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Old 06-02-2009, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Naptowne, Alaska
15,596 posts, read 34,586,242 times
Reputation: 14657

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And don't forget ND is much more humid...thus feels colder. Like it or not.
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Old 06-02-2009, 07:01 AM
 
Location: Bliss Township, Michigan
6,423 posts, read 11,088,263 times
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Old 06-02-2009, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Always dancing to a far off tune --- Fiddlefeet
123 posts, read 339,366 times
Reputation: 74
You guys have sure been having some fun while I've been gone. Obviously, Alaska is filled with people I'd like.

I will explore the job prospect and refer regularly to this thread as I mull it all over. Thank you very much for all the information.

workplace.alaska.gov.
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Old 06-03-2009, 04:09 AM
 
Location: Barrow, Alaska
3,539 posts, read 6,419,110 times
Reputation: 1828
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rance View Post
And don't forget ND is much more humid...thus feels colder. Like it or not.
That's an interesting observation.

The relative humidity in the winter is perhaps 5 percent higher in Fargo than in Barrow. But in the summer time things get different. In Barrow the City-Data charts show that afternoon relative humidity is only slightly lower than in the morning. And the morning is roughly the same relationship to Fargo as it is in the winter, just slightly lower in Barrow. But in Fargo the afternoon relative humidity in the summer drops down to less than 60% for the entire summer!

Regardless of that Fargo gets much more precipitation than Barrow. I'm not sure that actually means anything though, as while Barrow gets little rain it is "wet" virtually any time the temperature is above freezing (because there is no absorption of water into the frozen ground here).

Whatever, during the coldest part of the year Fargo has relative humidity that is about 75% and Barrow is about 68%. That wouldn't begin to make up for the huge difference in actual temperatures.
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Old 06-05-2009, 12:45 AM
 
5 posts, read 8,393 times
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I've visited Anchorage and the southern part of Alaska a lot, during the summer. It's a nice warm temperature, though my grandad has been snowed in a couple times during the winter.
Basically, if you're in southern Alaska, it's not going to be much worse than another city along that... longitude? (which one goes which way?)
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Old 06-05-2009, 02:00 AM
 
Location: Bethel, Alaska
21,358 posts, read 32,337,542 times
Reputation: 13697
Quote:
Originally Posted by Floyd_Davidson View Post
That's an interesting observation.

The relative humidity in the winter is perhaps 5 percent higher in Fargo than in Barrow. But in the summer time things get different. In Barrow the City-Data charts show that afternoon relative humidity is only slightly lower than in the morning. And the morning is roughly the same relationship to Fargo as it is in the winter, just slightly lower in Barrow. But in Fargo the afternoon relative humidity in the summer drops down to less than 60% for the entire summer!

Regardless of that Fargo gets much more precipitation than Barrow. I'm not sure that actually means anything though, as while Barrow gets little rain it is "wet" virtually any time the temperature is above freezing (because there is no absorption of water into the frozen ground here).

Whatever, during the coldest part of the year Fargo has relative humidity that is about 75% and Barrow is about 68%. That wouldn't begin to make up for the huge difference in actual temperatures.


Of course you know, it's all relative...
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Old 06-05-2009, 03:06 AM
 
Location: Seward, Alaska
2,739 posts, read 7,650,248 times
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Choose any town within 10-20 miles of the coast, from South-Eastern to (and including) the Kenai Peninsula, and you'll see substantially warmer winter temps than the rest of the state...

Closer to saltwater= warmer
Further inland= colder
Middle areas of state= colder than H3LL...


Bud
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Old 06-05-2009, 03:28 AM
 
Location: Barrow, Alaska
3,539 posts, read 6,419,110 times
Reputation: 1828
Quote:
Originally Posted by warptman View Post
Of course you know, it's all relative...
Think so huh?

Wait 'till that poor guy who wants to take a dip in the Ocean
gets here. I'll take a picture...

The humidity won't be relative at all.
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