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Old 01-03-2016, 07:42 PM
 
52,755 posts, read 75,709,914 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cityanne View Post
Thank you.

You are definitely giving me more places to look.

We won't move until next Fall at the earliest - and possibly a year later than that, depends on several personal situations - but I wanted to start getting a feel for the area, and know what was or was not feasible. I'd looked at some of the individual towns, but Albany itself felt like a blur - this discussion helps. And I had looked at Union Street in Schenectady, which looked interesting.

We haven't ruled out getting a car eventually. I lived for years in Jersey City, where you absolutely can live without one - and you absolutely can do more things more easily with one... and I know both sides of that equation. But we don't want to get one immediately. (We are considering the option of renting one once or twice a month, which would give us more flexibility. Heavy shopping during the day, theatre at night, something like that... Still cheaper than buying one. We'll see what our options are.)

I'd actually started this process by looking at Syracuse - I used to have family there, I knew the area South of the city moderately well. It's still possible - I've been reading that forum, too. But DH doesn't want to go that far from NYC... he doesn't know Central NY at all, his family is South of here and he may need to be able to get to them quickly, and all our friends are in or near NYC. But there are friends of friends in the Capitol District - people we've met, or heard mentioned - so we'd be able to start with some connections in the area. All that seems to add up to keeping us in the Eastern part of the state.


So I'll keep looking around, pop in and out a bit, and try to get a feel for the area (and hopefully work out a chance to visit with friends *before* we're actually apartment hunting!)

And thanks for the help.
Cool and thanks for this information. I was just thinking of possibly some smaller cities like Ithaca or even Auburn due their revitalized or construction in Downtown and the ability to walk to places in Downtown like entertainment and some shopping. I thought of Auburn particularly due to COL, its Downtown housing, public theater, YMCA, Schweinfurth Art facility and particularly its Wegmans supermarket in its Downtown. It also has the Merry-Go-Round professional theater at Emerson Park on Owasco Lake. Auburn Downtown BID

https://goo.gl/maps/LZV7MPgDY7S2

With this said, it is too far away from NYC.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 01-03-2016 at 08:15 PM..
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Old 01-05-2016, 08:39 PM
 
Location: New York City
11 posts, read 11,461 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Cool and thanks for this information. I was just thinking of possibly some smaller cities like Ithaca or even Auburn due their revitalized or construction in Downtown and the ability to walk to places in Downtown like entertainment and some shopping. I thought of Auburn particularly due to COL, its Downtown housing, public theater, YMCA, Schweinfurth Art facility and particularly its Wegmans supermarket in its Downtown. It also has the Merry-Go-Round professional theater at Emerson Park on Owasco Lake. Auburn Downtown BID

https://goo.gl/maps/LZV7MPgDY7S2

With this said, it is too far away from NYC.

I'd actually looked specifically at both of them...

My parents spent their final years in Ithaca, and my mother, particularly (who had always lived in NYC) was very happy with her comfort level there. ("It's cosmopolitan!" she would say... ) But the entire point of moving out of the area is to significantly reduce our cost of living - and Ithaca doesn't do that well enough. For those prices, we'd return to New Jersey, and stay closer to the life we already have.

And the last of my relatives still in Central NY are in Auburn. I'm not particularly close to them any more, but it did make the area worth looking at carefully. (And Wegmans... sigh... I've been to the one in Ithaca - that was a big pull for Central NY!)

In the end, though, it looks like geography will win. And DH has spent some time in Schenectady, so it feels more familiar to him. (Though honestly, he didn't see much of the city - he was mostly there visiting.)

I'll keep poking around and familiarizing myself with the area... Thank you again.
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Old 01-08-2016, 09:59 AM
 
52,755 posts, read 75,709,914 times
Reputation: 11641
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cityanne View Post
I'd actually looked specifically at both of them...

My parents spent their final years in Ithaca, and my mother, particularly (who had always lived in NYC) was very happy with her comfort level there. ("It's cosmopolitan!" she would say... ) But the entire point of moving out of the area is to significantly reduce our cost of living - and Ithaca doesn't do that well enough. For those prices, we'd return to New Jersey, and stay closer to the life we already have.

And the last of my relatives still in Central NY are in Auburn. I'm not particularly close to them any more, but it did make the area worth looking at carefully. (And Wegmans... sigh... I've been to the one in Ithaca - that was a big pull for Central NY!)

In the end, though, it looks like geography will win. And DH has spent some time in Schenectady, so it feels more familiar to him. (Though honestly, he didn't see much of the city - he was mostly there visiting.)

I'll keep poking around and familiarizing myself with the area... Thank you again.
Is he from NYC? What areas of Schenectady appealed to him?

Here was another place I thought about, but is even further away. It has that "look" in parts of it though: http://www.city-data.com/forum/42553987-post52.html
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Old 01-17-2016, 09:03 PM
 
9 posts, read 6,967 times
Reputation: 17
I grew up in the Pine Hills area and if I could choose anywhere to retire, I'd go back to my old neighborhood. I lived a few blocks south of the intersection of Madison and Main. That area is very walkable--a 78 on the walkstore rating system. Within five blocks in any direction, you will find a theater (multiplex, "upgraded" from a gorgeous old 20's theater, but I digress), a respectable price chopper (it's not ghetto--it's not Whole Foods but I've been in NYC supermarkets and it's much bigger and better than that), banks, coffee shops, lots of restaurants, a library, churches, banks, cvs, etc. You do NOT need a car in this area.

Here's a google view--take a walk around.

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.6647.../data=!3m1!1e3

Public bus service is great in that area. You can hop a bus and go downtown, or head out to the malls, indoor and outdoor.

Albany is not NYC, however. It's colder and snowier. And there are not a lot of newer apartment complexes. It's sort of hunt and peck, but rent can be cheap. If you want to buy a house in that area, you can get something decent for under 150k.

Pine Hills is also known as the "student ghetto". If you're searching east of S. Main on Morris, Myrtle, Yates, etc., you will see a lot of closely spaced older multi-family homes. I advise again to go into google and just walk around. Walk west on Madison from Main, and just go down the side streets. It's a pleasantly bustling place with little crime and a lot of families.
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Old 01-18-2016, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 6,939,685 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leslie41 View Post
I grew up in the Pine Hills area and if I could choose anywhere to retire, I'd go back to my old neighborhood. I lived a few blocks south of the intersection of Madison and Main. That area is very walkable--a 78 on the walkstore rating system. Within five blocks in any direction, you will find a theater (multiplex, "upgraded" from a gorgeous old 20's theater, but I digress), a respectable price chopper (it's not ghetto--it's not Whole Foods but I've been in NYC supermarkets and it's much bigger and better than that), banks, coffee shops, lots of restaurants, a library, churches, banks, cvs, etc. You do NOT need a car in this area.

Here's a google view--take a walk around.

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.6647.../data=!3m1!1e3

Public bus service is great in that area. You can hop a bus and go downtown, or head out to the malls, indoor and outdoor.

Albany is not NYC, however. It's colder and snowier. And there are not a lot of newer apartment complexes. It's sort of hunt and peck, but rent can be cheap. If you want to buy a house in that area, you can get something decent for under 150k.

Pine Hills is also known as the "student ghetto". If you're searching east of S. Main on Morris, Myrtle, Yates, etc., you will see a lot of closely spaced older multi-family homes. I advise again to go into google and just walk around. Walk west on Madison from Main, and just go down the side streets. It's a pleasantly bustling place with little crime and a lot of families.
When I lived in Albany, I was always impressed by the CDTA bus service. For a city its size, Albany had excellent public transport. I worked in both downtown Albany and in Menands while I lived in Ravena, Troy, and Colonie, and found that catching a bus from a park-and-ride or even from Troy or my area of Colonie to downtown or to the malls was never a problem. When I worked in Menands, several of my co-workers who lived in Albany did not drive at all or who did not drive to work.

In regards to the Price Chopper on Delaware: it's an urban store that serves the people in the neighborhood, some of whom are people of color, some of whom are immigrants, and some of whom are poor, but there are a lot of middle class people living in the area, too. An essential part of living in a city, as opposed to living out in the suburbs, is that you will often mix with people who aren't like yourself.
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