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Old 10-18-2017, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Valley of the Sun
1,349 posts, read 1,100,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bellakin123 View Post
I'm not a Scotch drinker so I'm a little clueless. The only think I know is "whisky" refers to Scotch and "whiskey" refers to bourbon. That's all I got.


I want to get a bottle of Scotch for someone (15 year old--the Scotch, not him lol) and I'm a little lost with the various barrels and "malts".


For example, there are different types of Macallan 15 year old Scotch. Some say Scotch Whisky, some say Malt.


Is it all Scotches are whisky but not all whiskies are Scotches? I'm so confused.


Anyway, what would some of you recommend for a good quality 15 year old Scotch? Not looking for Johnny Walker and I'm familiar with Macallan, Glenlivet, Glenfiddich and Glenmorangie.
How about something completely different from those? Lagavulin 16 year. It's QUITE a bit different from a standard scotch and definitely NOT for everyone.

https://www.thewhiskyexchange.com/p/...in-16-year-old

I found a bottle at Costco once for $60.
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Old 10-20-2017, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
7,846 posts, read 10,772,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lewdog_5 View Post
How about something completely different from those? Lagavulin 16 year. It's QUITE a bit different from a standard scotch and definitely NOT for everyone.

https://www.thewhiskyexchange.com/p/...in-16-year-old

I found a bottle at Costco once for $60.
What makes it different? I've seen 18 year and older--I imagine they are "stronger"? $60 is very reasonable. I'd like to keep it under $100.


I know he likes 15 year so not sure if he'd like 16 and older
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Old 10-20-2017, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Valley of the Sun
1,349 posts, read 1,100,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bellakin123 View Post
What makes it different? I've seen 18 year and older--I imagine they are "stronger"? $60 is very reasonable. I'd like to keep it under $100.


I know he likes 15 year so not sure if he'd like 16 and older
Has nothing to do with being "stronger." It has everything to do with it's flavor profile which has more smoke than anything I've tasted. It's very strong but very different from anything I've tasted. It's not something I'd love to have all the time, but it's very unique and I think many guests you had over would be willing to try. Good conversation piece.
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Old 10-20-2017, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Middle America
36,491 posts, read 41,679,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bellakin123 View Post
I'm not a Scotch drinker so I'm a little clueless. The only think I know is "whisky" refers to Scotch and "whiskey" refers to bourbon. That's all I got.
The "ey" ending refers to any type that's not Scotch, not just Bourbon. Irish whiskey, for instance, is an "ey."

You also don't hear Scots themselves referring to anything as Scotch. They just call it whisky.


Quote:
I want to get a bottle of Scotch for someone (15 year old--the Scotch, not him lol) and I'm a little lost with the various barrels and "malts".


For example, there are different types of Macallan 15 year old Scotch. Some say Scotch Whisky, some say Malt.

Is it all Scotches are whisky but not all whiskies are Scotches? I'm so confused.
All Macallan is Scotch (whisky). It's a single malt, and considered a Speyside, because of the region the Macallan distillery is located in, along the River Spey.

The biggest difference you're gonna see with Scotch whiskies is whether it's a single malt, or a blend of different malts. Of those you list, Johnnie Walker is a blend. But whether single malt or blend, it's still whisky.

Sometimes whisky is matured in barrels/casks that were used for other purposes. Sherry casks and bourbon casks used to mature whisky impart different notes.


Quote:


Anyway, what would some of you recommend for a good quality 15 year old Scotch? Not looking for Johnny Walker and I'm familiar with Macallan, Glenlivet, Glenfiddich and Glenmorangie.
It's truly hard to recommend without knowing taste preferences. Whisky made in different regions of Scotland is done in different styles, has different flavors. A smokey, peated Islay type is a different drink altogether than a sweeter, grassy Speyside, or one that's matured in Sherry casks, for instance.

It's not unlike buying wine for somebody. To get something they'll likely enjoy, you have to know what flavor profiles and styles they prefer.

The age doesn't necessarily make a whisky better or worse, though it often affects price point. It didn't mean it's stronger. It's just that different v yeasts result in different flavor profiles, much like wine.

Last edited by TabulaRasa; 10-20-2017 at 11:00 PM..
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Old 10-20-2017, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Middle America
36,491 posts, read 41,679,184 times
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This isn't the most complete map showing different whisky distilling regions, but it isn't bad. It gives some descriptions of flavor profiles, too.

Under the Islay designation, they note one of my favorites, Bruichladdich.

whisky regions map
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Old 10-27-2017, 12:08 PM
 
73 posts, read 74,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
This isn't the most complete map showing different whisky distilling regions, but it isn't bad. It gives some descriptions of flavor profiles, too.

Under the Islay designation, they note one of my favorites, Bruichladdich.

whisky regions map
Friday night sounds perfect for giving Bruichladdich a try.
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Old 01-10-2018, 10:57 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
36 posts, read 16,289 times
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Tried Old Smuggler this past week. Did not disappoint.
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Old 05-12-2018, 03:09 PM
 
1,450 posts, read 1,811,349 times
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I have learned to appreciate blends over single malts... much less expensive and often less harsh. I like Johnnie Walker Black Label - it has a certain sweetness/smootheness and I think it sells for right around the OP's figure.

Brings me to a question - How does Chivas Regal 12 compare to Dewars 12? I am sure I have tried both but not in many years so wondering which would be a good try on a Saturday night.
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Old 05-13-2018, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Harbor Springs, Michigan
2,292 posts, read 2,631,184 times
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I'm usually an Islay peaty whiskey sipper (my favourite being Caol Ila) however I recently tried Tomatin 12yr which is a highland whiskey and was pleasantly surprised.
I paid $32 which puts it right in between the cheaper Grouse and Dewars and quite a bit under my usual tipples which are usually in the $60-80 range.
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Old 05-13-2018, 09:50 AM
 
Location: 912 feet above sea level
2,270 posts, read 869,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bellakin123 View Post
I'm not a Scotch drinker so I'm a little clueless. The only think I know is "whisky" refers to Scotch and "whiskey" refers to bourbon. That's all I got.
There's more to whiskey/whisky than Scotch and bourbon. For example, there's rye whiskey and single malt whiskey which is not Scotch (because it originates other than in Scotland) and wheat whiskey and a few other varieties.

Generally, 'whiskey' is used in the United States and Ireland, while in the rest of the world - Scotland, Canada, Japan, etc. - 'whisky' is used. In the middle of the 19th century, both varieties were used interchangeably in both British and American English. Since then, the Brits have generally moved away from the 'e' while Americans have moved towards it, though the stateside shakeout took longer. People think 'whisky' means Scotch because since 'whisky' is exclusively used in the only place where Scotch can be produced. Usage is still not uniform among American brands, however, such as in the case of George Dickel, which has been producing the spirit since before the spelling was (mostly) settled in the United States.

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