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Old 07-31-2006, 06:24 PM
 
167 posts, read 359,174 times
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Hello all!
I am not sure if there is a thread on this here, but I thought I would open up a discussion on water shortage in New Mexico. I just bought a house in Los Lunas, and will be moving in a month.
What is the deal on water in New mexico? I am reading water will run out in 2025, that is not very long. Please inform if anyone knows. Thanks!
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Old 07-31-2006, 07:06 PM
 
142 posts, read 472,483 times
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Arrow Water issues...

Greetings,

New Mexico relies exclusively on ground water for its water supply - ABQ metro draws 100% of its water from drilled wells either shared or private. The city gets its from wells, (which is supplied to residents and businesses who are hooked up to city water) though this is starting to slowly change as the city of ABQ is building a treatment plant to treat Rio Grande water, however this is not an unlimited supply of water and the city is allowed only so much water to be drawn. So this cannot be a long term solution.

New Mexico's aquifer is curently being replenished at currently 50% of what is being drawn out - do the math...

The city cannot keep growing at the rate it is growing without alternate sources of water. Our fearless city leaders are NOT addressing this issue.

A solution will have to be made in the very near future on how to resolve this but any way you look at it - the people living here are going to pay a bundle for future water usage. Conservation of ground water will only postpone the inevitable, being we will run out of potable water.

One solution is a desalination plant to treat brackish water from the Gulf of California which I believe is currently in the works for El Paso, Texas.

We might be purchasing water from El Paso in the future and I'm quite sure for a hefty price due to their forsight on this serious matter.

However, 80% of the water currently consumed in New Mexico is for agriculture and not residential usage and I'm sure these numbers will change due to the growing population. If you are a farmer with water rights that go back a ways you'll be sitting on a gold mine.

The future of New Mexico will be depend upon a transparent liquid.

Excellent and very crucial topic btw.

Cheers

Last edited by Informer; 07-31-2006 at 07:21 PM..
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Old 07-31-2006, 08:13 PM
 
167 posts, read 359,174 times
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Informer, thanks for the reply. I should think that residents might want to address this issue with local politicians. This is a serious issue that is not only confined to New Mexico. The whole world is facing global warming and water shortages are part of this problem.
I also noticed that Los Lunas does not collect recycling. I am going to bring my recycling to the station there. I am also going to try to harvest rain water. I have gutters on my new house and can use the rain water for my yard.
I hope we can band together and get into "solution" instead of burying our heads in the sand about this.
Thanks again for the intelligent reply!
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Old 07-31-2006, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Trans-Pecos Texas
8,785 posts, read 12,074,780 times
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I hope we can band together and get into "solution" instead of burying our heads in the sand about this.

You're not kidding, Blue.....

Water in the Southwest (we have the same problems in dry West Texas) is such a critical issue, and cities/municipalities MUST plan for the future, just as El Paso is doing, as was previously mentioned.

The fact that NM relies entirely on ground water is news to me, and is definitely something that needs to be addressed and considered.

Here, we get our water both from two city-owned wells....as well as three regional lakes (Lower Colorado Municipal Water District), and those contracts were planned out years ago. They also have new items they are looking at for future water needs as we grow.

I hope you like Los Lunas. You are just having a normal case of buyer's remorse, maybe?

You'll be fine, I think!!!
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Old 07-31-2006, 11:32 PM
 
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You are all right. The Southwest does need to change their ways on water wastes. I'm in Phoenix but soon I will be out of here but I can't understand the people here with all their water wasting. All the golf courses with the watering, all the trees and grass that need constant water. Ponds everywhere wasting water by evaporation. Out of control growth here and people just think somehow water will always come. I think Phoenix is in for major trouble down the road.
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Old 08-01-2006, 01:07 AM
 
Location: Maine
8,402 posts, read 11,003,904 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crackerjack
You are all right. The Southwest does need to change their ways on water wastes.
I grew up in the Portales/Clovis area, a part of the state that averages less than 17" of rain per year. Yet the area is filled with dairies that pump millions of gallons of water per year. Add to that the peanut, corn, and various grain fields that rely solely on irrigation. The area is drying up. I'm only a bit over 30, and I can already see the difference in my lifetime. My grandparents tell stories of green fields, woods, and a river that ran between Clovis and Portales. In fact, "Portales" means "porches" in Spanish, named for the porchlike waterfalls that used to be found in the area. It's becoming a barren wasteland. Right now, the kindest thing you could call the area is "high plains." In not too many more years, it's going to be desert.
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Old 08-01-2006, 09:09 AM
_yb
 
Location: Central New Mexico
1,135 posts, read 3,412,907 times
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Albuquerque has been working on these issues for awhile now. Lots of info on this site http://www.sjcdrinkingwater.org/ . They talk about reinjecting water into the aquifer.
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Old 08-01-2006, 03:00 PM
 
167 posts, read 359,174 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathy4017
[b] I hope you like Los Lunas. You are just having a normal case of buyer's remorse, maybe? You'll be fine, I think!!!
I hope so!! I hope I am going to be fine!!! I just keep thinking well, if I spend a total of 6 grand max moving out there and then moving back here it is still cheaper than spending another year paying rent. It is going to be a huge change so it will take some time.

Is this normal? I mean fairly common to all of a sudden think" what have I done, aghhhhh!!"
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Old 08-01-2006, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Rio Rancho New Mexico
16 posts, read 71,861 times
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Great post! There are actually varying thoughts on this and also varying solutions to it. The Informer did have a very insightful post and I agree generally with his direction. However, I have talked to developers who have had their own research done on the water situation and they said that we were much better off than is known. Water shortage is a political issue. When I moved to Phoenix, I read all sorts of posts about water shortages and problems with running out of water. It had me worried. However, during my stay there, I didn't once have a problem.
It does make sense to me though that in the future there may be a problem once current aquifers are depleted. Basic economics would offer a simple solution to a complex problem. Let water prices fluctuate with supply problems. If that ever happens, it will be amazing to watch the number of people who put in synthetic grass, and then water issues will be over for another 50 years.
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Old 08-01-2006, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Trans-Pecos Texas
8,785 posts, read 12,074,780 times
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I mean fairly common to all of a sudden think" what have I done, aghhhhh!!

Yes, totally, LOL!!!!!

I got a relo packet for Pagosa Springs, CO, and have another one for Los Alamos, NM that is on its way, according to the email that the C of C just sent me.

You have an enormous advantage in having an aunt who already lives there!!!

She can help you more than you know!!!

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