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Old 03-21-2019, 10:33 PM
 
Location: .N6 A4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokey12345 View Post
Got it. I may be semi-sensitive to falling barometric pressures, too. Curious, though - why is rain a factor here? Just with the barometric drops that follow suit?
I typically feel pressure when a storm is building up. I think that normally corresponds to falling barometric pressure.

https://sciencing.com/rain-pressure-low-8738476.html

I also have at least one severe mold allergy, so moisture is not my friend (at least when it comes to mold). Unfortunately, I don't think even fairly dry climates are as nearly free of outdoor mold as I had expected.
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Old 03-23-2019, 05:22 PM
 
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Have you done any investigating into the below? Looks like promising results...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6708699

Clarifix
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Old 03-23-2019, 05:44 PM
 
Location: .N6 A4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokey12345 View Post
Have you done any investigating into the below? Looks like promising results...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6708699

Clarifix
Sounds good but the fact that it's from 1984 makes me skeptical. Why isn't it standard by now if it's that good?
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Old 03-23-2019, 06:06 PM
 
Location: .N6 A4
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Still sounds kind of promising (literature review from last year):

Quote:
RESULTS:

A total of 110 abstracts were identified, of which 15 were included in this review. Epistaxis and nasal obstruction were commonly reported complications. No serious adverse events were reported. For obstructive symptoms, "reduced" symptoms were reported in 63.4% to 100% of patients. In regard to rhinorrhea, reports of reduced symptoms were experienced from 77% to 100% of patients. Seven studies used only patient-reported improvements without stratifying results based on symptom type; general improvements ranged from 67% to 100%. Nine studies noted symptom improvement in nonallergic cohorts ranging from 67% to 97.5% of patients. Four studies noted improvement in allergic cohorts ranging from 63.4% to 80% of patients. Two studies noted improvement in patients with mixed pictures ranging from 92.5% to 100%.
CONCLUSIONS:

Although cryotherapy appears safe and efficacious, heterogeneous past investigations with low-quality evidence make strong, evidence-based recommendations difficult to make. Further study with validated metrics and controlled populations is certainly warranted and should be encouraged.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30229670

I get periodic sinus chemical cautery (not exactly the same that's used for nose bleeds), had extensive sinus surgery in 2015, and follow-up in-office ballon sinuplasty in 2016. I'm still feeling a little burned out on new procedures, but it might be worth it for me to ask about it, if the gains I've made aren't sustained.

I'm actually having a bad day today, but it was due to exposure to fumes yesterday and today. I'm not sure I can expect not to have some sinus distress from rare exposure to irritants.

It looks like my ENT does this procedure. I may ask about it. There may be specific reasons why he didn't recommend it in my case. On the other hand, it's possible he only started performing this procedure recently.

Last edited by ApartmentNomad; 03-23-2019 at 06:36 PM..
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Old 03-24-2019, 09:13 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ApartmentNomad View Post
Still sounds kind of promising (literature review from last year):



https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30229670

I get periodic sinus chemical cautery (not exactly the same that's used for nose bleeds), had extensive sinus surgery in 2015, and follow-up in-office ballon sinuplasty in 2016. I'm still feeling a little burned out on new procedures, but it might be worth it for me to ask about it, if the gains I've made aren't sustained.

I'm actually having a bad day today, but it was due to exposure to fumes yesterday and today. I'm not sure I can expect not to have some sinus distress from rare exposure to irritants.

It looks like my ENT does this procedure. I may ask about it. There may be specific reasons why he didn't recommend it in my case. On the other hand, it's possible he only started performing this procedure recently.
I will also ask about it. I actually meant to share the article that you had found, not the outdated one. The procedure does look promising, with minimal side effects. My only worry is that I have the 'dry' kind of vasomotor rhinitis, in that I just swell up, and have a general sense of fatigue. Hopefully that can still help. Other than that, I'm looking to move. Just need to identify the best spot.
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Old 03-24-2019, 09:23 AM
 
Location: .N6 A4
3,478 posts, read 4,372,557 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokey12345 View Post
I will also ask about it. I actually meant to share the article that you had found, not the outdated one. The procedure does look promising, with minimal side effects. My only worry is that I have the 'dry' kind of vasomotor rhinitis, in that I just swell up, and have a general sense of fatigue. Hopefully that can still help. Other than that, I'm looking to move. Just need to identify the best spot.
Same here. I experience fatigue and have sensations of pressure, which are presumably the result of swelling; but I don't have a runny nose, or sneezing. I used to sometimes get post-nasal drip in connection with storm systems, but that was years ago. (In fact, I remember my primary care physician at the time being dumbfounded by how my post-nasal drip wouldn't stop over the course of a few days, when we were having lots of storms. He ended up prescribing temporary use of an antihistamine spray, which worked. Then the issue stopped, once the weather cleared, and I was able to stop taking the medicine. I hope I have the details correct. This was probably a couple decades ago.)

The thing is, I am already always on an antihistamine, a corticosteroid nasal spray, and a mucous thinner, for my allergies, so a lot of my symptoms are controlled. If I weren't on any medications, I don't know what my symptoms would like in response to vasomotor rhinitis triggers (or allergies).
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Old 04-03-2019, 06:05 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ApartmentNomad View Post
Same here. I experience fatigue and have sensations of pressure, which are presumably the result of swelling; but I don't have a runny nose, or sneezing. I used to sometimes get post-nasal drip in connection with storm systems, but that was years ago. (In fact, I remember my primary care physician at the time being dumbfounded by how my post-nasal drip wouldn't stop over the course of a few days, when we were having lots of storms. He ended up prescribing temporary use of an antihistamine spray, which worked. Then the issue stopped, once the weather cleared, and I was able to stop taking the medicine. I hope I have the details correct. This was probably a couple decades ago.)

The thing is, I am already always on an antihistamine, a corticosteroid nasal spray, and a mucous thinner, for my allergies, so a lot of my symptoms are controlled. If I weren't on any medications, I don't know what my symptoms would like in response to vasomotor rhinitis triggers (or allergies).
I checked into Clarifix, and the doctor was dismissive. Seems (according to him) it would only work on 'old people'.

Needless to say, I visited NC this last week, and noticed that I was reacting to changes in weather, too. It was high in pollen the entire time I was there, so I'm sure that plays a factor.

Have you looked into any coastal cities in FL? Of course there is mold, although at relatively low amounts, year-round. The coastal breeze keeps everything in check from a barometric and allergy stand-point, based on what I can tell.
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Old 04-03-2019, 10:08 AM
 
Location: .N6 A4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smokey12345 View Post
Have you looked into any coastal cities in FL? Of course there is mold, although at relatively low amounts, year-round. The coastal breeze keeps everything in check from a barometric and allergy stand-point, based on what I can tell.
The mold levels I've found for Florida cities would be too high for me to take chances with.

Are you familiar with this source for pollen and mold counts (when available)?

https://www.aaaai.org/

While there may be fewer barometric pressure fluctuations in Florida, on a day-to-day basis, there are also more storm systems, which is a bigger issue for me at this point that normal diurnal barometric fluctuation, or normal fluctuation from one day to another.

Also, I'd rather avoid moving somewhere warmer than Albuquerque, since winter freezes (which we do typically get, at least to some degree) are probably beneficial for my allergies (although, to be honest, I don't necessarily see that benefit in my winter allergy symptoms, but maybe that's because I'm not addressing in-door allergens adequately).

To take Tampa as an example (a city where I have some family, although I've never been there), one which actually provides authoritative mold spore counts, this is what I have in my notes:
July 13, 2016: Mold: High (per NAB).
“Albuquerque has 127.6% less rainy days than Tampa.”
Warmer in winter.
I doubt other coastal Florida cities will be much different.

Meanwhile, I only used sudafed once in March, which is quite good for me.

Currently using (that might be relevant to the problem):

Standard allergy/sinus medicines (Allegra, Mucinex, Nasacort)
Nattokinase (this seemed to help in the beginning, but I'm not entirely sure what it is or isn't doing now)
Quercetin (which I had been using incorrectly before--now taking without meals, since you don't want the enzyme used up digesting food)
Liposomal vitamin C (still adjusting dosage)

As needed: Nasol capsaicin spray (surprisingly effective at times, for mild pressure build-up)

Every two months: sinus chemical cautery (with phenol).
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Old 04-04-2019, 05:26 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ApartmentNomad View Post
The mold levels I've found for Florida cities would be too high for me to take chances with.

Are you familiar with this source for pollen and mold counts (when available)?

https://www.aaaai.org/

While there may be fewer barometric pressure fluctuations in Florida, on a day-to-day basis, there are also more storm systems, which is a bigger issue for me at this point that normal diurnal barometric fluctuation, or normal fluctuation from one day to another.

Also, I'd rather avoid moving somewhere warmer than Albuquerque, since winter freezes (which we do typically get, at least to some degree) are probably beneficial for my allergies (although, to be honest, I don't necessarily see that benefit in my winter allergy symptoms, but maybe that's because I'm not addressing in-door allergens adequately).

To take Tampa as an example (a city where I have some family, although I've never been there), one which actually provides authoritative mold spore counts, this is what I have in my notes:
July 13, 2016: Mold: High (per NAB).
“Albuquerque has 127.6% less rainy days than Tampa.”
Warmer in winter.
I doubt other coastal Florida cities will be much different.

Meanwhile, I only used sudafed once in March, which is quite good for me.

Currently using (that might be relevant to the problem):

Standard allergy/sinus medicines (Allegra, Mucinex, Nasacort)
Nattokinase (this seemed to help in the beginning, but I'm not entirely sure what it is or isn't doing now)
Quercetin (which I had been using incorrectly before--now taking without meals, since you don't want the enzyme used up digesting food)
Liposomal vitamin C (still adjusting dosage)

As needed: Nasol capsaicin spray (surprisingly effective at times, for mild pressure build-up)

Every two months: sinus chemical cautery (with phenol).

I have, although I wish they kept data for over 6 months.... I do feel like all allergies would be substantially better near the ocean (say, within .5 miles), as the ocean breeze should keep things relatively fresh.

As far as the mold in FL, it is there, although almost always at low concentrations. Again, if that's impacted by the coast, I'm not entirely sure, but it's worth investigating.

Is there any way to measure 'storm systems' objectively? Like, can you draw data for variability in weather as it pertains to storm systems? Clearly we have barometric pressure readings, but I don't know what to do for storms, etc, as I'm trying to track all of these things in conjunction with how I feel and sleep.
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Old 04-04-2019, 07:19 AM
 
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Also, have you ever tried any kind of diets (like anti-inflammatory)?
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