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Old 01-18-2014, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Michigan
2,198 posts, read 2,237,362 times
Reputation: 2091

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People drink it because it's cheaper and/or because they have unrefined palates when it comes to beer. It's the same way with wine, cheese, olive oil, whiskey, etc. It takes time and experience to develop a refined palate for these things, especially for bitter/hoppy beers since they are a bit of an acquired taste.

The average bar/restaurant doesn't have much of a beer selection either. The best you're likely to find there is usually Sam Adams, New Castle, Stella Artois, etc. Most people don't venture beyond those and most people don't do much experimenting at the liquor store. I live in one of the best regions of the world for beer (Southern Michigan/Northern Indiana/Northern Ohio) and even here when I look at what places usually have on tap it's really depressing considering all the great beers made around here.

Some people just want to get drunk and don't care that much about taste. I can't really criticize them for it because I'm sort of the same way with wine. I rarely spend more than ~$10 for a bottle of wine. To me the extra money for better quality is not worth it like it is with beer. It's a cost/benefit ratio that varies by preferences, disposable income, etc.
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Old 01-20-2014, 09:22 AM
 
6,040 posts, read 4,407,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EugeneOnegin View Post
It takes time and experience to develop a refined palate for these things, especially for bitter/hoppy beers since they are a bit of an acquired taste.
I'm legitimately curious what your take is on the (as put so succinctly here earlier) "IPA penis-measuring hop contest could be solved by just eating a pine tree."

Seems like IPAs have somehow become sacrosanct more so than other styles. I don't get it.

"A beer for every season, and every reason."
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Old 01-20-2014, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Finland
6,321 posts, read 5,560,168 times
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I am drinking some yellow fizzy crap (Green Kukko brewed by Laitilan. I especially like it because kukko means cockerel/rooster so I can truthfully say I have a **** in my hand) right now and it tastes delicious
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Old 01-20-2014, 02:08 PM
 
Location: IL
2,992 posts, read 4,405,101 times
Reputation: 3085
Quote:
Originally Posted by EugeneOnegin View Post
People drink it because it's cheaper and/or because they have unrefined palates when it comes to beer. It's the same way with wine, cheese, olive oil, whiskey, etc. It takes time and experience to develop a refined palate for these things, especially for bitter/hoppy beers since they are a bit of an acquired taste.
Or, people like to switch it up and mix micro and macro beers...that's what my friends and I all do.
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Old 01-20-2014, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Howard County, MD
2,223 posts, read 2,983,327 times
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My thing is though, weak beers don't even really get you drunk. Maybe if you're a girl, or you're just trying to maintain a buzz, but personally I need something well over 5% to do the heavy lifting.
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Old 01-20-2014, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Fairfax, VA
304 posts, read 852,576 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sskink View Post
I recently had a lager from Lagunitas (can't recall the name). It was very good, but I couldn't see paying near $40 for a case of very good lager when I can pay under $30 for a case of Pilsner Urquell, which, while a slightly different style, serves the same purpose for me as top-notch "yellow fizz" when I want a lower ABV than my usual IPAs.
A more affordable lager you should try is Session (from Full Sail Brewery in Oregon). I can get it in Virginia at around $13-$14 for a 12-pack of stubby bottles (they're 11 oz., look like Red Stripe but that is where the similarities end). It's not the best lager I've ever had but certainly far from my least favorite, it's just a good all-day beer. Oh and they have a black lager as well that's ok too.
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Old 01-23-2014, 12:44 PM
 
Location: IL
2,992 posts, read 4,405,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sskink View Post
I recently had a lager from Lagunitas (can't recall the name). It was very good, but I couldn't see paying near $40 for a case of very good lager when I can pay under $30 for a case of Pilsner Urquell, which, while a slightly different style, serves the same purpose for me as top-notch "yellow fizz" when I want a lower ABV than my usual IPAs.
After what, 170 years, Pilsner Urquell is still the best lager on the planet.
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Old 01-24-2014, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Michigan
2,198 posts, read 2,237,362 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elhelmete View Post
I'm legitimately curious what your take is on the (as put so succinctly here earlier) "IPA penis-measuring hop contest could be solved by just eating a pine tree."

Seems like IPAs have somehow become sacrosanct more so than other styles. I don't get it.

"A beer for every season, and every reason."
My favorite beers tend to be pretty hoppy APA/IPA/DIPAs but some of them are just one trick ponies with tons of bitterness and hops no balance.

Even with the good ones (Zombie Dust, Dreadnaught, Pliny the Elder, Double Jack, etc.). I like to switch it up with some easier drinkers, especially at home. For me pale ales are a whole lot better and go down a lot easier out of a tap than a bottle. I can easily drink 4 or 5 23oz Zombie Dusts on draft but out of a bottle it's a lot harder for some reason, even if I pour them into a glass.

Last edited by EugeneOnegin; 01-24-2014 at 07:04 PM..
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Old 01-24-2014, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Michigan
2,198 posts, read 2,237,362 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by almost3am View Post
After what, 170 years, Pilsner Urquell is still the best lager on the planet.
I had some last week. It was a lot drier than I remember. I didn't really care for the dryness, it was like drinking Brut champagne.
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Old 01-24-2014, 07:03 PM
 
Location: a little bit of everywhere
87 posts, read 115,051 times
Reputation: 251
I just don't understand that either.
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