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Old 02-13-2010, 08:00 PM
 
2,147 posts, read 2,235,682 times
Reputation: 1489
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poncho_NM View Post
What makes you not believe it?

Guacamole was attributed to the Aztec empire in the 1500's. The main ingredient is the avocado which is native to the Caribbean, Mexico, South America and Central America.

Guacamole is even popular in Spain where there is commercial production of avocados.

You can grow avocados in New Mexico but I am not aware of any commercial growing.




Rich
Um,the poster is saying that avocados are not native to new mexican cuisine. And since there have been families of spanish descent living there for generations,they probably did base their cuisine in what they grew.

He is not saying he doesn't believe guacamole is big in NM today.
But heck,guac is even in Iowa and Maine these days...

I agree,guacamole was probably not part of traditional new mexican cuisine,and for the sake of food history,the question was asked.

And,as has been said,mexican food varies throughout regions...oaxaca is vastly different from the yucatan which is completely different than baja or inland mexicali area. IN fact,yucatan peninsula food doesn't even remind me of mexican food at all-ie,what i've had living in CA or visiting baja. totally different [delicious,but completely not the same,and no avocados that i recall.]
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Old 02-13-2010, 10:36 PM
 
Location: somewhere
3,667 posts, read 5,152,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
I spent a few days in Deming a few years back and the food there seemed much more Mexican than in Northern NM. What do you call that style down there, Sonoran maybe?

One major difference between Mexican and New Mexican is Mexican sauces are much more tomato oriented whereas NM is more chile oriented. Also I don't believe NM recipes use as much cumin as they do in Mexico.



very good observation and perfectly describes the difference, I cook Mexican and use the tomato base as well as cumin alot. The only time I use chile is when we make salsa or if I am making something that calls specifically for green chilis.
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Old 02-13-2010, 11:46 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,580 posts, read 9,409,407 times
Reputation: 1955
did yall know that at Costco here, the best selling produce item are the avocados, the rest of the nation its strawberries

food ofr thought
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Old 02-14-2010, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,141 posts, read 15,770,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
did yall know that at Costco here, the best selling produce item are the avocados, the rest of the nation its strawberries

food ofr thought
and the best selling drink is probably coke. That doesn't make it traditional.
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Old 02-14-2010, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Ruidoso, NM
1,644 posts, read 2,757,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuliegal View Post
When I moved to Oklahoma in '83, no one had heard of "New Mexico enchiladas" with a fried egg on top.
I never had rolled enchiladas until later in life. My mom, and the restaurants we ate in on occasion when I was a kid, served "baked enchiladas" - meaning flat with onions (etc.) in between and "over easy" fried egg(s) on top of the stack. That was in El Paso, TX. In fact the flat enchiladas were my dad's favorite Tex/Mex meal.

PS Corn tortillas - NOT flour ones.

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Old 02-14-2010, 10:08 AM
 
Location: OK
36 posts, read 38,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaxart View Post
I never had rolled enchiladas until later in life. My mom, and the restaurants we ate in on occasion when I was a kid, served "baked enchiladas" - meaning flat with onions (etc.) in between and "over easy" fried egg(s) on top of the stack. That was in El Paso, TX. In fact the flat enchiladas were my dad's favorite Tex/Mex meal.

PS Corn tortillas - NOT flour ones.

I never heard of a rolled enchilada until I left NM. We always had them the same way you did. And I never heard of using flour tortillas in enchiladas until the past 20 years or so. My m-i-l gave me a recipe using them--she lives in Ohio. I never did try that recipe! My youngest son has me break his yolk when I make his egg--now what's that all about?!!! The yolk all over is the best part!
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Old 02-14-2010, 07:31 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,580 posts, read 9,409,407 times
Reputation: 1955
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
and the best selling drink is probably coke. That doesn't make it traditional.

I never said its traditional, I know its not, I was just stating a cool little fact
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Old 02-14-2010, 07:32 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,580 posts, read 9,409,407 times
Reputation: 1955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuliegal View Post
I never heard of a rolled enchilada until I left NM. We always had them the same way you did. And I never heard of using flour tortillas in enchiladas until the past 20 years or so. My m-i-l gave me a recipe using them--she lives in Ohio. I never did try that recipe! My youngest son has me break his yolk when I make his egg--now what's that all about?!!! The yolk all over is the best part!

I never seen flat enchiladas untill I moved to ABQ, wierd huh and Im from Portales
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Old 02-15-2010, 04:48 AM
 
Location: Phoenix Arizona
1,943 posts, read 1,882,086 times
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No one on this thread has really explained what is New Mexican food and how it's different from Mexican. I'm a an Arizonan and every time I hear about NM food I wonder why not call it Arizonan food because there is no difference as far as I can see. And don't say it's the green and red chili because that's everywhere.
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Old 02-15-2010, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Ruidoso, NM
1,644 posts, read 2,757,993 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cacto View Post
No one on this thread has really explained what is New Mexican food and how it's different from Mexican.
It's as difficult to explain the differences between "Americanized" Mexican food and Mexican food found south of the border as it is to explain the REGIONAL differences within Mexico. There are but a few clear distinctions between specialties found only North of the border and those found only South of the border.

Here is a good reference for anyone willing to read it through:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_food

Quote:
The six regions of Mexico differ greatly in their cuisines.
Near the bottom of the scroll is a comparison between North and South of the border specialties.

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