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Old 06-18-2009, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Alaska- On the Bering Sea
251 posts, read 604,443 times
Reputation: 84

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Glitch, you are anything but dull and dreary.
Keep 'em coming my friend.


(Any recipe suggestions for ptarmigan?)
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Old 06-19-2009, 12:06 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,850 posts, read 19,595,646 times
Reputation: 6479
Quote:
Originally Posted by spleenificus View Post
Glitch, you are anything but dull and dreary.
Keep 'em coming my friend.


(Any recipe suggestions for ptarmigan?)
How about ptarmigan stuffed with wild rice, Shiitake mushrooms in a port sauce?

4 Ptarmigan, boned (see note below)

Stuffing
3 ounces of wild rice
1-1/2 cups of chicken stock
1 tablespoon of butter
4 ounces of foie gras, cut into cubes
1/2 cup of dried Shiitake mushrooms (1 cup if fresh), finely chopped
1 shallot, minced
1/2 cup of fresh herbs (parsley, chervil, basil), chopped
1 tablespoon cognac
fresh parsley and rosemary to garnish
salt and pepper to taste

Simmer the rice and mushrooms in the stock for 30-40 minutes, until tender, then set aside. Season the foie gras with salt and pepper and saute in a hot frying pan with the butter, herb mixture, and shallots until all the cubes are sealed on all sides. Add the foie gras, herb, and shallot mixture and cognac to the rice. Check the seasoning and let cool to room temperature.

Preheat oven to 400F

Season the inside of the ptarmigan with salt and pepper. Loosely fill with the rice stuffing and truss (they will expand in the oven). In a frying pan, add 2 tablespoons of butter and saute the trussed ptarmigan until they are brown on all sides.

Roast the stuffed ptarmigan at 400F for 15-20 minutes, basting occasionally. Serve with port sauce.

Port Sauce
2 shallots, minced
2 tablespoons of butter
4 roasted ptarmigan carcasses
1/4 cup of sherry vinegar
1 cup of port (Madeira is a good substitute)
3 cups of chicken stock
1 sprig of fresh thyme
salt and pepper to taste

Melt the butter in a saute pan, and sweat the minced shallots until they become translucent, approximately 2 minutes. Add the ptarmigan carcasses and vinegar, then boil using moderate heat until almost evaporated. Stir in the port and reduce by half. Add the stock and thyme and simmer for 20 minutes. Strain through cheese cloth and season to taste.

Deboning Ptarmigan
Believe it or not, it is not that difficult to debone a ptarmigan whole, if you know how. First, remove the wishbone, cut off the wings, and loosen the legs so the leg bones are no longer in the hip socket. Second, insert a small pairing knife (ptarmigan are not that big ) between the rib cage and the flesh and scrape all around to free the flesh from the carcass. Finally, when the carcass is free, pull it out with your fingers.

Be sure you keep the wishbone, wings, and carcasses for the port sauce above. Roast all the ptarmigan carcasses at 400F for 10 minutes before adding them to the port sauce.
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Old 06-19-2009, 12:15 AM
 
Location: Too far from Alaska
1,435 posts, read 2,317,962 times
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Can you get shallots or fresh thyme out in remote Alaska? Just asking, I have no idea. It is fairly easy to get here around Chicago, but not many stores have these...
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Old 06-19-2009, 12:46 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska
17,850 posts, read 19,595,646 times
Reputation: 6479
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnPF View Post
Can you get shallots or fresh thyme out in remote Alaska? Just asking, I have no idea. It is fairly easy to get here around Chicago, but not many stores have these...
Thyme is easy enough to grow, but shallots need to be started in greenhouses, like onions, tomatoes, and peppers. The growing season is too short otherwise.

Shallots are a cross between garlic and scallions (green onion), two of my favorites. Which is why I like shallots so much.
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Old 06-19-2009, 04:57 AM
 
Location: NC, USA
7,088 posts, read 12,700,204 times
Reputation: 3975
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitch View Post
I am with Rance. One of my favorites dishes is a salmon fillet, rolled and stuffed with a scallop and tarragon paste, sliced into medallions and served with a white butter sauce. As a side dish I like it with young fiddle-head ferns, steamed, and served with an hollandaise sauce.

Of course boned ptarmigan, stuffed with wild rice and shiitake mushrooms, braised, and served in a port reduction sauce is pretty tasty as well.

Or maybe a Caribou Wellington. A caribou roast topped with diced mushrooms and garlic, wrapped in puff pastry, and served with a bordalaise sauce makes for a fine meal.

I better stop now, I am making myself hungry.
Dang!!!! and I was thinking about just plain ole Deer Jerky. Of course I do make it myself.
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Old 06-19-2009, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,368,124 times
Reputation: 3349
Salmon raw with a little salt, shashimi style with a little wasabi & soy sauce, or smoked... but for some reason, I just can't handle it cooked (baked, steamed, broiled, or grilled).

Ptarmigan or grouse, stuffed with millet (or rice or stale bread), wild onion/chive/garlic, dandelion greens and it's own eggs (if you can find the nest!). Seared and then slow braised, served with berry reduction sauce (whichever edible ones you have handy will work).
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Old 06-19-2009, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Haines, AK
1,429 posts, read 2,929,379 times
Reputation: 423
Moose, and Deer are my two favorites.
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Old 06-19-2009, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Too far from Alaska
1,435 posts, read 2,317,962 times
Reputation: 271
I had a Russian friend here in US who used to work in Siberia. What they did is catch fish and let them freeze right out and than eat them bit by bit, just shaving very thin slivers from the body.
How's that for subsistence food?
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Old 06-19-2009, 11:52 PM
 
Location: Alaska- On the Bering Sea
251 posts, read 604,443 times
Reputation: 84
John,

Frozen fish- as the Yup'ik call it- is still eaten in much the same way.
A bit of seal oil or soy sauce as a dip.
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Old 06-19-2009, 11:53 PM
 
Location: Bethel, Alaska
21,358 posts, read 32,308,923 times
Reputation: 13696
Qumlanaq-frozen fish in Yup'ik.
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