U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Allergies
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-16-2015, 06:16 PM
 
1,174 posts, read 749,487 times
Reputation: 3362

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lyndarn View Post
I'm shocked!! This Pen is not anything that could be abused..The drug company is well passed it's need to recoup it's costs....In fact as a now retired nurse who's final contract was with Allergists..who taught about how to administer and precautions..THIS is a LIFE SAVING item..Not some drug/injection that could ever be abused...SMH!!

Just an educations note here..Expiry date is 18 months post manufacturing date..BUT most consumer's pick their prescriptions are unaware of that..and see expire date..( 4 months/6 months)...I say..do NOT accept that ..refuse & demand an UTD item manufactured and expire date responsible..especially given Op's costs ...!!

It should be available for anyone who has ever experienced analphylastic reactions..especially bee/wasp/hornet/insect stings!!!! By my experiences the "Yellow Jacket's stings" are the most virulent and causes the worst reactions after just a few stings.....Gerrr..

Medically legally..any medical clinic must have Non-expired meds..so HAVE TO remove from stock..But practically..THEY really aren't useless for a much longer period.

Should You Use an Expired EpiPen

Is Expired Epinephrine Still OK to Use?


So if it's common for people to have expired injectable epinephrine kits, would it be ok to use them for the treatment of anaphylaxis? This exact question was studied by a group of researchers in Canada and published in the year 2000. The group collected expired EpiPens and determined the potency of the epinephrine contained within them. The potency of the epinephrine was determined by two methods: Taking blood samples from rabbits after they were injected with the expired EpiPens, as well as performing chemical tests on the residual amount of solution left in the EpiPens after they were used. The measurements found in the expired EpiPens were compared to measurements from non-expired EpiPens.
While both methods studied showed that the expired EpiPens contained less epinephrine compared to the non-expired EpiPens, there was still a surprisingly high amount of epinephrine in the expired EpiPens. Even EpiPens that were 5 to 7 years past expiration date still had more than 70% of the original dose remaining in the device. Many EpiPens that were 2 to 3 years past their expiration date had more than 90% of the original dose remaining.


....I truly HATE to see how consumer's get ripped off!! Do not throw out expired Epi-pens until replaced..or better keep it as a backup...read above link!!
Hope this helps!! ( just remember..keep it in a cool dark place ( it is heat and light sensitive)
abuse potential (or lack thereof) has no connection to the cost of drugs.

expiration dates are not necessarily 18 months after mfg. they are based on the stability/physical/chemical properties of the drug/dosage form. storage is also a consideration.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-17-2015, 05:22 PM
 
530 posts, read 989,366 times
Reputation: 1140
The last time I refilled our shots it cost about $300 for a two pack, and that was after using the $100 off coupon ("free" co pay) mentioned here. We have a high deductible plan too. When we began getting these shots about 15 years ago, they were free with our insurance. Over the years, I've seen the cost rise and rise. I read a suggestion somewhere that the cost is rising possibly because the companies are trying to get as much money as they can before patents expire. I have no idea if that is true, but it is painful on the pocketbook.

I normally do check the expiration dates when I get our shots refilled too, and I have asked the pharmacist to try to find one with a later expiration date if possible. It has helped in a couple of cases. We have to have shots always on hand for our daughter's severe food allergy. I had a pharmacist recently assume I would not want it because of the cost, but this is a "must" expenditure.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2015, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
14,558 posts, read 8,386,623 times
Reputation: 29099
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grasonville View Post
A friend of mine (in her 50's) needs to have this on hand for her and her son due to bee allergies. She told me that because she has a high insurance deductible - a TWO pack - which is how they are sold - costs her over $300.00 out of pocket.
These won't become generic until September - what do people do who don't have that kind of money??
Any suggestions appreciated.
Don't even get me started on the cost of medication. I am taking Aptiom for seizures. It is very new and of course not available in generic. It's a maintainence drug for me, and I need 30 pills a month. My original copay for it was $85/month (Yikes!) and I gladly paid it because it worked much better for me than the generic I had been taking. Now I am in the insurance "donut hole" and the copay jumped to $324/month, which is completely unaffordable for me. I'm going back to the doctor next month to switch to something else, which will probably not work as well for me.

Because I'm on Medicare, I'm not eligible for any patient assistance program. Ironically, Medicare recipients often need financial assistance with medication costs more than people on other insurance plans, because they have both lower incomes and take more medications, but federal law prohibits pharmaceutical companies from helping Medicare patients with drug costs. I'm not eligible for help through Social Security either, because my tiny income is considered too high to help me with that enormous copay
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2015, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,299 posts, read 35,841,586 times
Reputation: 62649
Quote:
Originally Posted by teeteeca View Post
FYI the $0 copay card is actually just a coupon for $100 off. So if you have a high-deductable plan you may still end up paying a couple hundred dollars. Just depends on your insurance. If your copay is $30 or $50 or even $100, then the epi's/auvi's will be free.

Stinks! I wish they wouldn't call it a $0 copay coupon--very misleading.

But still, it's $100 off...and every little bit helps!
Right.

This brings my out of pocket expense "down" from about $400 to about $300.

Oh, and did I mention that I'm paying $1137 a month (yes, a MONTH) for BCBS health insurance - with a $5000 deductible?

Yeah, the ACA is really working for me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2015, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Florida & Cebu, Philippines
2,808 posts, read 2,422,604 times
Reputation: 2870
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Right.

This brings my out of pocket expense "down" from about $400 to about $300.

Oh, and did I mention that I'm paying $1137 a month (yes, a MONTH) for BCBS health insurance - with a $5000 deductible?

Yeah, the ACA is really working for me.
Did you read my post 10 HERE, that would save you most of those costs for at least this one med. Ask your doctor if he can get you a bottle and give you some syringes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2015, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,299 posts, read 35,841,586 times
Reputation: 62649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Lee View Post
Did you read my post 10 HERE, that would save you most of those costs for at least this one med. Ask your doctor if he can get you a bottle and give you some syringes.
Yes, and I am going to ask my doctor about it. Thank you.

I also have heard that generic Epipens will be coming on the market in September. That is only a few weeks away. I may watch to see if this happens. I mean, honestly I wouldn't mind paying SOME for these things, but sheeze, $300 or $400????????
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2015, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Geneva, IL
12,982 posts, read 12,214,794 times
Reputation: 14815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Lee View Post
Did you read my post 10 HERE, that would save you most of those costs for at least this one med. Ask your doctor if he can get you a bottle and give you some syringes.
But......this form must be stored in a refrigerator so could only be used in the home.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2015, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Florida & Cebu, Philippines
2,808 posts, read 2,422,604 times
Reputation: 2870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zimbochick View Post
But......this form must be stored in a refrigerator so could only be used in the home.
Store between 59 and 77 degrees is what is on the box, so not in a refrigerator. So having it with a person in their office or home is probably best but I have had a bottle with me when we travel and while in the Philippines where we shut our a/c off whenever we go out and it has never gone bad.

At under $20 each bottle, a person can buy a new one every few months if they wish and it would still be much less in a year than even one epipen.

BTW, Epipen storage is basically the same but many people carry them with them.

Storing the EpiPen® Auto-Injector
EpiPen® and EpiPen Jr® (epinephrine injection) Auto-Injectors should be stored in the carrier tube provided at a temperature of 25ºC (77ºF); however, temperature excursions between 15ºC and 30ºC (59ºF to 86ºF) are permitted.1 EpiPen® and EpiPen Jr® Auto-Injectors should not be stored in refrigerators or in a vehicle’s glove box.1,2 EpiPen® Auto-Injectors should not be exposed to extreme heat or cold2 and should be protected from light.

Epinephrine injection, auto-injectors, and prefilled syringes
Store at 59° to 86°F. Protect from light. Protect from freezing. Discard vial and contents 30 days after initial use.

But I would never store in a syringe since I tried that and it got very weak.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2015, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Geneva, IL
12,982 posts, read 12,214,794 times
Reputation: 14815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Lee View Post
Store between 59 and 77 degrees is what is on the box, so not in a refrigerator. So having it with a person in their office or home is probably best but I have had a bottle with me when we travel and while in the Philippines where we shut our a/c off whenever we go out and it has never gone bad.

At under $20 each bottle, a person can buy a new one every few months if they wish and it would still be much less in a year than even one epipen.

BTW, Epipen storage is basically the same but many people carry them with them.

Storing the EpiPen® Auto-Injector
EpiPen® and EpiPen Jr® (epinephrine injection) Auto-Injectors should be stored in the carrier tube provided at a temperature of 25ºC (77ºF); however, temperature excursions between 15ºC and 30ºC (59ºF to 86ºF) are permitted.1 EpiPen® and EpiPen Jr® Auto-Injectors should not be stored in refrigerators or in a vehicle’s glove box.1,2 EpiPen® Auto-Injectors should not be exposed to extreme heat or cold2 and should be protected from light.

Epinephrine injection, auto-injectors, and prefilled syringes
Store at 59° to 86°F. Protect from light. Protect from freezing. Discard vial and contents 30 days after initial use.

But I would never store in a syringe since I tried that and it got very weak.
But you were talking about the multidose bottle which must be stored in a refrigerator. The Epi-Pen is not multidose.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2015, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Florida & Cebu, Philippines
2,808 posts, read 2,422,604 times
Reputation: 2870
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zimbochick View Post
But you were talking about the multidose bottle which must be stored in a refrigerator. The Epi-Pen is not multidose.
Prefilled syringes come from a person drawing them out of a bottle. Doctors I have seen leave the bottle out of a refrigerator, the package the bottle comes in says to store it between 59 degrees and 77 degrees, so how is that in a refrigerator.
================================================== ==============================
Long-term stability of epinephrine dispensed in unsealed syringes for the first-aid treatment of anaphylaxis.

Long-term stability of epinephrine dispensed in unsealed syringes for the first-aid treatment of anaphylaxis. - PubMed - NCBI
CONCLUSION:In hot climates, if an unsealed syringe prefilled with an epinephrine dose is provided for the first-aid treatment of anaphylaxis, it should be replaced every few months on a regular basis with a new syringe containing a fresh dose of epinephrine

So if doses in a syringe can last in hot climates for a few months, how can the contents of a bottle kept in the original box be any worse. In reality and from my personal experience, it is best to keep the medicine in the original bottle to last longer and as I already posted, it is not supposed to be kept in a refrigerator unless the refrigerator is set between 59 and 77 degrees.

Anyway, all I can tell you and others is what a number of doctors told me, what works for me and what is on the package the bottle comes in. So far I have had three bottles and all have the same printed on their label and the only one that ever got weak on me was when I left some in a syringe, never when left in the bottle, no matter what temperature I left it in including in our condo in the Philippines without the a/c on when temps reached in the mid 80's and when my wife has carried it around in her shoulder bag when out and about in Florida and in the Philippines, both of which gets pretty darn hot and also while in other countries. And on top of all that, even when in an epipen, it is not supposed to be carried in temps above or below what I posted but people do it all the time and it seems they still work, in fact years ago before I had the syringes and bottle, I had to use an epipen that was years old and carried in all temps, because that was all I had, but I did need two doses yet it still worked.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Allergies
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top