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Old 01-01-2011, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Don't be a cry baby!
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I really enjoy having a glass of whiskey w/ soda then after a few of those I'll have a whiskey over ice. I realy enjoy this treat when its cold outside so I don't do this all year.
Ever since I watched a program on the making of a whiskey I decided to start trying differnt brands. Last year I bought "Ardmore" scotch whiskey
and I didn't like it at all. So far I like Bushmills but I was told its on the lower level as far as Irish whiskey's go. Last night I bought two different brands, "Jack Daniels single barrel" and "Knob Creek". Personally, I don't like them as much as Bushmills. I hate to wait another year to buy a bottle of whiskey that I may not like so I would like to ask you folks here to post up some good (in your opinion) whiskeys/bourbon I can try.
So far I've tried'

Crown Royal

Bushmills (My favorite)

Jack Daniel's Singel Barrel

Knob Creek

What do you all think?
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Old 01-01-2011, 09:35 AM
 
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I think your taste buds need some education. I used to be like you, I thought crown, jack, bushmills etc were great tasting examples of whisky. Until someone poured me a glass of Glenfiddich 40 year old single malt scotch whisky at room temp "never over ice" with just a touch of room temp water to blossom the bouquet of the drink. Thus my educational journey to find better tasting Whisky began. Now mind you I am not a snob I will drink Jack, Crown etc over ice and mixed with diet coke because of the cheap price of the drink. The coldness of the ice and coke mask the unrefined and stunted growth of the drink. The whiskies you enjoy are for the masses because of the relatively cheap price for which they can be bought.

At my parties I serve Jack, Crown and Johnny to the crowd. When some one asks for whisky and water with no ice I know I have a real whisky aficionado on my hands and break out the good stuff.

Here is a place to begin your whisky education. Enjoy the trip. See you in
Islay when you finally arrive you will understand.

Whisky Magazine ~ Celebrating the whiskies of the world
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Old 01-01-2011, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Don't be a cry baby!
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Thanks, I completely understand the concept of "under educated" taste buds. I'll enjoy the journey.
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Old 01-01-2011, 09:54 AM
 
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Tyrconnell is one of my favorite Irish whiskeys.

I suspect you were put off by the peatiness of the Ardmore. I love a good Islay single malt but wouldn't serve it as an introduction to Scotch.

You might try Glenfiddich (I like the 15yo Solera) or Glenmorangie Original as more easily appreciated examples of Scotch whisky.

I agree with bulldogdad's suggestion as to how to best enjoy good whisky. Save the ice and soda for the cheap stuff.
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Old 01-01-2011, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Don't be a cry baby!
1,310 posts, read 1,182,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by outbacknv View Post
Tyrconnell is one of my favorite Irish whiskeys.

I suspect you were put off by the peatiness of the Ardmore. I love a good Islay single malt but wouldn't serve it as an introduction to Scotch.

You might try Glenfiddich (I like the 15yo Solera) or Glenmorangie Original as more easily appreciated examples of Scotch whisky.

I agree with bulldogdad's suggestion as to how to best enjoy good whisky. Save the ice and soda for the cheap stuff.

Dead on w/ Ardmore, I thought it would be a nice marinade for a steak . Ardmore wasn't bad tasting just too different for me, at the time. I'm going to try the Tyrconnell next. I've found just through looking on the web sites that the Irish whiskeys are lighter in color. Although I would like to say I can stick w/ American Bourbons I feel the Irish have whiskeys I prefer.
The weather has turned cooler today so a sample of something tonight might be in order.
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Old 01-01-2011, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,392 posts, read 37,733,186 times
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I'm very fond of Single Malt Scotch. Unfortunately, while in Scotland many years ago, I tasted several that are my favorites that are not available here.

However, a while back, while going into Twin Liquors to pick up some Amarello as a gift, I passed a whisky tasting and my world changed.

Glenlivet Nadurra, 16 years old, cask strength, neat. (Or with a touch of water if you insist, but I prefer it neat.) Taken very occasionally, on appropriate occasions, not too often. Like last night, instead of champagne, to see the old year out and give the new year a warm and promising welcome. (We saved the champagne for Mimosas today.)
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Old 01-01-2011, 12:44 PM
 
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I've never been able to drink the blended whiskies, always a headache even with a small sippin glass. Give me good old Tennesee sour mash bourbon. For casual entertaining I serve Gentleman Jack (Jack Daniels). I simpley haven't found a bourbon I love since the George Dickle distillery had their fire several years back; I loved their "white label".
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Old 01-01-2011, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Phoenix,Arizona
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lifelongMOgal View Post
Give me good old Tennesee sour mash bourbon.
Me Too
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Old 01-01-2011, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Pawnee Nation
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PCincorrect View Post
What do you all think?
Ok, you have a Canadian, an Irish, a Tennessee Whiskey, and a Kentucky bourbon.....all blended, all mass produced in huge quantities, all decent but certainly not top notch beverages. If you carry those in your liquor cabinet they are great.......you can make good mixed drinks, or you can serve it on the rocks, or if you encounter a guest that likes it neat with maybe a splash of water at room temperature.....they are a product they won't gag over. While you are at it, lay in a bottle of a decent rye.

If money is no object, I would get a bottle of Laphroaig 30 one of the finest Islay's out there, but be prepared to pay between $500 and $700 depending on where you live. I am currently enjoying a Laphroaig 10 at cask strength (about 110 proof). It too is an Islay Scotch with a strong flavor of peat. It retails at a more modest $50 +/-.

You didn't mention which bushmills you were drinking, but I assume it is the lower priced blend, not the more expensive (and better sipping) 10/16/20 year old malts. the one you are drinking is an excellent mixer in any recipe that calls for scotch. I've even used it in a cream sauce over steak and mushrooms and it was fantastic.

As a 'starter" scotch, try one of the lower cost single malts....there are several from the midlands or highlands. One of my preferred (I use it as my "well" scotch at home) is Speyburn 10 year old single malt. It will run you around $20 for a 750 ml.

Parts of some reviews:

Quote:
The Facts in a Nutshell
People who are serious about their scotch understand that what most think of as “taste” comes from a combination of different sensory inputs. Already tainted by decades of abuse from urban living and extended “Government sponsored excursions” through far off exotic lands, below are my own readings of the Speyburn Single Malt experience:

Color: The first part of taste is through the eyes. The color and clarity prepares the other senses much like overture prepares the audience. The Speyburn is a pale gold, highlighted with specs of amber highlights. You might want to double check with your wife or girlfriend, but I have been told that only the color of diamonds brings on the feeling of wellbeing that gold does.

Nose: Next is the actual smell. That tulip shaped glass from an earlier paragraph does help assure me that I do not miss that important part of the experience. The nose identifies the sent with the coming taste. In this case there is a mixture of lemon fruitness, with a slight hint of orange.

Taste: As scotch travels through your mouth, different sensors record different flavors for the mix. At best it is medium bodied, with a fruity character and a slightly peaty finish.

Mouth: The overall experience of your mouth is one of malt (while savored), light orange marmalade, but not overpowering. I think of it as a pleasant experience to complement the finish of another day of life.

Recommended With: I have always thought of scotch as a social beverage. No, not one that make you more of a social lion, but one with a desire to mix with other tastes and pleasures. The Speyburn compliments a lighter, creamy milk chocolate, possibly a lighter Jamacian cigar (rather than the overly robust Houdurans), and relaxed converstations.
Don’t Judge a Single Malt by its Price! - Speyburn 10 year Single Malt Scotch - Epinions.com

Quote:
This isn't a bad whiskey, it just isn't a particularly exciting one. It is very easy to drink, almost like an Irish whiskey in that sense, and perhaps those that are a little overpowered by some of the richer, more complex Scotch Whiskey's will appreciate this one. It has a very light quality to it, perhaps from a mingling of the airy, woody overtones and the more buried mineral quality, that makes it well suited to an afternoon drink.

I generally take my Scotch neat, and I found with this one I am very, very sparing when it comes to adding water--if you are used to putting a "splash" of water in your Scotch, put a "drop" in this. It is a rather simple whiskey, overall, but it's certainly not bad. I probably wouldn't go out of my way to buy another bottle, unless I saw it on sale again. I do think it would be a very good way to introduce someone to whiskey, and those who are used to drinking vodka or rum might find that this whiskey opens the door to a multitude of new flavors without being too overpowering. I also think it would be a good choice to follow a meal if you've been drinking white wine. If you're a bourbon fan like me, you will probably find this whiskey leaves you somewhat unsatisfied, but it does grow on you. Overall, for the price it is very good value, and I wouldn't be ashamed to have it in my bar.
A good value in a single malt, lacks a little complexity. - Speyburn 10 year Single Malt Scotch - Epinions.com

Note the second reviewer compares this low cost scotch to Irish?

In short, this is an excellent introduction to scotch......once you begin to identify and appreciate the complexity of the flavors THEN tackle a Laphroaig or other Islay scotch (Islay is an Island off the coast of Scotland where the finest, most complex flavored whiskeys in the world are produced) or a good traditionally produced scotch.......
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Old 01-11-2011, 01:49 PM
 
Location: New York City
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Nothing compares to a good single-malt scotch, but if it's blended, I prefer a blended irish to a blended scotch (or even a light single malt like Glenlivet 12). By the way, you don't want to drink a fine single-malt with soda because it overpowers the delicate flavors.

To acclimatize your taste buds, start by cutting back on the soda, then cut back on the ice until you're down to one cube. That way you can start to appreciate all of the subtleties. Once you're accustomed to irish with one cube, you can move up to a mid-range single malt.

Many connoisseurs like scotch with two or three drops of water.
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