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Old 05-27-2009, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Maple Lake, MN
8,672 posts, read 9,753,278 times
Reputation: 10149
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissingAll4Seasons View Post
The biggest mental shift for me everytime I leave the city to go to Alaska is to slow down... don't walk so fast, don't drive so fast, don't think so fast, don't talk so fast. We're so conditioned by the L48 cities to hurry through our days and lives that we rarely enjoy them... that's just not the case in Alaska. So my advice is "Don't rush".
Good advice for a lot of us...it is hard to slow down sometimes
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Old 05-27-2009, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Barrow, Alaska
3,538 posts, read 4,359,748 times
Reputation: 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nephler View Post
Ok, I just went back and reread Floyd's first post. In the past that may have may have been true, but this is now, and times have changed. It may have been the whites that brought the eye contact in, but as far as I have ever heard, most native have always had eye contact as a form of respect.
I have no idea if "most native have always"... but I'll tell you right now that many of today's Alaska Native people will instantly notice whether you do one or the other, and the assumption is that your level of understanding is associated directly with which you do.

The same goes for shaking hands! Most Americans think that a "firm grip" indicates something of value. Most of Alaska's Native cultures find that simply an obnoxious characteristic of American culture. And to a lesser degree the same is indicated by a handshake that amounts to more than "up / down/ release" (and with a "grip" about the way you'd shake hands with your 95 year old grandmother).

Personally I find it less than amusing when someone shakes my hand with any amount of pressure or any shake-shake-shake-shake. (And once upon a time, years ago, I knew a guy who insisted on doing just that... so I grabbed his wrist in pushed his hand forward and asked him how he like it? He was on his knees begging me to let him go. Try it.)
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Old 05-27-2009, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Bliss Township, Michigan
6,421 posts, read 7,421,931 times
Reputation: 6489
Yes, I couldn't agree more. Something, I don't know what, just something here has given me that feeling that has allowed me to slow down. Even stressed, I feel more soothed then I did. I just don't know what it is, but I like it.

Last edited by Nephler; 05-27-2009 at 11:07 PM.. Reason: This was for Granny's and Season's post. :)
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Old 05-27-2009, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Too far from Alaska
1,435 posts, read 1,623,663 times
Reputation: 268
I for one dislike people who greet me with a slippery handshake. You know, like fingers only instead a whole hand. Or a whole hand, but almost no grip at all.
Maybe part of culture one grows up in, but above put me on guard as to the intentions of such person.
I used to work for a man who hired people based on first seconds of an interview. Handshake, eye contact, face/body expression.
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Old 05-28-2009, 02:49 AM
 
3,774 posts, read 7,483,421 times
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Floyd, sometimes it's okay to let what might be a broad generality slide rather than create a new argument. Most of what you have to say seems to be bent on causing others to look bad. I could be wrong. But that is the impression I've been getting.

I don't like confrontation in a forum where I hang out to have fun and exchange views. I am more than willing to admit my mistakes, of which there are many. I am willing to apologize if my impression is wrong. But it took a major act of will to write this post, because my faults are so many, and it would take days to list them all. Having someone write a post to me that may point out one of these failures would also be painful. My apologies if I am wrong.
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Old 05-28-2009, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Barrow, Alaska
3,538 posts, read 4,359,748 times
Reputation: 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by JavaPhil View Post
Floyd, sometimes it's okay to let what might be a broad generality slide rather than create a new argument. Most of what you have to say seems to be bent on causing others to look bad. I could be wrong. But that is the impression I've been getting.

I don't like confrontation in a forum where I hang out to have fun and exchange views. I am more than willing to admit my mistakes, of which there are many. I am willing to apologize if my impression is wrong. But it took a major act of will to write this post, because my faults are so many, and it would take days to list them all. Having someone write a post to me that may point out one of these failures would also be painful. My apologies if I am wrong.
Your apologies are accepted. I have no idea why anyone would write a post like the one you just did, falsely accusing another person of precisely what you are doing. It's interesting to consider what might trigger such action, eh?

For myself, I believe we should all be very cognizant of what C-D Forum is supposed to be all about, which is to provide accurate information about places. I see no reason not to correct false information about Alaska, and I see no reason to post gratuitous insults about people.
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Old 05-28-2009, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Barrow, Alaska
3,538 posts, read 4,359,748 times
Reputation: 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnPF View Post
I for one dislike people who greet me with a slippery handshake. You know, like fingers only instead a whole hand. Or a whole hand, but almost no grip at all.
Maybe part of culture one grows up in, but above put me on guard as to the intentions of such person.
In most of bush Alaska that type of handshake is considered a sign of respect, and the firm hand grip etc is self important arrogance.

Consider this, which way would you shake the hand of a 95 year old elder? Gently? Out of respect, perhaps...

Treating everyone with that same respect is indeed cultural.
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Old 05-28-2009, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Wasilla
1,081 posts, read 1,427,047 times
Reputation: 659
Okay...... point being - keep an open mind to other cultures and know that their ways might not be your ways.

I think this horse is dead.
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Old 05-28-2009, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Naptowne, Alaska
14,872 posts, read 24,733,580 times
Reputation: 13040
And other cultures should be aware that your ways may not be their ways. If they can't handle a handshake...to heck with them. I usually don't associate with arrogant drama queens anyway...

OP you just come up here and be yourself. I'm sure you'll be accepted for the good people you are. Something so unimportant as eye contact and handshakes will be the last thing you need to worry about trust me.
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Old 05-28-2009, 11:21 AM
 
Location: living on the mighty Columbia
1,829 posts, read 1,200,721 times
Reputation: 3715
I lived in Anchorage in the seventies, it was a culture change to be sure. I wasn't expecting the winter to be so dark, it really plays on peoples minds.

I loved the fact that we didn't have to get dressed up to go anywhere, lol, it is layed back and pretty friendly. I also was impressed with the kind of folk's who were living there at that time, they were almost all looking for some kind of oppertunity to change the paradigm of the lower 48.

Alaska is mostly made up of people from somewhere else, that said however, they don't always need reminding of those things that are different from life in Alaska, they came to experience the natural beauty of the place not to compare it to whatever they left.

All in all try to be your genuine self, no pretensions, this is the death of all things social in Alaska, don't forget, they too were tired of wherever they were living, they too were fed up with the "bigness" of lower 48 living, and they were most definitly fed up with the pretentious horse's ass people from the bling-land of which they left. I still remember some of those folk's I met up there in the seventies as being of a very unique minority of American's who really believed in those principles of live and let live, most of the old timers, say what they mean, and mean what they say.
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