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Old 11-18-2011, 04:03 PM
 
391 posts, read 361,558 times
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Thanks Joqua, have an address or directions?
There's plenty of out-of-the bag/box food in Las Cruces, so if I have a choice I'd rather take my chances with something house-made when I go to a restaurant. Honestly, it's sometimes inferior..but mostly it's better than the factory made foodservice stuff.
I owned a restaurant for a long time, so I know big foodservice suppliers. There's a place for it, but the thaw and serve stuff just isn't all that interesting.
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Old 11-18-2011, 06:09 PM
 
Location: Sacramento Mtns of NM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cosmicrowbar View Post
Thanks Joqua, have an address or directions?
Did you bother trying the link to their web site I included in my last post?
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Old 11-19-2011, 03:59 PM
 
391 posts, read 361,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joqua View Post
Did you bother trying the link to their web site I included in my last post?
Sorry, didn't realize it was a link until I had already submitted the reply, and didn't think it worth the time to edit it out.
Interesting looking place...love the classic Southwest Arts & Crafts Bungalow home of the restaurant. There are some nice ones in LC from the same time period.
The "fireplace from the Netherlands" quoting their home page is funny...nobody sent a darn fireplace or even parts from Dutch country. During that period a lot of Dutch imagery was used in home decor, as part of the inspiration for the Arts & Crafts design movement was from the Netherlands.
Anyway, thanks for the tip...I'll try it out the next time I'm over in Alamo for an RG Munn auction.
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Old 05-11-2012, 07:56 PM
 
120 posts, read 78,968 times
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Default Corn, Beans & Squash

Quote:
Originally Posted by cacto View Post
No one on this thread has really explained what is New Mexican food and how it's different from Mexican. I'm a an Arizonan and every time I hear about NM food I wonder why not call it Arizonan food because there is no difference as far as I can see. And don't say it's the green and red chili because that's everywhere.
I'm reminiscing here, folks.

Original, traditional, "New Mexican" food is corn, beans, and squash, the "three sisters." Chile was likely contributed by the Spanish settlers, as was wheat, which altered the native American fare drastically. For awhile, growing up, we found that the best "New Mexican" food was found in the pueblos up north, and in the Tigua Indian pueblo down near El Paso, because natives hang on to their traditional foods.

Phaseolus acutifolius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
What is Blue Corn?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Sisters_(agriculture)
Three Sisters Garden: Corn, Beans, Squash - A Native American tradition


Wheat flour added the empanada, the sopaipilla, and bunuelos. Baking powder created what is considered the "thick" tortilla, not used in Mexico. Sopaipillas were simply wheat tortillas fried in deep fat. When I think of the New Mexican foods my two grandmothers (born in the late 1880's) used to make, it's got to be empanadas filled with minced meat and piñon nuts that grew wild in northern New Mexico. New Mexicans, in those days before restaurants were common, served a blue corn porridge called chaquéhue (cha-keh-weh) or atóle (ah-to-leh), its thinner version. I fondly recall the bowl of blue mush, with red chile sauce floating on top, the colors of the landscape, like the red, yellow and blue corn grown in the northern climes. In those days the favorite chile was from Chimayo and Embudo, smaller, tastier, and less hot than the chile grown in Hatch today. Families from all over the state would travel there every fall to get their year's supply of chiles, then strung them together to dry in a rístra (rees-trah). Red chile, by the way, is dried green chile.

Chaquehue
Ristra - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Mexican" food has become a generic term. But there are differences, depending on which state is closest to the U.S border. The following observations are strictly from my point of view.

California transplants obviously miss the fish and seafood based Mexican foods from Baja California, a peninsula surrounded by the Gulf of California and the Pacific Ocean. Avocado is a tropical fruit, originating in central Mexico and not native to New Mexico. It thrives on the west coast. Growing up in New Mexico I ate my first avocado at the home of a family from Mexico.
Avocado - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Arizona food, especially near the border, is Sonoran style, utilizing nopales (cacti) and other desert plants like atún (prickly pear). They use strong flavorings like chocolate, cinnamon, vanilla, and limes to complement their simple dishes. Their tortillas are large thin circles of wheat. Avocados are plentiful. When I lived near the San Luis Rio Colorado area, bordering California and Arizona, a favorite Mexican food included potato tacos nothing at all like what the posters above say is used in New Mexico in the newcomer breakfast burrito. A filling of mashed potatoes and cheese, rolled up in corn tortillas and served with a light tomato sauce, limes, and cabbage, was a very tasty and economical dish.

Mexican border towns like El Paso serve economical Mexican foods, too, originating in Chihuahua. Plain rice becomes a milky drink called horchata, and cornmeal combines with chocolate to make a delicious drink called champurrado. These drinks are Spanish in origin.
Champurrado - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Horchata - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

So, New Mexican food is native American--corn, beans and squash--and chile and wheat coming later with the Spanish settlers.
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Old 05-13-2012, 11:36 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
3 posts, read 7,454 times
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New Mexican food is so different from any other. To sample the best, try Padilla's in Albuquerque on Girard NE (if you don't mind waiting for a table).

There is nothing like Hatch chile, and in the fall, Whole Foods and other places roast it outside and you can buy it by the lb. Take it home and peel it in cold water, dice some of it, and freeze. 25 lbs gets us through most of the year. Take care while peeling not to rub your eyes - and your hands may burn a little. It's worth it.
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Old 08-08-2013, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Western NC.
887 posts, read 622,317 times
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Could someone give a good explanation of difference between NM food and Mexican food? Couple of times on our visits people have steered us to what I considered Mexican restaurants. Food good but not exactly the same. I think of things like Posole, green chile stew as NM.
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Old 08-08-2013, 10:45 AM
 
Location: New Mexico USA
17,146 posts, read 17,859,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tsmw47 View Post
Could someone give a good explanation of difference between NM food and Mexican food? Couple of times on our visits people have steered us to what I considered Mexican restaurants. Food good but not exactly the same. I think of things like Posole, green chile stew as NM.
Sopadillas with honey and Carne Adovada initially pop into my mind. It is a common question. Here is a thread on the subject with over 150 replies: Mexican vs. New Mexican Food?
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Old 08-10-2013, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico
623 posts, read 520,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tsmw47 View Post
Could someone give a good explanation of difference between NM food and Mexican food? Couple of times on our visits people have steered us to what I considered Mexican restaurants. Food good but not exactly the same. I think of things like Posole, green chile stew as NM.
I think chile rellenos as we know them in New Mexico aren't too common in Mexico. In Mexico I think it's more common to have a stuffed poblano pepper (often with nuts and dried fruits) be referred to as a chile relleno whereas in New Mexico it is, of course, a green chile stuffed with cheese, dipped in batter and fried.

Flat enchiladas (traditionally topped with a fried egg) are something entirely unique to New Mexico, I think.

Green chile chicken enchiladas are also fairly unique to the state, I think.

Green chile stew is a good example of New Mexican food, I think, but I don't know about posole. I think it originated in Mexico and is fairly common in Mexican cuisine.
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Old 08-14-2013, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
7,739 posts, read 6,351,117 times
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With all the Hatch Chile season festivals going on here in the the DFW area, and my only grocery store source of my Red Chile sauce dried up, which I found out a week after getting back from Albuquerque, I bought a great 24" Ristra at my Central Market. I get to make my own sauce.



I have watched several recipes off of you tube, but I always come back to this little guy, just because he is so cute.


New Mexico Red Chile 101.wmv - YouTube
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Old 08-14-2013, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Trans-Pecos Texas
8,542 posts, read 11,795,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PanTerra View Post
With all the Hatch Chile season festivals going on here in the the DFW area, and my only grocery store source of my Red Chile sauce dried up, which I found out a week after getting back from Albuquerque, I bought a great 24" Ristra at my Central Market. I get to make my own sauce.



I have watched several recipes off of you tube, but I always come back to this little guy, just because he is so cute.
Pretty cool! He is cute, and it's neat to see kids doing projects like this.

Ever made red chile sauce from fresh red chile? MMMMMMMMM!

I plan to do that this next summer when I get back to growing chile in the garden (Parker)!
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