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Old 07-08-2009, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Naptowne, Alaska
15,018 posts, read 25,399,783 times
Reputation: 13292

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I prefer to wait until after the first frost to pick lowbush crans. They get a nice color and flavor to them.
And I have yet to see any salmon berries on my side of the inlet. Lot's on the westside. They may be down around Homer or Seward tho.
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Old 07-08-2009, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Alaska and Texas
202 posts, read 525,851 times
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Default seldovia

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbayfarm View Post
Wow, thank you all for leaving so many replies! I'm getting excited about berry picking season! I'll just have to do more driving around and search for some spots! My kids love the little 'adventure'!
Salmonberries like mild winters so you'll find them in coastal areas. I don't know if they're any in Homer but there's lots in Seldovia. They ripen in the summer and are done and gone by frost. I think it's the same with the blueberry/huckleberry. Every year I swear I'm going to skiff over to Seldovia to pick berries but never seem to get there.
As an aside, I went to a presentation in Kenai that compared the antioxidant levels of berries. Alaskan blueberries were way higher than store bought, but eclispsing all of them by a wide margin was the lingonberry, or what some call lowbush cranberry. They are good to pick after the first frost. Rhubarb juice also blew away cranberry juice in healthy nutrients.
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Old 07-08-2009, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Naptowne, Alaska
15,018 posts, read 25,399,783 times
Reputation: 13292
I recently discovered highbush blueberries near Sterling. I'd never seen them before. Just the low bush. These have immense flavor much like the mountain blueberries but are bigger in size. And not the colorless big berries I've picked down in Seward. These are purple inside and out.

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Old 07-19-2009, 12:40 PM
 
2,255 posts, read 3,570,011 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rance View Post
Whats a cloudberry? Timwe for google...

I've seen them but not in abundance. I believe it was on the west side of Cook Inlet. Are they the same as salmon berries? The pictures in google looked like low bush. The salmon berries I saw on the west side had quite tall bushes.
You've got to be kidding!

You love Sweden and you don't know what a Cloud Berry is ???

Okay Okay, here's your typical Salmon Berry



And here are some Cloud Berries:

http://www.finnmetal.net/Photos/cloudberry.jpg (broken link)http://www.deplicque.net/articles/article_img/cloudberries_inhands.jpg (broken link)

Here's a quick link to the Cloud Berry and it's cultivation or foraging in Scandinavia!

Cloudberry - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 07-19-2009, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Naptowne, Alaska
15,018 posts, read 25,399,783 times
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I haven't seen those cloud berries in Sweden.

I have seen one or two on the peninsula. But just one or two.
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Old 07-03-2010, 12:45 AM
 
2 posts, read 7,991 times
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Default just to let ya know

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rance View Post
I recently discovered highbush blueberries near Sterling. I'd never seen them before. Just the low bush. These have immense flavor much like the mountain blueberries but are bigger in size. And not the colorless big berries I've picked down in Seward. These are purple inside and out.

Those berries photographed are actually not blueberries. They are serviceberries or saskatoons (canadian word). They are actually related to apples as far as i know. Populations in alaska are fairly sporatic, so congrats for finding a patch.
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Old 07-06-2010, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Deltana, AK
745 posts, read 840,302 times
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Here on the north side of the Alaska Range, cloudberries grow in shrubby tussock tundra, sometimes along with stunted black spruce. So, the treeline areas roughly around Skilak Lake and Mystery Hills would be my best guess for the Kenai Peninsula, though I've never looked for them there. Wait for the mosquitoes to die, bring muck boots, and don't plan to move fast in shrubby tussock tundra... If nothing else, there should be LOTS of blueberries and highbush cranberries in those same areas.
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