 times
Reputation: 11838
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
Side arms are used only as a backup weapon here. You would have to be very desperate indeed to pull a .44 Mag. or even a .50 cal. revolver or pistol on a brown bear. Don't forget to save the last round for yourself!

I typically carry a Mossberg Model 500 12-gauge, with a rifled barrel and an extended tube magazine as my primary camp gun, and I wear a Ruger .44 Mag Super Redhawk when I'm standing in the river fishing. Carrying a shotgun while fishing really messes with my casting accuracy.
My backup gun at close range is a Freedom Arms 7-1/2" .454 Casull with express sights, loaded with 340-grain (300...something) Buffalo hard cast bullets. When I am not carrying my rifle, then the primary gun for bear defense at close range is a Mossberg 500A shotgun with an 18-1/2" barrel and stock, loaded with slugs. This is a very fast-pointing shotgun because of the short barrel.
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