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Old 02-02-2009, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Chihuahuan Desert
2,576 posts, read 5,231,228 times
Reputation: 1260

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Here we go again. You obviously dont pay attention to weather. How do I know this? For starters, 90 degrees with 100% humidity has never nor will never occur. Youre using a ridiculous guesstimate. Secondly, if you honestly think MN is warm, I suggest you run far away from most of New Mexico. Do you know how many days Minneapolis averages that are over 90 degrees? 15. 15 out of 365 days. Thats nothing. Yes, it can be humid at times, but please, lets not overexaggerate MN's summer weather. Weatherbase: Historical Weather for Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America

And while I think ABQ has a pretty nice climate, I will warn you that summers there are quite hot, despite being dry. ABQ averages over 4 times the amount of 90+ days that MPLS receives (66 vs 15). So Ill just warn you again, that if you dont like hot weather, than the summers in ABQ might not be too appealing for you. I can also tell you that ABQ's weather, although hot, is probably the best in the southwest, by far. El Paso is pretty decent, too.
I have to disagree.

The "hot" Albuquerque summer is a matter of personal perspective. I enjoyed my first summer here, last year, and found myself wondering quite often when it would get hot(seriously). But then, I used to live in extremely hot spots (Phoenix, Dallas) and extremely hot humid spots (New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Houston, Miami, Tampa), so ABQ's summer is just right .... for me. Some humidity from the rain, and hot but not too hot. It all depends on your personal points of reference.

90 degrees/100% humidity may not exist in MN or the city being referenced, but it does exist. And it sucks.
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Old 02-02-2009, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Burque!
3,695 posts, read 6,482,968 times
Reputation: 743
Air you can wear. co*Houston Sucks!*ugh
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Old 02-03-2009, 12:35 AM
 
Location: Chihuahuan Desert
2,576 posts, read 5,231,228 times
Reputation: 1260
Been there, done that, Rybert. Soooooooooo happy to breathe peacefully here in ABQ And the little tar balls on your car in the mornings in Beaumont...ewww!
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Old 02-03-2009, 12:39 AM
 
Location: Burque!
3,695 posts, read 6,482,968 times
Reputation: 743
Oh man. I guess I wasn't there long enough to experience the "tar balls." That sounds awful! The furthest East I had to travel was Baytown.
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Old 02-03-2009, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Emmaus, PA --> ABQ, NM
1,039 posts, read 1,581,674 times
Reputation: 296
Wow this is my first post. I've been thinking about moving to Rio Rancho for like the past two weeks. I was born & raised in NYC. I think at my ripe age of 36 I don’t think I need to be educated on street smarts. I’ve experienced all the highs and lows a city could offer including weather, traffic, etc… Honestly, I could live without all the hassles that come with living in a big city. All this talk about gangs and city life is for each his own. My take is this, if you’re a person with good moral foundations, don’t spend your time worrying about gangs, and spend the time thinking about how you can better the neighbor in which you live in. Where we live which is two hours north of NYC, there are still gangs. I pay no mind to them & they don’t pay any mind to me. Gangs could be found in the biggest of all cities, right down to the tiniest of hamlets. Unfortunately is just a way of life in today’s society.

Our plan is to move come 2010 after our oldest graduates from high school. We’ve been thinking about moving to North Carolina. Seeing how so many New Yorkers are relocating to the Raleigh area, I’m not sure if this is a viable option anymore. Plus for the type of work I do (technology sector) the types of jobs I would be qualified would be scant. My wife cousins who was born and raised in Brooklyn as well, has been living in Rio Rancho the past eight years. It was a tough go at first but now he has a successful business and he loves the area. I would welcome the idea of moving out there. My only two concerns would be housing and schools. My youngest would be starting school next year, so where he goes is important. Of course housing is an issue. Where we currently live, I have one neighbor and that’s it. As much as I enjoy the peace and quietness I think I could settle into a suburban area and become acquainted with my neighbors.


I’m finishing up my bachelor’s degree in management information system. With my degree and about ten year’s experience, I don’t think finding a job in the tech sector should be an issue. I’d be willing to take a position has an lvl III tech if the opportunity presented itself. I’ve also would be willing to take a P.D. exam as a fall back options. I always wanted to be a cop so maybe a new career is in the works. Since my wife is no longer able to work. She receives a nice monthly check from Uncle Sam. What she receives from the govt. remains the same no matter where she lives. What she brings in covers more than enough of our monthly expenses.

I also have to mention, I own a 06 gsxr 750. So twisties are kind of imporant but not necessary.

Last edited by thelazyone; 02-03-2009 at 09:24 AM..
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Old 02-03-2009, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque
5,553 posts, read 9,561,157 times
Reputation: 2462
yukon pointed out:

> The "hot" Albuquerque summer is a matter of personal perspective.

Also, you can't compare a 95-deg high in Albuquerque with
one in Dallas or Atlanta.

In Albuquerque, if it attains 95 degrees at 2 pm, it will only be 90
or so at 1 pm and later and 3 pm. At Noon, it might only be 80 and
the temperature will be back to 80 again at 5 pm. In parts of the city
where it goes above 100-105 on the days the "official" high is 95, the
same rapid ramp-up-down still happens.

Go out at midnight in Houston or Memphis in the middle of summer.
Is it comfortable? Not likely. In Albuquerque? Yes. Always.

How is it just before the sun comes up? In Houston, it wasn't decent
until sometime in October. In Albuquerque you get relieve every day.
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Old 02-03-2009, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Emmaus, PA --> ABQ, NM
1,039 posts, read 1,581,674 times
Reputation: 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by mortimer View Post
yukon pointed out:

> The "hot" Albuquerque summer is a matter of personal perspective.

Also, you can't compare a 95-deg high in Albuquerque with
one in Dallas or Atlanta.

In Albuquerque, if it attains 95 degrees at 2 pm, it will only be 90
or so at 1 pm and later and 3 pm. At Noon, it might only be 80 and
the temperature will be back to 80 again at 5 pm. In parts of the city
where it goes above 100-105 on the days the "official" high is 95, the
same rapid ramp-up-down still happens.

Go out at midnight in Houston or Memphis in the middle of summer.
Is it comfortable? Not likely. In Albuquerque? Yes. Always.

How is it just before the sun comes up? In Houston, it wasn't decent
until sometime in October. In Albuquerque you get relieve every day.
The North East isn't any better. With my sinus issues I could do without the humidity.
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Old 02-03-2009, 11:39 AM
 
52 posts, read 118,404 times
Reputation: 34
Lazyone. I love Albuquerque. It does take a bit of getting use to. I dont think their is another city like this in the country. It has its own pace, does its own thing.....but somehow it all works. Has a wide variety of peoples, and a very accepting society. Kind of a "whatever" attitude. Peope here appreciate a variety of different things. For example, a wreck of a house built next to a mansion is just an eyesore most places. Here, its considered unique and quaint because its much of what this state is about...past and present. I dont think it would be the city it is tho, if it werent for the raw natural beauty we have here. Takes a special eye to see it. If youre a big fan of "green," and water, tidy little treelines streets, definitely not the place for you.

Public school system here is so so. Always has been. Albuquerque is all one big district.....one of, if not the largest in the country. Good thing or not? Here you need to shop individually for schools. Better neighborhoods = better schools. Big variance here. R.R is its own district. I think schools are ok, but R.R. always seems to have its money issues. Personally, I dont get it. Taxes are substantially lower than ABQ, and most of the homes going up substantially larger......and they build 'em on dirt roads. Why not just raise taxes to do it right the first time? If your building a 500K home, its not like ya cant afford it, right? Probably has to do with nepatism, which is a powerful thing in this state. Here, who ya know can make a big difference.

Nuf said for now. C
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Old 02-03-2009, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
1,067 posts, read 1,883,870 times
Reputation: 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by thelazyone View Post
Wow this is my first post. I've been thinking about moving to Rio Rancho for like the past two weeks. I was born & raised in NYC. I think at my ripe age of 36 I don’t think I need to be educated on street smarts. I’ve experienced all the highs and lows a city could offer including weather, traffic, etc… Honestly, I could live without all the hassles that come with living in a big city. All this talk about gangs and city life is for each his own. My take is this, if you’re a person with good moral foundations, don’t spend your time worrying about gangs, and spend the time thinking about how you can better the neighbor in which you live in. Where we live which is two hours north of NYC, there are still gangs. I pay no mind to them & they don’t pay any mind to me. Gangs could be found in the biggest of all cities, right down to the tiniest of hamlets. Unfortunately is just a way of life in today’s society.

Our plan is to move come 2010 after our oldest graduates from high school. We’ve been thinking about moving to North Carolina. Seeing how so many New Yorkers are relocating to the Raleigh area, I’m not sure if this is a viable option anymore. Plus for the type of work I do (technology sector) the types of jobs I would be qualified would be scant. My wife cousins who was born and raised in Brooklyn as well, has been living in Rio Rancho the past eight years. It was a tough go at first but now he has a successful business and he loves the area. I would welcome the idea of moving out there. My only two concerns would be housing and schools. My youngest would be starting school next year, so where he goes is important. Of course housing is an issue. Where we currently live, I have one neighbor and that’s it. As much as I enjoy the peace and quietness I think I could settle into a suburban area and become acquainted with my neighbors.


I’m finishing up my bachelor’s degree in management information system. With my degree and about ten year’s experience, I don’t think finding a job in the tech sector should be an issue. I’d be willing to take a position has an lvl III tech if the opportunity presented itself. I’ve also would be willing to take a P.D. exam as a fall back options. I always wanted to be a cop so maybe a new career is in the works. Since my wife is no longer able to work. She receives a nice monthly check from Uncle Sam. What she receives from the govt. remains the same no matter where she lives. What she brings in covers more than enough of our monthly expenses.

I also have to mention, I own a 06 gsxr 750. So twisties are kind of imporant but not necessary.
Looks like you're still in a pretty early phase of identity development with pretty diffused - yet equally open - plans for your future. Enjoy it while you can. I miss that period in my life, though I still revive it ever so often in a layoff-happy, mobility-friendly industry.

In ABQ, your inclination to become a police officer would be easily actualized. The NM law enforcement forces of all kinds are so eager for new recruits that they've resorted to advertising on TV.

As for IT, take it from another geek that the job market isn't exactly as friendly as college programs lead you to believe. The market is so saturated with applicants, especially in the desirable well-rounded cities of the West, that a degree holds no more weight than a certification, sometimes less depending on the certification you're up against. If you cruise through expecting education and small-time setup/troubleshooting alone to get you work like I did, you can end up in a catch-22 of over-qualified/inexperienced. Hopefully you've found a mentor or advisor who did you the favor of directing you into lots of hands-on work (in the field, not class!), and ideally a sought-after specialty such as databasing or cryptology (two specialties that the NM Labs and military bases are happy to take in).

Of course, if your ten years experience doesn't count education or small-time, you're in. Since I finally got my foot in the door, I've seen too many confident resumes with insufficient applicable experience. Even what was an extensive knowledge base just four years ago is already becoming high-school grad commonplace. As alluded above, maybe I'm just projecting; but just in case you are coming out of school like I did, the earlier you compensate for the extremely competitive realities, the better.
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Old 02-03-2009, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
1,067 posts, read 1,883,870 times
Reputation: 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by thelazyone View Post
The North East isn't any better. With my sinus issues I could do without the humidity.
Oh, and I can relate to sinus issues, too. Since I moved from the Northwest, my clockwork biannual sinus infections were reduced to zero... miraculous as far as I'm concerned.

The downside is you'll want to use your usual oil or cream more frequently to compensate for the dryness. Congestion can literally turn into brittle, attached irritants and increase nosebleeds exponentially, not to mention just hurting. Also, the pressure changes of this high desert have made my headaches and rhinitis more frequent and intense, but those are easy to treat and pretty routine for people with sinus issues from anywhere.

You'll definitely like this climate a LOT more than back East.
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