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Old 03-05-2010, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Burque!
3,557 posts, read 8,266,892 times
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You're right, I don't have kids, but will some day.

I want them to have a similar childhood to mine. I loved going to Southeast Heights schools and have very special memories of growing-up in the area.

I have confidence in APS schools and teachers. I will be sending my child to an APS school. If my experience with APS is any indication of my child's likelihood to succeed, then I have nothing to worry about.
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Old 03-05-2010, 01:49 PM
 
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You are correct in the "Monte Vista, Bandelier" UNM area (Carlisle/Central vicinity) as far as eclectic and over all meeting your needs. BUT a COMMUTE FROM HELL to EITHER office. SAME with Corales (STAY away - 2 lane road (1 each way), 20 MPH)!Best bet is probably North Valley, Vista Del Norte (but bad schools, except charters).Or "off" Paseo, east of Wyoming (maybe Tanoan/Academy area), as Paseo would be a "wrong way" commute, and not as bad, depending on the times. Also depends on "where" Westside office is. Schools around Academy and Ventura/Eubank/Juan Tabo are good (and straight shot to Paseo to west side).Another option is Comanche (Louisiana to Wyoming) good schools, older houses.Westside really not an option, as I don't think there is ANYTHING > 30 yrs old.
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Old 03-05-2010, 05:02 PM
 
Location: CRESCIT EUNDO
2,551 posts, read 3,684,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karmathecat View Post
I agree and would add that I believe there are definite sub-cultures at play as well. Recently, the ABQ journal published a story about a single working immigrant mother whose two sons both excelled at APS and are now in top-notch universities ( Northwestern was one ) and she believes their success was due to her stressing the importance of education at home and her involvement with APS and her kids' education.

The problem is that she is the exception. It would have been simple for her to ignore her children, not help them with their schoolwork, not push them to excel, and that is the norm in this city.
I may be contradicting what I said earlier about parental involvement, but just looking at my own family and classmates, I've known kids who grew up in dysfunctional families with abusive, alcoholic parents and succeeded in school in spite of it (I've known two valedictorians like this), and kids who had everything handed to them, personal attention, support, private schools... and still screwed it all up. All this has given me the impression that probably >75% of success comes from within the child (genetics), and the rest may have to do with parental influence and school quality. I've known too many parents who tried to move heaven and earth to set everything up just right for their child to succeed, only the child never appreciated it and fouled up, and the parents wonder what they did wrong the rest of their lives.
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Old 03-05-2010, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Marlborough, MA
1,732 posts, read 3,492,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aries63 View Post
I've known too many parents who tried to move heaven and earth to set everything up just right for their child to succeed, only the child never appreciated it and fouled up, and the parents wonder what they did wrong the rest of their lives.
That's very interesting. Are these all people in NM? The reason I ask is that I wonder what the success rate would be in another state. I am one of 17 cousins, all of our parents graduated HS and 3 out of my mother and her siblings ( she comes from a family with 5 kids ) have college degrees. Of the 17 cousins, none is a "failure" , all work, most attended college, all graduated from HS, most have families. Of the 17, there are several journalists, a major sports league referee, an attorney, a paralegal, a photographer, two bank VP's, a police officer, a counselor, a firefighter, an IT professional ( me ), etc. No one is homeless, no one has ever been in prison, no one has ever gone bankrupt ( that I know of ) and everyone seems to be passing the same desire for education on to their kids. I truly believe this started with my grandparents who stressed education to their family.
I don't think it's genetics. Sure, some kids are naturally gifted. But even a person of average intelligence should be able to graduate HS and manage to avoid getting into serious trouble.
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Old 03-05-2010, 05:49 PM
 
3 posts, read 15,160 times
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Thanks to everybody for their thoughts. The school discussion is certainly interesting, i.e. how important exactly is having one of the best schools versus having involved parents but a school that is more mixed in its achievement on tests, etc. For us, I think we are willing to exchange some level of how good a school is in order to gain some racial & ethnic diversity, a neighborhood school, and not paying private school tuition. This is true only to a certain extent, of course, and I know we'll have to find our personal comfort level once we are actually there. I am getting the impression that the schools that have been mentioned (Bandelier, Zia, Monte Vista) would be good enough for us. Anybody out there know anything specific about Zia?

So originally I said that I thought living around UNM and commuting to the west side of Albuquerque would be a wrong-way commute and I was inferring that it would not be so bad because of that. (I was under the impression that the west side was more suburban, bedroom-community-esque and the commutes would be the other way.) People on this board are saying I was wrong in thinking that? When I look at maps, that whole NW area into Rio Rancho does look sprawling and lacking in any big highways. When my husband is negotiating this job, we'll have to get more details on where exactly they want to put this office so we can find out how much of a commute we'll be looking at, and if there are other areas that might fit our/their needs.

Someone also mentioned that it would be a bad commute from these areas around UNM to I-25 & San Mateo. Google maps puts it at 15 minutes or so, which would be fine by our standards. Anybody want to chime in on that? Is that unrealistic?
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Old 03-05-2010, 06:07 PM
 
1,939 posts, read 3,749,889 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dorothea78 View Post
People on this board are saying I was wrong in thinking that? When I look at maps, that whole NW area into Rio Rancho does look sprawling and lacking in any big highways.
I don't think anyone is disagreeing as such with that assessment as much as saying
that it may not be as bad a commute as you'd think. Just like the stock market,
timing is everything. I live on the far Westside about 2 miles south of RR and in
NON-RUSH HOUR I find it takes me about 20-25 minutes to get from the North
end of Unser to areas like the I-25 / I-40 interchange, I-40 and San Mateo
(major commuting off ramp), etc. but from where I start out there are several
major route options open to evertyone whereas coming from Corales or Rio Rancho
there are fewer options so traffic is denser and more likely to back up. A mile or
so north and that time would easily stretch another 10 or more minutes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dorothea78 View Post
Someone also mentioned that it would be a bad commute from these areas around UNM to I-25 & San Mateo. Google maps puts it at 15 minutes or so, which would be fine by our standards. Anybody want to chime in on that? Is that unrealistic?
Extremely unrealistic during rush hour, barely doable in light traffic situations.
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Old 03-05-2010, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
1,635 posts, read 2,930,722 times
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There is a great mid-century modern area in uptown, it's just north of Menaul and just east of Louisiana and full of from what I think are Mossman homes. My friends lives there, he is really into that era and their his house has all the furniture from the era. He also owns the vintage store down in Nob Hill.

If you are thinking of UNM you might as well consider Ridgecrest too.
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Old 03-15-2010, 07:06 PM
 
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Hi and hope that your transition will be easy. If I were you I would have a list of priorities b/c some of your wants conflict w/ other wants. Like you, my husband is a physician, who on occasion commutes to Rio Rancho . If schools are an issue and you're not interested in paying private school tuition I would look to the North East Heights. If you want to live in an older neighborhood many people who live there send their kids to private schools (though not all). Also the older neighborhoods are expensive. If commuting is the central issue Rio Rancho is far far far from older neighborhoods. Nice older neighborhoods are Ridgecrest, UNM Nob Hill, Albuquerque Country Club, Pill Hill neighborhood, Altura Park (which has some nice surrounding areas). None of which are close to Rio Rancho and San Mateo. Maybe you should be looking at the North Valley which would put you closer to San Mateo and have many adobes.
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Old 03-15-2010, 08:05 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
919 posts, read 1,815,119 times
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When I worked at UNM and commuted from the Cottonwood Mall area it took me 30 minutes each way when I did the drive outside of rush hour. During rush hour the time easily doubled. However, the OP's husband would be driving in the opposite direction so the times would be shorter once he started heading west. The north-south drive would not change as both directions tend to get backed up.

I have a co-worker who lives near San Pedro and Gibson and she does the reverse commute to Ventana Ranch on the west side every weekday around 8:00am and 4:00pm. She said it only takes her about 25 minutes. I don't know how she does the drive that fast, but swears the commute is not so bad by taking Gibson to I-25 and exiting on Paseo del Norte heading west. Paseo takes her all the way into Ventana Ranch.

Keep in mind the commute would not be every day since he'd also be working from the North San Mateo area on some of those days. Or, if he's already at the North San Mateo office and has to drive to the West side sometime during the day, that commute would not be very bad -- 15 to 20 minutes tops if it's not rush hour.

Aside from the commute, it sounds like the OP would feel most comfortable with the UNM area and those schools. Having supervised teachers at some of those schools near UNM, I personally didn't notice a difference in the teaching from those schools to other schools. There are kids that have the parental support and kids that don't.

And as far as the Everyday Math goes, ALL APS elementary schools will be using it when the next math adoption comes up (not including charter schools) so there will be no avoiding it. Right now it's split between Everyday Math and Investigations, but the superintendent wants a unified curriculum so that when children move from one school to another, they won't have to flip flop math programs.
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Old 03-15-2010, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Marlborough, MA
1,732 posts, read 3,492,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lobo View Post
And as far as the Everyday Math goes, ALL APS elementary schools will be using it when the next math adoption comes up (not including charter schools) so there will be no avoiding it. Right now it's split between Everyday Math and Investigations, but the superintendent wants a unified curriculum so that when children move from one school to another, they won't have to flip flop math programs.
All APS except APS charter schools which can chose an alternate math curriculum.

The charter school lotteries were tough this year. My son got into our #1 choice but in the others we applied for, he averaged about #40 on a waitlist, after slots were filled. Most Kindergarten lotteries had over 100 applicants.

More and more school systems are moving AWAY from Everyday Math; leave it to APS to universally adopt it.
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