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Old 07-29-2007, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Happy wherever I am - Florida now
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There are a lot of businesses in Albany that are doing well. You'll learn in moving to NYS that there is a vast divide between the majority of the territory (landmass, ie upstate) and the majority of the population, ie, NYC.

Technically the state capital is in Albany, and indeed there are many state bldgs there. However, there are duplicate offices for most state entities in NYC, and that 's often where things are conducted. It's also where all of the money its. Completely different cultures too. It's rather nuts.
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Old 07-29-2007, 10:26 PM
 
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maybe everything is XXXL sized in texas ...but i want a good change..
would moving in to stay @ troy or saratoga be the way to go??
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Old 07-30-2007, 05:02 AM
 
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Default temong

Troy is not the place I would choose but outside of Troy like Brunswick is very nice. The city of Troy has a lot more crime and the parking is tuff. RPI college is the ony real nice thing to see there. Saratoga is so much better than Troy thats for sure.The reason the capital region has so many problems is that they kill small business. My brother and I had a small Electrical company there and they just taxed the hell out of us. if you charged $50 an hour they get 30 % off the top plus what ever they decided to add on top of that. I don't mind paying my fair share but it was better to work for someone else than go through the hassle of doing quaterly taxes with them. Thats why some many big and small business have lft the area. My brother still runs the shop ut he feels the pain from NY. I know in Texas they don't tax you no where near as NY does. A lot of politics that try to squeeze every nickle out of you.
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Old 07-30-2007, 06:30 AM
 
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This story was very favorable toward Troy and its improvements ->

Metroland Online - Features

I have no personal experience though as I live in a western suburb of Albany. I can say that downtown Troy has some very lovely architecture and is well preserved. It always looked like a well kept museum though without much population. Maybe that has changed now and people have discovered it.

I won't disagree on Saratoga though. Clearly that is the nicest town in the area. It is a wealthy area though so it may not come cheaply. It is hopping now there with the big Saratoga Racecourse going. Saratoga is right up there with Churchill Downs in thoroughbred racing lore.
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Old 07-30-2007, 07:35 PM
 
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Default Troy

I worked in Troy about 6 months ago and yes the buildings are nice but there nice in the Bronx also. My younger brother went to RPI which is right up there with some of the best engineering schools in the country. He lived in the city and he hated it. It was close to school but very un safe! He was attacked in front of the college. Not a big fan of Troy but thats my opinion.
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Old 07-30-2007, 08:20 PM
 
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I see there is a big new development planned for Troy waterfront....

The Hedley District, Downtown Troy NY

and the site plan -> Hedley District Renderings

Maybe it still has a ways to go, but I think people are rediscovering the urban areas around Albany/Troy as they tire of the longer commute to the suburbs. You'd have to call these people pioneers because a place like Troy still has plenty of bad elements and these are the first people to take that risk and move back in.
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Old 07-30-2007, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
25,852 posts, read 44,116,022 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Logan11 View Post
I see there is a big new development planned for Troy waterfront....

The Hedley District, Downtown Troy NY

and the site plan -> Hedley District Renderings

Maybe it still has a ways to go, but I think people are rediscovering the urban areas around Albany/Troy as they tire of the longer commute to the suburbs. You'd have to call these people pioneers because a place like Troy still has plenty of bad elements and these are the first people to take that risk and move back in.
Troy will bounce back, as will Schenectady and Albany. It will just take a little bit more time. After World War II, this nation's focus began to shift on expanding our roadways and promoting autocentrism, which resulted in suburban sprawl as we know it today. Sixty-two years after the war ended, a lot of people are finally starting to realize that we can't keep moving further and further and FURTHER away from our urban problems as gas prices continue to edge upward---at some point we must face our cities head-on in order to avoid an incredible commute. The era of upper-middle-class whites dominating suburbia while poor African-Americans are "trapped" in the city cores is beginning to abate as these same whites look for a change of scenery and begin to gentrify urban areas while these same African-Americans are starting to climb the socioeconomic ladder and are dabbling in suburbia. I think it might be quite interesting to see just how diverse our nation's suburbs will be in another 20 years or so as compared to how most of them are now.

The best thing all three cities could do is to begin marketing their respective downtowns like crazy as residential neighborhoods as opposed to just being 9-5 destinations for suburbanites to head to for work. I'm sure there is an untapped market in each downtown that is seeking loft housing, townhomes, rowhomes, condos, etc. that are "hip" and "chic" as opposed to the sterility of vinyl-clad McMansions on suburban cul-de-sacs (myself included in this growing category), and we'd be willing to "take the plunge" by moving to one of these downtowns to experience being able to walk to anything we could ever need. Scranton and Wilkes-Barre, PA are each currently working on several new downtown residential projects, and each of these new units is expected to sell quickly to a previously-underrepresented market of young professionals, graduate students, empty-nesters, and retirees.

By increasing your number of downtown residents, you increase the amount of 24/7 foot traffic in the neighborhood. This serves as a boon to existing businesses and will help to deter criminal activity (there's a reason why Manhattan's crime rate is so low---there's always potential eyewitnesses walking the streets). New "niche" businesses will also spring up to latch onto the growing foot traffic. Urban blight can be revitalized in record time if people would just start to give living in Troy, Schenectady, and Albany a shot again as opposed to running like sheep to subvisions in the 'burbs.
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Old 07-30-2007, 08:43 PM
 
90 posts, read 448,553 times
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I see this happening now already in Albany and Troy. (See the links I have posted re: Troy). Schenectady faces the greatest challenge. They have gone a long way toward revitalizing their main core, but getting humans to move near there has been tough. Recently though a large mixed retail, housing development was announced for the Mohawk River Waterfront on the site of the old ALCO (American Locomotive Company). Apparently they are going to preserve a few of the old Nineteenth Century buildings and build on the remainder. Maybe I can find a link to that one somewhere....
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Old 08-22-2007, 08:28 PM
 
21 posts, read 36,078 times
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based on yall good peoples advice..i've kinda boiled down the place 2 stay wud be:
Guilderland/Schenectady/east greenbush/north colonie/clifton park/saratoga/Bethlehem and Niskayuna

now the biggest question which is the top rated school district (i'm considering aspects like ballet/gymnastic schools/taekwondo/martial arts schools) parks/family recreationl. activities etc.

definitely know that lif3 will not be as cheap as Txs!!
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Old 08-22-2007, 09:01 PM
 
22 posts, read 74,456 times
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Saratoga, if you can afford it, the the most beautiful town in upstate NY! I dont live there but I never pass up a trip in the summers-esp in Aug when the town is really booming due to the horse track and music venue.

I vote Saratoga!
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