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Old 12-07-2008, 12:29 AM
 
Location: Denver, CO
5,457 posts, read 13,538,197 times
Reputation: 4397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Rankin View Post
Wow shmikker, that is quite the provocative post. How about "well-kept trailers on large parcels of unaltered land instead of ugly ***, abandoned, cookie-cutter homes."

Anyway, you better not be criticizing El Paso or EnjoyEP's gonna bust in here and clean your clock.

p.s. Good post above, Yukon. Many parts of the country have developers pay impact fees - it slows down the development to a sustainable pace, and provides a more equitable and solid source of funding for the infrastructure projects.
Speaking of EnjoyEP, where is he? I haven't seen him on this forum in months!
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Old 12-07-2008, 01:26 AM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,584 posts, read 9,101,208 times
Reputation: 1940
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
Speaking of EnjoyEP, where is he? I haven't seen him on this forum in months!


I know, I was wondering the same thing.
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Old 12-07-2008, 07:07 AM
 
1,763 posts, read 3,624,765 times
Reputation: 729
Quote:
Originally Posted by yukon View Post
Does the city/county charge impact fees here?
Good question Yukon, and I don't know the answer. You mentioned Fla; they had also started them in our hometown in MD a few years back. Although home prices went up, most people liked them because the cost of the improvements went to the developers instead of existing [and new] taxpayers. The developers promptly passed on the costs to new homebuyers [big surprise].
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Old 12-07-2008, 07:24 AM
 
1,763 posts, read 3,624,765 times
Reputation: 729
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegaspilgrim View Post
Speaking of EnjoyEP, where is he? I haven't seen him on this forum in months!
Maybe he's in the middle of a move back to Albuq(?), but that's just a wild guess. Also M.I.A. is Mortimer. This is becoming a crisis on city-data, kind of like the financial crisis, but worse...
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Old 12-07-2008, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Burque!
3,697 posts, read 6,085,356 times
Reputation: 729
lol... much worse.
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Old 07-21-2010, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque
5,554 posts, read 8,840,782 times
Reputation: 2427
Default What can Albuquerque do to reduce sprawl?

Since this topic is usually off-topic in other threads, I thought I would
start it here. That way anyone who wants to rant about how "stupid"
the "planners" are and how wonderful dense housing is, can do it here.

Anyone getting off on a rant elsewhere can be re-directed to here.

I'm also curious just what kind of ideas people have.
I look forward to trashing those that I disagree with.

### ============================================= ###

As for me, I live in a 1-story 2300 sq ft house on a lot where I can
touch my house and the property wall on either side. Since I live on
the East side, it's not sprawl, of course. Only those people who live
on the West side - climbing up the West Mesa contribute to the sprawl.

I'll just go on record that I don't want to do anything to regulate sprawl
on a direct basis. I'm for stuff that makes sprawl less likely to happen.

I'm already on record that I think gasoline and petroleum should be taxed
to the point that we in the US no longer import any. A rise in the price
of fuel would naturally reduce sprawl.

I also support mass transit - which also serves to reduce sprawl and
make more room on the roads for Zoidberg to drive fast.

I like making it easier to use a bike to get around in ways that don't
impede auto traffic and get drivers P-O'd at bicyclists. Bikers will
tend not to live far out in the suburbs for obvious reasons.
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Old 07-21-2010, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Del Norte NM
530 posts, read 722,190 times
Reputation: 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by mortimer View Post
Since this topic is usually off-topic in other threads, I thought I would
start it here. That way anyone who wants to rant about how "stupid"
the "planners" are and how wonderful dense housing is, can do it here.

Anyone getting off on a rant elsewhere can be re-directed to here.

I'm also curious just what kind of ideas people have.
I look forward to trashing those that I disagree with.

### ============================================= ###

As for me, I live in a 1-story 2300 sq ft house on a lot where I can
touch my house and the property wall on either side. Since I live on
the East side, it's not sprawl, of course. Only those people who live
on the West side - climbing up the West Mesa contribute to the sprawl.

I'll just go on record that I don't want to do anything to regulate sprawl
on a direct basis. I'm for stuff that makes sprawl less likely to happen.

I'm already on record that I think gasoline and petroleum should be taxed
to the point that we in the US no longer import any. A rise in the price
of fuel would naturally reduce sprawl.

I also support mass transit - which also serves to reduce sprawl and
make more room on the roads for Zoidberg to drive fast.

I like making it easier to use a bike to get around in ways that don't
impede auto traffic and get drivers P-O'd at bicyclists. Bikers will
tend not to live far out in the suburbs for obvious reasons.
For starters you can charge people from the West Coast $30,000 for their driver's license, $300,000 for East Coasters and a cool million for Texans.

The above is joke but seriously, I don't think you can do a whole lot about sprawl. We're a mobile society, the central part of New Mexico is a pretty part of the country and it seems everybody, I mean everybody wants to move there.

The City of Santa Fe imposes impact fees on contruction but they don't really charge enough to discourage building. One thing Santa Fe is doing is raising the water rates sky high. I think they are raising the rates something like 8% percent per year for the next 8 years. I'd have to doublecheck that but I think that's was I read in the NewMexican.

The City of Boulder several years ago placed a moratorium on any new construction on vacant land. That drove the prices so high that regular folks can't live there.

I think right now would be a good time to place something like that on Central New Mexico because my house has lost so much value. On the other hand that is like telling someone to close the door now that I'm here. It isn't fair.

Also, people like to go to the Santa Fe ski area and Sandia Crest for recreation. I'd be inclined to say that gas would have to get really expensive in order to stop people from doing that.

I like your idea on mass transit but people will still find a way to sprawl like using alterantive fuels.

The only real way to limit sprawl is to limit population growth. There are no answers, that I know of, to do the latter.
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Old 07-21-2010, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque
133 posts, read 155,705 times
Reputation: 123
For one, ABQ needs to stop investing so heavily on infrastructure at the fringe or expensive interchanges that encourage growth at the fringe. Redirecting some of those funds toward inner-city projects or incentives to grow inward would be a start. The "more lanes" and "more parking" themes are so ingrained in everyone's psyche that it'll take at least a generation to turn the ship, unfortunately.
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Old 07-21-2010, 11:20 AM
 
1,974 posts, read 2,645,638 times
Reputation: 780
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanabq View Post
Redirecting some of those funds toward inner-city projects or incentives to grow inward would be a start.
What would those be?
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Old 07-21-2010, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque
6,084 posts, read 6,256,661 times
Reputation: 5882
The city could create zones that are defined by areas in proximity to retail zones (thus high in 'walkability') and public transportation/bike routes (thus reducing the need for autos). These zones when re-developed or infill developed would then receive property tax rebates and further rebates for being developed with medium or higher housing densities.
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