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Old 12-06-2010, 06:18 AM
 
11 posts, read 15,540 times
Reputation: 12
183 days time 6.5 =1189.5 hours worked, so making $30,000 a year comes out to $25 an hour. That's not bad at all for this economy. I know there's a cliche that teachers work a lot of hours, but with 3 kids in school I have my doubts.

I have to work 40-50 hours a week every week to make less money and be held accountable for my results. So teachers don't have it too bad.
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Old 12-06-2010, 05:32 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
909 posts, read 1,174,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
Yes, your periods and comas seem to be mixed up, you did not provide your source, and that appears to be starting for "Level I: Teachers, Pathway Nurses, Counselors, Social Workers, and Interpreters".

I have known a few teachers over the years. They are hard working individuals which I have respected. I don't recall any of them wanting to be teachers just for the pay...

How about the real pay scale ranges available at APS:

2010-2011 Schedule The following schedule is based on a 183 day (6.5hrs/day) work schedule.

1) Bachelor's degree - $30,000.00 to $68,759.00
2) Master's degree - $30,002.00 $77,260.00
3) Ph.D. - $30,006.00 - $78,976.00


Pay schedules available at: Salaries; Albuquerque Public Schools


Rich
Hahahahaha!!! I have an MA, in my 19th year of teaching, and don't make even close to what it says is the top pay for a BA, let alone an MA!!! The top numbers here are wayyyyyyyy off! I'm maxed out at my salary at Tier 3. Haven't had a raise in 3 or 4 years. Actually have had a decrease in pay due to one less work day this year, plus the yearly increases in health insurance and retirement contributions. And now there's a proposal on the table saying teachers won't get full retirement until 35 years of service. So they are going to add on 5 extra years, plus increase the amount we have to pay (which they've already done recently and want to do it again).

Oh, I forgot -- I did get a dollar raise this year as my step increase from year 18 to year 19.


Quote:
Originally Posted by A Flock Of Budgies View Post
Rich,

We are at the BOTTOM of the barrel when it comes to teacher salaries. Go look at what they pay in Texas and you will see what I mean.
Actually, Richardson helped us get out of that hole by starting the three-tier licensure/pay system. We are still on the bottom half, but at least we are not 2nd or 3rd from the bottom, which is what it used to be years ago.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
No... But you seem to have drifted from the original topic of this thread. "Does the phrase, "NM is a poor state" apply to Albuquerque?". I think your reply may be part of the answer, but I do not believe APS teacher salaries is a complete answer.


Rich
Isn't the topic of this thread, "How do we improve APS?"

Quote:
Originally Posted by rlpinca View Post
183 days time 6.5 =1189.5 hours worked, so making $30,000 a year comes out to $25 an hour. That's not bad at all for this economy. I know there's a cliche that teachers work a lot of hours, but with 3 kids in school I have my doubts.

I have to work 40-50 hours a week every week to make less money and be held accountable for my results. So teachers don't have it too bad.
If you think teachers work even close to 6.5 hours a day, you are very wrong. Today I got home early and that's only putting in 8 hours. Usually it's closer to 9 1/2 or 10 hours. We also don't get paid for lunch, but we have to be there. There are required meetings that are not included in those hours, either. Teachers also have before school, after school, or lunch duties that are also not included in the 6.5 hours. So even if a teacher worked bell-to-bell and did no extra work at all, they still work more than 6.5 hours a day. Yes, there are those that do work the minimum, but I think you'd be surprised at how many teachers work lots more than this. Take a look at the parking lot after school. The teachers that do leave say 30 minutes after school lets out, are carting crates on wheels behind them with all of their work to take home and do for the evening. Show up at a school an hour before school starts and 50% of the teachers will be there getting ready for the day.
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Old 12-06-2010, 05:39 PM
 
Location: New Mexico USA
17,017 posts, read 17,586,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lobo View Post
Isn't the topic of this thread, "How do we improve APS?"
Yes, the topic of this thread is "How do we improve APS?", however, the related posts were moved from another thread.
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Old 12-06-2010, 06:05 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
437 posts, read 591,647 times
Reputation: 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by rlpinca View Post
183 days time 6.5 =1189.5 hours worked, so making $30,000 a year comes out to $25 an hour. That's not bad at all for this economy. I know there's a cliche that teachers work a lot of hours, but with 3 kids in school I have my doubts.

I have to work 40-50 hours a week every week to make less money and be held accountable for my results. So teachers don't have it too bad.
You don't know what you're talking about. You think you do because you have your kids in public school, just like almost every other parent who walks into the school. "The teachers are bad, they're not accountable, they don't have it so bad, blah, blah, blah."

BS. Too many parents think the way you do. They have this sort of arrogance about them when it come to teachers, just because they were able to reproduced. I work in an elementary school so I know what I'm talking about. Having kids just means that you had kids, it doesn't mean that you get it.

Ever heard of teachers doing grading at night and on the weekends? You think everything ends for the teacher when the afternoon bell rings? You think a teacher hanging around the campus before, and after school does it for s**** and giggles?

Why don't you talk to the teachers of your 3 kids and ask them about how many hours they work a week. Ask them how much work they do at school, and how much they take home with them. Ask them what it's like being in charge of 20 - 30 different little human beings (or bigger human beings) for 7 hours a day.

In your mind, it's a cliche, but in fact it's the truth. Tons of teachers do put in 40 to 50 hours of work a week. That's their tough luck. You put in that many hours for less than $30,000 a year, that's your tough luck.
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Old 12-06-2010, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Richmond, VA
298 posts, read 619,606 times
Reputation: 216
I think it's pretty much a fact that teachers get paid less than any other profession that requires an advanced degree. I can't think of another profession that asks you to have a Master's degree and pays $30k a year. And a 40 hour work week is a dream. However, there are other compensations, as other have noted, primarily summers off. It's a personal decision whether it's worth it to you. Increasingly, after 6 years of teaching, I'm finding that it's not, mainly because I've found that there is little respect for my profession in this city. I have never had parents ask a kid, right in front of me, if I'm telling the truth about an incident. I've never been accused of picking on a student (again, by their parent) because I keep calling to report their disruptive behavior. The kids take their cues from their parents, and I'm finding it pretty hard to get anything done. No pay, no respect and no personal satisfaction? No thanks.

Anyway, how can we improve APS? My 1st suggestion would be to create a system that recognizes that all students aren't the same. I realize this is a national issue, but this No Child Left Behind nonsense is crazy. Why should hard-working students who are ready to move on to the next level be held back by those who aren't? I literally have students for whom I feel sorry, they are sitting there patiently waiting to learn while less-interested kid A is yelling "What page?" five minutes after class has started, and less-interested kid B is making a paper airplane, and less-interested kid C is trying to leave class to talk to the girl in the hall.

Second, related, put the teeth back in discipline. It is nearly impossible for a student to get left back. Even if they have done no homework, failed every test, and drawn pictures through every class. Even after I have called their parent every week to try to find a way to address these issues. Also, it's pretty tough to get suspended and I believe there is a cap on the number of days a kid can be put out. So a kid can fight, disrupt, disrupt, disrupt, and pretty much know nothing is going to happen to them. They get a couple of days off, and the next year they are going to the next grade anyway. Then they get to High School and are finally held accountable - no wonder they drop out. They weren't prepared for that.
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Old 12-08-2010, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Abu Al-Qurq
2,802 posts, read 4,208,882 times
Reputation: 1627
Quote:
They have this sort of arrogance about them when it come to teachers, just because they were able to reproduced.
Quote:
I work in an elementary school so I know what I'm talking about.
Priceless. On the one hand, questionable proofreading, and on the other, an assertion that teachers are above scrutiny.

Jobs with M.A. holders that pay similar to teaching include social workers, theologians, paralegal work, and foresters. These jobs are similar in that they are more secure than average, include generous benefits, and can draw from plenty of available talent.

In private industry, the magic figure for the number of hours worked in a year tends to be 2,000 hours. That's 50 wks/yr, 40 hrs/wk, with vacations, sick leave, holidays, etc. making up the the last two weeks.

According to this informative blog, U.S. teachers average spending 1,100 hours teaching per year, more than any other country. Throw in lunch, recess duty, prep periods, grading papers, conferences, etc., and you'll still come up far short of 2,000 hours. The number's probably closer to 1,440 (36 weeks * 40 hrs/wk) for good (not exceptional, just good) teachers.
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Old 12-09-2010, 07:32 PM
 
210 posts, read 219,465 times
Reputation: 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by rlpinca View Post
183 days time 6.5 =1189.5 hours worked, so making $30,000 a year comes out to $25 an hour. That's not bad at all for this economy. I know there's a cliche that teachers work a lot of hours, but with 3 kids in school I have my doubts.

I have to work 40-50 hours a week every week to make less money and be held accountable for my results. So teachers don't have it too bad.
Did you go to school to get a Masters degree in order to get tenure? Are you paying off student loans after investing 5-6 years into a college education? Do you have to deal with disruptive kids, great kids who want to learn, budget cuts, helicopter parents and various administrators? Teachers here are way underpaid.
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Old 12-09-2010, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Abu Al-Qurq
2,802 posts, read 4,208,882 times
Reputation: 1627
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwest liberal View Post
Did you go to school to get a Masters degree in order to get tenure? Are you paying off student loans after investing 5-6 years into a college education?
Do you have to deal with disruptive kids, great kids who want to learn, budget cuts, helicopter parents and various administrators?
If they've got a valid point to make, what does it matter if they've gone through teacher training? Teacher chauvinism has no place in an open discussion.

Quote:
Teachers here are way underpaid.
How many unfilled positions are there for teachers, where no qualified applicants want the job? Not too many. In a strictly economic sense, I'd say the opposite is true.

Or maybe you could look at it the way McDonald's workers are underpaid, and plumbers are underpaid, CEO's are underpaid, and doctors are underpaid. Everybody's underpaid. Well, except congress.
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Old 12-09-2010, 09:09 PM
 
1,973 posts, read 2,742,263 times
Reputation: 782
Quote:
Originally Posted by midwest liberal View Post
Did you go to school to get a Masters degree in order to get tenure? Are you paying off student loans after investing 5-6 years into a college education?
No. I worked my way through university paying as I went and sleeping part time.

No loans, no debt, no whining, no regret.
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Old 12-09-2010, 09:12 PM
 
1,973 posts, read 2,742,263 times
Reputation: 782
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoidberg View Post
If they've got a valid point to make, what does it matter if they've gone through teacher training? Teacher chauvinism has no place in an open discussion.
It keeps on coming up because if we're foolish enough to accept it, then we can no
longer criticize. I don't play violin, but I can certainly tell when one is being played badly.
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