U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Mexico > Albuquerque
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-03-2017, 12:43 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque
136 posts, read 95,829 times
Reputation: 94

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by rwjoyak View Post
Here's a few other C-D threads that include some posts on Mirehaven vs Alegria:

- Jubliee at Los Lunas, NM
- Places to look - HOA questions
- Homes in Alegria
- Retirement Communities in New Mexico

As a 7-yr Alegria resident and former HOA board member, I'm admittedly biased in favor of Alegria. As I said in the above threads, I think there's some good reasons for this. This includes IMO a prettier setting right by the Rio Grande bosque. But I also recognize that others may disagree. You really need to visit both communities to form your own impressions.

Feel free to send me a PM if you have any specific questions about Alegria.
I have an honest question, what actually attracts people to the 55+age communities. Is it the lack of kids. I really don't understand?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-03-2017, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Bernalillo, NM
1,114 posts, read 1,998,071 times
Reputation: 2046
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackbus View Post
I have an honest question, what actually attracts people to the 55+age communities. Is it the lack of kids. I really don't understand?
It's different for different folks. Some of the attractions include:

- A large variety of organized available activities and events which residents are free to pick and choose from. If you're coming new into an area, this provides an easy way to experience new things, become familiar with the area and its activities, etc., without having to spend a lot of time figuring this out on your own.

- Onsite available amenities. At Alegria this includes a clubhouse facility, outdoor patios and community BBQs, indoor and outdoor swimming pools, outdoor spa, a workout facility with weight and cardio machines, yoga and other workout classes, bocce courts, horseshoe pit, ping pong table, walking trails, etc. A majority of the larger 55+ communities also have an adjacent golf course, some have onsite restaurants, specialty rooms (woodworking, arts and crafts, sculpturing, computers, pool tables, game rooms), etc. Residents can access these facilities within the community, without having to find them in the larger area, decide which ones to use, pay separate fees for their use, drive to and from them for daily use, etc.

- Having these amenities available within the community makes many residents feel like they are living in a resort without having to travel there or pay resort prices. For example, some folks hang out a lot at the outdoor pool, while others hardly use it. But all have the option of doing so, either by themselves or with invited guests.

- A significant number of other new people, particularly during initial community build-out, many looking for similar things, which gives you an easy opportunity to make friends and acquaintances in a strange area, much easier and quicker than the time it typically takes a new arrival to do this in a new place. You and your new friends can just hang out together; take part in some of the organized community activities; or do things on your own, such as hiking, bicycling, golfing, beer crawls,...; the list goes on and on.

- A near immediate sense of belonging to a group of friendly, mostly like-minded folks. When moving to a new area, IMO many folks get this from whatever new job they have. But especially if you're retired, you can flounder quite a bit in a new area, trying to figure out how you fit into the area. Part of this is about making new friends, but it's also about deciding whether the area is a good fit for you and vice versa. I think a lot of the comments we see on C-D, about people moving somewhere and then expressing concerns about the area or how they perceive they are being treated, relate to this issue. Moving into a 55+ community, which aids in welcoming new residents and helping them fit in, really helps on this.

- Yes, it is possible to find all of the above elsewhere in ABQ and other communities. But having all this within the 55+ development makes it much easier for folks - who may be less extroverted or don't want to work hard doing this - to find and join these. Most of the above (golf membership being one exception) also comes free with the HOA fee in a 55+ community, so this is a less costly approach for seniors carefully watching their budgets, than joining an individual health club, etc.

- The folks in a 55+ community can also act as a support group for residents who may have health issues or otherwise need a hand when issues arise. This is particularly true for seniors who do not have any other family in the area. I realize similar support may be available in normal, mixed use communities, but some seniors find it a lot easier to reach out to neighbors who are may be going through similar issues.

- While a small percentage of folks may move into a 55+ community because of no kids being there (except for grandchildren or others who are visiting), I think a broader view of this issue is that such a community means residents are at similar stages in life and often have more in common with their neighbors than they would in a mixed-use development. For the large majority, jobs are less important and finding friendly folks with like interests are more important. It's not that most residents don't like kids, it's more about maximizing the potential for finding friends.

- BTW, most 55+ communities such as Alegria do allow residents as young as 18, but the principal homeowner must be 55+. The prohibition on younger than 18 helps minimize issues that can be contentious in a neighborhood such as neighbors playing loud music, driving loud cars, working on cars in their front yards, etc.

- I know some folks have posted that they wouldn't be able to handle the small yards that are typical in a 55+ community, but my wife and I like this aspect. We've had 5+ acres in the country, we've had a big green yard with lots of grass to mow and keep watered (in KY), we've had larger yards where we can have parties with lots of friends and neighbors. In Alegria, our yard is big enough to have some friends over but needed maintenance is pretty minimal. If we need a bigger space, we can use one of the common areas in the community. We get the pluses of all the common amenities without the cost, time and effort of having to maintain them. This can become more and more of an issue as folks age.

A 55+ community is definitely not for everyone. But when Del Webb opened the first of these communities in the Phoenix area, he clearly found a new, under-served market. His first development sold much faster than even he ever imagined it would. And these communities continue to be very popular.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2018, 06:45 AM
 
1 posts, read 542 times
Reputation: 10
Question Are there many golfers in Allegria

Are there many people who golf and live in Allegria?
Which courses do they typically golf at?
Are there any leagues run by people from Allegria?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2018, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Bernalillo, NM
1,114 posts, read 1,998,071 times
Reputation: 2046
Quote:
Originally Posted by artistgolferwannabe View Post
Are there many people who golf and live in Allegria?
Which courses do they typically golf at?
Are there any leagues run by people from Allegria?
I live in Alegria. I don't play, but there are quite a few residents that do.
They rotate courses, including Los Altos, Desert Greens, Pueblo de Cochiti, and the University of NM courses.
There's no league here, but the community activities director organizes two golf scrambles per year, at Santa Ana at the beginning & end of the season.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:




Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New Mexico > Albuquerque
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top