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Old 04-24-2007, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Elizabethton, TN
5,892 posts, read 2,408,215 times
Reputation: 1872

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MAINEr View Post
northcountrygirl,

I wanted to move to Montana and hubby to Alaska (which I have no problem with). The friendliness of the people here over the MT forum won me over. They (MT) are against new people moving to the state in a big way
I can relate to that MAINEr. When we lived in South Florida, I saw bumperstickers that said "Welcome To Florida. Now Please Leave."
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Old 04-24-2007, 11:52 PM
 
Location: Naptowne, Alaska
15,009 posts, read 25,351,109 times
Reputation: 13279
Sorry I've been traveling home all day. Yes we've had some great northern lights this winter. Not alot of reds I've seen but still brilliant. We're getting some pretty good activity right now...but it's real cloudy in the south central area.

northcountrygirl thanks for the compliment! For the most part your average Alaskan is a good hearted down to earth individual. Will lend a helping hand at the drop of a hat. We've got our good as well as the bad...like anywhere. But really it's a particular breed that thrives here...and most are decent folks. Please feel free to stop in any time. I can only hope you get to visit some day.
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Old 04-25-2007, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
222 posts, read 772,707 times
Reputation: 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by northcountrygirl View Post
We used to see the Northern Lights here just about every winter but now I can't remember the last time I got to enjoy them. Has there been any change to the lights in Alaska.
Global Warming...LOL!!!
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Old 04-25-2007, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
222 posts, read 772,707 times
Reputation: 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by northcountrygirl View Post
Is it something in the water or what
I think it's the heat, it may be a dry heat but it still fries brain cells...LOL!!!
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Old 04-25-2007, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Another Day Closer
13,905 posts, read 1,971,306 times
Reputation: 3441
Hi everybody! I really appreciate the warm welcom! Thanks for letting me visit. I think you're right Las Vegan Cajun, it must be the heat. MAINEr, our bumper says "Welcome to Senic New Hampshire, Now Go To Hell Home". Nobody ever listens though. I'm sorry about the "Lights Out" comment. I kept coming over and knocking but nobody would open the door. It dawned on me later that we're probably looking at a big time difference here. Anyway thanks again for letting me in.
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Old 04-25-2007, 11:13 AM
 
43 posts, read 186,133 times
Reputation: 21
I must admit that the people in this part of the site are the friendliest. They are kind a helpful and hope to some day meet all of them

Wan2Batraveler
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Old 04-25-2007, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Haines, AK
1,123 posts, read 3,061,250 times
Reputation: 650
Default northern lights

If you're hoping to see the northern lights, keep in mind that their intensity is dependent on how active the sun is. Lots of spots and coronal mass ejections means lots of charged particles interacting with the earths magnetic fields to make the auroras. The sunspots vary with the suns 11-year-long cycle, near the "solar max" the auroras are intense and frequent, near the low of the cycle the aurora is quieter and infrequent.

When we were living in Eagle River about three years ago we caught the tail end of a big solar storm while driving in to Anchorage for work, what a show! The northern lights were so bright that you could even see them over the glow from the streetlights along the highway, which is phenomenal. The best time to see the aurora is typically in the winter, when the skys are clear and its so cold that you can hardly stand to be outside, but you can occasionally see them in summertime too despite the long daylight hours and the lack of total darkness.

Our house looked towards Anchorage so the city glow most oftentimes overpowered the aurora, but I spent many a night soothing a crying, colicky baby while watching the nothern lights shimmering above the city. It was small consolation for all the lost sleep, but beautiful nonetheless. Ironically, the best aurora display I've even seen was in July. There's not much nighttime available that time of year, and it doesn't really get really, really dark like on a no-moon night. Regardless, I ended up outside at just the right time with my eyes dark adapted enough to see a gorgeous display of the aurora right over Anchorage, despite the glow from the city lights. The team I was working with was waiting for a flight which ended up being cancelled, so we were out on the helipad for about an hour before we noticed. It was so pretty we ended up staying out there staring at the sky for a long time afterwards even though we were all tired and hungry.

Never have gotten a decent photo of the aurora, takes more outdoors-in-the-middle-of-the-freezing-night-time and patience than I've been able to muster, not to mention a better camera and technique than I've got.

I
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Old 04-25-2007, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Another Day Closer
13,905 posts, read 1,971,306 times
Reputation: 3441
Quote:
Originally Posted by rotorhead View Post
If you're hoping to see the northern lights, keep in mind that their intensity is dependent on how active the sun is. Lots of spots and coronal mass ejections means lots of charged particles interacting with the earths magnetic fields to make the auroras. The sunspots vary with the suns 11-year-long cycle, near the "solar max" the auroras are intense and frequent, near the low of the cycle the aurora is quieter and infrequent.

When we were living in Eagle River about three years ago we caught the tail end of a big solar storm while driving in to Anchorage for work, what a show! The northern lights were so bright that you could even see them over the glow from the streetlights along the highway, which is phenomenal. The best time to see the aurora is typically in the winter, when the skys are clear and its so cold that you can hardly stand to be outside, but you can occasionally see them in summertime too despite the long daylight hours and the lack of total darkness.

Our house looked towards Anchorage so the city glow most oftentimes overpowered the aurora, but I spent many a night soothing a crying, colicky baby while watching the nothern lights shimmering above the city. It was small consolation for all the lost sleep, but beautiful nonetheless. Ironically, the best aurora display I've even seen was in July. There's not much nighttime available that time of year, and it doesn't really get really, really dark like on a no-moon night. Regardless, I ended up outside at just the right time with my eyes dark adapted enough to see a gorgeous display of the aurora right over Anchorage, despite the glow from the city lights. The team I was working with was waiting for a flight which ended up being cancelled, so we were out on the helipad for about an hour before we noticed. It was so pretty we ended up staying out there staring at the sky for a long time afterwards even though we were all tired and hungry.

Never have gotten a decent photo of the aurora, takes more outdoors-in-the-middle-of-the-freezing-night-time and patience than I've been able to muster, not to mention a better camera and technique than I've got.

I
Thanks rotorhead for the information. I can remember when I was a kid we would be allowed to sit up half the night with my mother watching an aruora. We lived in the country so there wasn't much light or pollution to spoil the veiw but we were in the trees and hills. I can remember her putting us in the car and driving to a field that was near our house so we would have a better view. It was always in the winter. I can remember her bundling us up in our snow suits etc. and running the car occasionally to keep us warm while we watched. I can rember one particular one where the entire sky was filled with ribbons of light that wavered and shimmered. It lasted for a long time and the memory of it is stuck vividly in my head. Today once in a great, great while you might see a small streak or a phantom of color, but that's all. I really regret that my children never got to see the display of the aurora that I did.
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