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Old 01-11-2011, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Houston-ish
345 posts, read 959,119 times
Reputation: 214

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I've been allergic to cinnamon for a few years now, and my symptoms are getting progressively worse. I often have to finish Christmas shopping by Thanksgiving because department stores often have "spice" or cinnamon scented candles to entice buyers. Just smelling the spice is bad for me.

It's becoming increasingly more difficult to avoid the spice, I've noticed. I was at work and purchased a non-threatening piece of french toast (no characteristic cinnamon swirls in sight). Before I knew it, my throat was tight and entire face was swollen.

Since cinnamon is not a common allergy, there is no labeling to warm poor saps like myself that the offending spice may be in a particular product.

I've never been a big fan of the spice, but I sure do miss pumpkin muffins and the like. I have found via research, however, that cinnamon is common in Indian food or anything containing curry. I love Indian food!

Anyone out there have any similar experiences?
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Old 07-03-2012, 12:32 PM
 
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I have always had issues with cinnamon candies and avoided them. However, after being able to have the nature cinnamon spice for over 20 years, I recently developed a cinnamon allergy. I call this the ninja spice because it hides out in more common foods than just desserts as most people would assume. I can't have cassia or cinnamon. I experience trouble breathing, swelling of the throat and rash on the tongue and lungs. Sometimes the reaction is immediate and other times it is delayed. It's getting more and more severe. The problem for me is that I don't always know that I've had it until the next day when my mouth is inflamed and has bumps.

Things that you should know that have cinnamon that you may not think of: Curry paste, BBQ sauce (Any time ingredient list reads spices beware it could contain the ninja spice), Old Bay (3rd ingredient sorry crab lovers), all spice, Baked beans such as Bush's, pre-seasoned sausages, Honey Baked Ham and of course most desserts like pies, cookies and such...check labels on dark chocolates, herbal teas, chips especially bbq flavored, authentic Mexican cuisines, organic products like waffles or sweet potato fries.

I'm currently looking for a brand of bbq that is absolutely safe...please post if you know of one, as of right now I have to make my own.
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Old 12-15-2012, 02:15 PM
 
2 posts, read 58,462 times
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Hello, I have only just started having effects from cinnamon, starting with a horrible taste in the mouth and not being able to taste my food properly afterwards also mouth gets very sore, especally the tongue.....is this normal?? I have always been able to eat it in the past. it's taken weeks to get my taste back to normal and today I ate part of a cake whilst xmas shopping and found that it had cinnamon in it, stopped eating it imedietly and am hoping the effects will wear off before xmas, any tips to get my taste back to normal????
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Old 12-15-2012, 08:42 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 36,387,593 times
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You are probably eating cassia, and not true cinnamon. True cinnamon is a rare spice now, and most commercial cinnamon is cultivated from cassia bark these days. Unfortunately, while the flavor isn't that much different, cassia has a higher level of coumarin, which is toxic when isolated and extracted. On the upside, powdered cinnamon (whether cassia or true cinnamon) won't be toxic, in general - you'd have to eat a whole lot of it to get the amount that causes toxicity when the coumarin is isolated and extracted. On the downside, it's more likely that people will either have a sensitivity to it, or develop one, than if they were consuming true cinnamon.

The only thing you can do, really, is to just avoid eating things flavored with cinnamon. If you want the taste of cinnamon (I love it, and I'm very grateful that I'm not sensitive to the Indonesian cassia), look for Ceylon Cinnamon - cinnamomum verum. If you buy natural bark, you can tell which is which by looking at it.

Cassia sticks are curled from each side into the middle. The bark is fairly thick, and extremely dense.

Ceylon cinnamon sticks are rolled up from one end -to- the other. The bark is fairly thin, and more delicate than cassia.
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Old 12-16-2012, 01:52 PM
 
Location: southern born and southern bred
12,478 posts, read 14,942,178 times
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no answers. Just wanted to say I thought I was alone in this matter. And I don't get nearly as sick as you guys. Yikes. What I do feel,after ingesting anything with cinnamon, is nauseated and after smelling too much of the aroma I get a migraine also.
Too bad too because I really enjoy the taste of cinnamon baked goods.
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Old 12-17-2012, 05:36 PM
 
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Thanks guy's. thanks for reply's glad i'm not on own with this, although I don't wish this on anyone............ I am just so mad that I didn't know what was causing my symtoms, I feel as though I have drunk acid as my mouth and throat are so raw and even water taste like acid too. i've even tried just eating natural yogurt and even that burns my throat too should I go and see my Doctor about this or will he think i'm loopy ????
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Old 07-02-2013, 12:21 AM
 
1 posts, read 27,591 times
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I have a severe cinnamon/cassia allergy as well. It started 18 years ago and got progressively worse. About 3 years ago it started getting a lot worse a lot faster. I now have to carry an epipen at ALL times in case the Benadryl stops working altogether. My most severe reaction (anaphylaxis) occurs when I inhale or digest "artificial" cinnamon such as candies, candles and air fresheners. I swear there are cinnamon air fresheners in 80% or more of public bathrooms. I even was dismissed from jury duty because I couldn't use any bathrooms in the courthouse. Due to "real" cinnamon I don't usually go in to bakeries or coffee shops, and I excuse myself from the table at restaurants if someone is getting a cinnamon dessert. My allergist informed me that I may not be able to go to restaurants safely for much longer if this continues to get worse.

I have reactions if I touch anything with cinnamon oils or if the oils get into the air (ex: if someone heats up a cinnamon roll or chai latte).

Regarding the more common cinnamon and cassia infested products, be cautious of the following foods:
Greek, Mexican, Turkish, Indian, Chinese, Thai, Australian, North African, Caribbean, middle eastern, Indonesian, Latin American, German, and now American vegetarian and vegan foods and diet bars. With all of the hype around the health benefits of cinnamon, we are seeing a big increase in it being added to food items even if it isn't adding any detectable flavor. More and more it is being added to chocolate chip cookie recipes at restaurants, bakeries, home recipes and even prepackaged goods. I always assume that recipes could have changed and read labels and/or ask questions.


I'm also allergic to cinnamon related chemicals such as cinnamate (also look for cinnamal). These are found in the majority of beauty products, toiletries, perfumes, and sunscreens. Here are some other tips of what to look for:

Alternative names for cinnamates

2-ethoxyethyl p-methoxy cinnamate
Cinoxate
Isobutyl salicyl cinnamate
Octyl methoxycinnamate
Octinoxate
Octocrylene (2-ethylhexyl-2-ciano-3, 3-diphenyl acrylate)
Further information

Formula: 2-ethoxyethyl p-methoxy cinnamate C14H18O4

CAS number: 104-28-9

Cross reactions:

balsam of Peru
tolu balsam
coca leaves
cinnamic aldehyde
cinnamic oil
esters of cinnamates

I know that was a lot of info, but hopefully it helps someone.
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Old 07-02-2013, 09:59 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 92,241,841 times
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I'm no allergic to cinnamon, but I'm allergic to a rarely used spice---wasabi. I worry about eating out at restaurants because chefs can toss a spice into anything. The very first time I had an allergic reaction was when I was eating tuna salad. TUNA SALAD. I thought I was allergic to tuna for years. Then I had wasabi covered pees and discovered my real allergy. It turns out wasabi is often used in seafood. Condiments are a risk too. It can be in mustard or anything really. Again, it's not a commonly used spice, but it freaks me out that I could accidently encounter it again.
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Old 07-02-2013, 09:36 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
3,552 posts, read 6,168,743 times
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No allergy to cinnamon but I allergic to bleached white flour...talk about u avoidable.. It's in EVERYTHING and its mother. My mouth breaks out in sores, specifically on my tongue and I get dizziness nc a general ill feeling for days till it cycles out... Allergies suck !!!
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Old 07-03-2013, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Michigan
2,198 posts, read 2,243,334 times
Reputation: 2091
Quote:
Originally Posted by kms32925 View Post

Things that you should know that have cinnamon that you may not think of: Curry paste, BBQ sauce (Any time ingredient list reads spices beware it could contain the ninja spice), Old Bay (3rd ingredient sorry crab lovers), all spice, Baked beans such as Bush's, pre-seasoned sausages, Honey Baked Ham and of course most desserts like pies, cookies and such...check labels on dark chocolates, herbal teas, chips especially bbq flavored, authentic Mexican cuisines, organic products like waffles or sweet potato fries.
All spice is the dried berries of the pimenta dioica tree. It has a cinnamon-like flavor component to it but it's not related to cinnamon.
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